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Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317246/brain-gene-expression-is-influenced-by-incubation-temperature-during-leopard-gecko-eublepharis-macularius-development
#1
Maria Michela Pallotta, Mimmo Turano, Raffaele Ronca, Marcello Mezzasalma, Agnese Petraccioli, Gaetano Odierna, Teresa Capriglione
Sexual differentiation (SD) during development results in anatomical, metabolic, and physiological differences that involve not only the gonads, but also a variety of other biological structures, such as the brain, determining differences in morphology, behavior, and response in the breeding season. In many reptiles, whose sex is determined by egg incubation temperature, such as the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, embryos incubated at different temperatures clearly differ in the volume of brain nuclei that modulate behavior...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28296138/the-regulation-of-uterine-proinflammatory-gene-expression-during-pregnancy-in-the-live-bearing-lizard-pseudemoia-entrecasteauxii
#2
Kevin Hendrawan, Camilla M Whittington, Matthew C Brandley, Katherine Belov, Michael B Thompson
The evolutionary transition from egg-laying to live-bearing in amniote vertebrates (reptiles and mammals) requires the development of a closer association between the maternal and embryonic tissue to facilitate gas and nutrient exchange with the embryo. Because the embryo is an allograft to the father and mother, it could be considered foreign by the maternal immune system and thus be immunologically rejected during pregnancy. In eutherian ("placental") mammals, the proinflammatory genes interleukin 1B (IL1B), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 1A (TNFRSF1A) are tightly regulated in the pregnant uterus to prevent embryonic rejection...
March 10, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251828/enriched-environment-increases-pcna-and-parp1-levels-in-octopus-vulgaris-central-nervous-system-first-evidence-of-adult-neurogenesis-in-lophotrochozoa
#3
Carla Bertapelle, Gianluca Polese, Anna Di Cosmo
Organisms showing a complex and centralized nervous system, such as teleosts, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, and among invertebrates, crustaceans and insects, can adjust their behavior according to the environmental challenges. Proliferation, differentiation, migration, and axonal and dendritic development of newborn neurons take place in brain areas where structural plasticity, involved in learning, memory, and sensory stimuli integration, occurs. Octopus vulgaris has a complex and centralized nervous system, located between the eyes, with a hierarchical organization...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251823/comparative-morphology-of-the-penis-and-clitoris-in-four-species-of-moles-talpidae
#4
Adriane Watkins Sinclair, Stephen Glickman, Kenneth Catania, Akio Shinohara, Lawrence Baskin, Gerald R Cunha
The penile and clitoral anatomy of four species of Talpid moles (broad-footed, star-nosed, hairy-tailed, and Japanese shrew moles) were investigated to define penile and clitoral anatomy and to examine the relationship of the clitoral anatomy with the presence or absence of ovotestes. The ovotestis contains ovarian tissue and glandular tissue resembling fetal testicular tissue and can produce androgens. The ovotestis is present in star-nosed and hairy-tailed moles, but not in broad-footed and Japanese shrew moles...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251806/implications-of-vertebrate-craniodental-evo-devo-for-human-oral-health
#5
REVIEW
Julia C Boughner
Highly processed diets eaten by postindustrial modern human populations coincide with higher frequencies of third molar impaction, malocclusion, and temporomandibular joint disorders that affect millions of people worldwide each year. Current treatments address symptoms, not causes, because the multifactorial etiologies of these three concerns mask which factors incline certain people to malocclusion, impaction, and/or joint issues. Deep scientific curiosity about the origins of jaws and dentitions continues to yield rich insights about the developmental genetic mechanisms that underpin healthy craniodental morphogenesis and integration...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229564/diversification-of-hox-gene-clusters-in-osteoglossomorph-fish-in-comparison-to-other-teleosts-and-the-spotted-gar-outgroup
#6
Kyle J Martin, Peter W H Holland
An ancient genome duplication (TGD or 3R) occurred in teleost fish after divergence from the lineage leading to gar. This genome duplication is shared by the three extant teleost lineages: Osteoglossomorpha (bony-tongues), Elopomorpha (eels and tarpons), and Clupeocephala (a large clade including salmon, carp, medaka, zebrafish, cichlids, pufferfish, stickleback, and ∼26,000 other species). After TGD, different clupeocephalan species retained different gene duplicates; this is seen clearly in Hox gene clusters but extends to all genes...
February 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229554/comparison-of-egg-envelope-thickness-in-teleosts-and-its-relationship-to-the-sites-of-zp-protein-synthesis
#7
Kaori Sano, Mari Kawaguchi, Keita Katano, Kenji Tomita, Mayu Inokuchi, Tatsuki Nagasawa, Junya Hiroi, Toyoji Kaneko, Takashi Kitagawa, Takafumi Fujimoto, Katsutoshi Arai, Masaru Tanaka, Shigeki Yasumasu
Teleost egg envelope generally consists of a thin outer layer and a thick inner layer. The inner layer of the Pacific herring egg envelope is further divided into distinct inner layers I and II. In our previous study, we cloned four zona pellucida (ZP) proteins (HgZPBa, HgZPBb, HgZPCa, and HgZPCb) from Pacific herring, two of which (HgZPBa and HgZPCa) were synthesized in the liver and two (HgZPBb and HgZPCb) in the ovary. In this study, we raised antibodies against these four proteins to identify their locations using immunohistochemistry...
February 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229527/melanotransferrin-new-homolog-genes-and-their-differential-expression-during-intestinal-regeneration-in-the-sea-cucumber-holothuria-glaberrima
#8
Josué Hernández-Pasos, Griselle Valentín-Tirado, José E García-Arrarás
Melanotransferrin (MTf) is a protein associated with oncogenetic, developmental, and immune processes which function remains unclear. The MTf gene has been reported in numerous vertebrate and invertebrate species, including echinoderms. We now report the finding of four different MTfs in the transcriptome of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima. Sequence studies and phylogenetic analyses were done to ascertain the similarities among the putative proteins and their relationship with other transferrin family members...
February 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191733/a-novel-dynamic-expression-of-vasa-in-male-germ-cells-during-spermatogenesis-in-the-chinese-soft-shell-turtle-pelidiscus-sinensis
#9
Wei Li, Piaoyi Zhang, Xuling Wu, Xinping Zhu, Hongyan Xu
vasa gene encodes a highly conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase, required for germ cell development across animal kingdom. Vasa mutations cause male infertility in mammals. It has been widely used as a biomarker for studying animal fertility or manipulating germ