journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Thoracic Surgery Clinics

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627060/tribute-to-frederick-griffith-pearson-1926-2016
#1
EDITORIAL
Richard J Finley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627059/fundamentals-of-airway-surgery-part-i
#2
EDITORIAL
Jean Deslauriers, Farid M Shamji
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627058/nonoperative-endoscopic-management-of-benign-tracheobronchial-disorders
#3
REVIEW
Cameron D Wright
Modern thoracic surgery requires knowledge and skill in advanced bronchoscopic techniques. Rigid bronchoscopy remains a workhorse for the management of central airway obstruction. Dilation of tracheal strictures is now much simpler with the advent of the balloon dilator, which can be passed through a therapeutic bronchoscope. Numerous adjuncts, such as laser, argon beam coagulation, electrocautery, and cryotherapy, can be used to improve airway patency. There are now numerous stenting options for strictures that require stenting to maintain airway patency...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627057/prophylaxis-and-treatment-of-complications-after-tracheal-resection
#4
REVIEW
Paulo Francisco Guerreiro Cardoso, Benoit Jacques Bibas, Helio Minamoto, Paulo Manuel Pêgo-Fernandes
Tracheal resections are major surgical procedures with a complication rate as high as 44%. Early detection of complications followed by a structured and expedited course of action is critical for achieving a successful outcome. The prevention of complications after tracheal resection starts with a correct indication for resection. A thorough preoperative evaluation, meticulous surgical technique, and good postoperative care in a center that performs airway surgery routinely are important factors for achieving good results...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627056/airway-management-following-tracheal-surgery
#5
REVIEW
Thomas R J Todd
The ability to remove longer segments of airway and to extend resections into the larynx proper has managed to create novel situations that will require attention to postoperative management. This article deals with prophylactic measures to prevent the requirement of assisted ventilation. It, however, also emphasizes various bronchoscopic and intubation techniques, which if required, will help to avoid trauma to the airway anastomosis. In addition, a variety of ventilator modalities are discussed that were developed by the author over many years at the Toronto General Hospital...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627055/factors-favoring-and-impairing-healing-of-tracheal-anastomosis
#6
REVIEW
Farid M Shamji
The factors governing successful healing of and impairing of tracheal and bronchial anastomosis are best understood by reviewing the normal histologic changes accompanying healing, governing factors, and biochemical advances made in the last 5 decades. Normal wound healing factors, also relevant to tracheal and bronchial reconstruction, rely on precise handling of tissues without interfering with tissue perfusion, careful selection and placement of sutures, and steps to minimize tension. Impairments of satisfactory healing are well recognized in gastrointestinal surgery and apply to tracheal and carinal resection, and sleeve bronchial resection...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627054/distal-tracheal-resection-and-reconstruction-state-of-the-art-and-lessons-learned
#7
REVIEW
Douglas Mathisen
Tracheal disease is an infrequent problem requiring surgery. A high index of suspicion is necessary to correctly diagnose the problems. Primary concerns are safe control and assessment of the airway, familiarity with the principles of airway surgery, preserving tracheal blood supply, and avoiding anastomotic tension. A precise reproducible anastomotic technique must be mastered. Operation requires close cooperation with a knowledgeable anesthesia team. The surgeon must understand how to achieve the least tension on the anastomosis to avoid...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627053/laryngeal-split-and-rib-cartilage-interpositional-grafting-treatment-option-for-glottic-and-subglottic-stenosis-in-adults
#8
REVIEW
Wael Hasan, Patrick Gullane
Optimal management of tracheal stenosis depends on identifying causative factors. Risk factors include high tracheostomy, cricothyroidotomy, prolonged intubation, and proximal migration of an endotracheal tube cuff. Management ranges from conservative observation to endoscopic procedures or open surgical resections. The goal of surgical repair is an adequate airway, decannulation, and normal laryngeal function. For early stage disease, management of refractory conditions is via endoscopic procedures. An understanding of the respiratory function of the glottis and subglottis is essential when an optimum functional reconstruction of the glottic/subglottic area is considered...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627052/partial-cricotracheal-resection-and-extended-cricotracheal-resection-for-pediatric-laryngotracheal-stenosis
#9
REVIEW
Philippe Monnier
The management of pediatric laryngotracheal stenosis remains a challenging problem for the surgeon. The complexity of the various preoperative situations implies that no single treatment modality can solve the problem. This article focuses on the yield of partial cricotracheal resection and extended cricotracheal resection for the most severe grades of stenosis. Overall decannulation rates of 95% and 100% can be expected for isolated subglottic stenosis in patients with and without comorbidities but only 68% and 90% for patients with glotto-subglottic stenosis, respectively...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627051/contemporary-management-of-idiopathic-laryngotracheal-stenosis
#10
REVIEW
Laura Donahoe, Shaf Keshavjee
Idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis is a rare but well-described indication for subglottic tracheal resection. Initially described by Pearson in 1975, the 1-stage subglottic tracheal resection with reconstruction of the airway ensures preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerves while resulting in an effective and durable repair of the stenosis.
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627050/tracheobronchomalacia-and-expiratory-collapse-of-central-airways
#11
REVIEW
Cameron D Wright
Tracheobronchomalacia is an uncommon acquired disorder of the central airways. Common symptoms include dyspnea, constant coughing, inability to raise secretions, and recurrent respiratory infections. Evaluation includes an inspiratory-expiratory chest CT (dynamic CT), an awake functional bronchoscopy, and pulmonary function studies. Patients with significant associated symptoms and severe collapse on CT and bronchoscopy are offered membranous wall plication. Tracheobronchoplasty is performed through a right thoracotomy...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627049/tuberculosis-and-other-granulomatous-diseases-of-the-airway
#12
REVIEW
Rajan Santosham, Jean Deslauriers
Granulomatous diseases of the airway are challenging lesions to diagnose and effectively manage not only because they are uncommon but also because they can occur in different forms, each with unique clinical and radiological characteristics. Most such lesions can be effectively managed conservatively with repeated airway dilatation, use of intraluminal stents, and specific antimicrobial treatment. The only exception is those lesions presenting with localized airway obstruction wherein surgical resection may be indicated and beneficial...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627048/pathology-of-primary-tracheobronchial-malignancies-other-than-adenoid-cystic-carcinomas
#13
REVIEW
Darroch Moores, Paresh Mane
Most primary tracheal tumors are malignant. Malignancy of larynx and bronchi are much more likely than trachea. Tracheal tumors are most likely due to direct extension for surrounding tumors. Squamous cell carcinoma and adenoid cystic carcinoma make up about two-thirds of adult primary tracheal tumors. Because of their predominantly local growth pattern, malignant salivary gland-type tumors show a better outcome than other histologic types.
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627047/biology-of-adenoid-cystic-carcinoma-of-the-tracheobronchial-tree-and-principles-of-management
#14
REVIEW
Donna E Maziak
Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea is a rare tumor. The mainstay of treatment remains surgical resection, even in the presence of positive margins or metastatic disease. Perineural involvement commonly causes positive margins and should not deter from resection. Knowledge of releasing maneuvers is essential for surgical success. Long-term follow-up is required with patients presenting late and surviving with recurrent disease for years.
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627046/tracheal-injuries-complicating-prolonged-intubation-and-tracheostomy
#15
REVIEW
Joel D Cooper
Respiratory care advances such as the introduction of ventilatory assistance have been associated with postintubation airway stenosis resulting from tracheal injury at the site of the inflatable cuff on endotracheal or tracheostomy tubes. Low-pressure cuffs have significantly reduced this occurrence. Loss of airway stability at the site of a tracheostomy stoma may result in tracheal stenosis. Subglottic stenosis may result from a high tracheostomy site at, or just inferior to, the cricoid arch, or to malposition of an endotracheal tube cuff...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627045/advanced-technologies-for-imaging-and-visualization-of-the-tracheobronchial-tree-from-computed-tomography-and-mri-to-virtual-endoscopy
#16
REVIEW
Micheal C McInnis, Gordon Weisbrod, Heidi Schmidt
Advanced imaging plays an increasingly important role in the evaluation of the trachea. The use of computed tomography (CT) has evolved to include multi-planar reconstructions and 3-dimensional reconstructions for the evaluation of benign and malignant disease of the trachea. Advanced applications of CT include dynamic expiratory imaging for the diagnosis of tracheomalacia and virtual endoscopy as a complementary or alternative examination to flexible bronchoscopy. MRI of the trachea has limited applications but may see increased use in the future...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627044/fundamental-and-practical-aspects-of-airway-anatomy-from-glottis-to-segmental-bronchus
#17
REVIEW
Reza J Mehran
The surgical anatomy of the airways from the glottis to segmental bronchi is reviewed with a focused review on pertinent anatomic findings surrounding common surgical procedures. The knowledge of the anatomy of the trachea while performing tracheostomy, tracheal and sleeve carinal resection, and bronchoplastic procedures is addressed. Pertinent anatomic relationships as evident on common computed tomographic imagery are emphasized.
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627043/birth-of-airway-surgery-and-evolution-over-the-past-fifty-years
#18
REVIEW
Jean Deslauriers
Significant developments in airway surgery occurred following the introduction of mechanical ventilators and intubation with cuffed endotracheal tubes during the poliomyelitis epidemic of the 1950s. The resulting plethora of postintubation injuries provided extensive experience with resection and reconstruction of stenotic tracheal lesions. In the early 1960s, it was thought that no more 2 cm of trachea could be removed. By the late 1960s, this was challenged owing to better knowledge of airway anatomy and blood supply, tension-releasing maneuvers, and improved anesthetic techniques...
May 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150044/thoracic-surgery-in-the-special-care-patient
#19
Sharon Ben-Or
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150043/synchronous-esophageal-and-lung-cancer
#20
REVIEW
Amar N Mukerji, Andrea Wolf
Synchronous lung and esophageal cancers are rare but represent a unique challenge to thoracic surgeons. The literature is limited but series describe long-term survival with curative surgery for concomitant esophageal and lung cancer. Preoperative risk assessment is critical because surgical resection of both cancers requires adequate cardiopulmonary function and performance status. Chemotherapy and radiation are used as adjuvant therapy or as primary treatment of unresectable lesions. Although long-term survival for patients with concomitant lung and esophageal cancer is lower than that of patients with either one alone, survival with curative surgery is higher than that of patients with metastatic disease of either primary...
February 2018: Thoracic Surgery Clinics
journal
journal
40591
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"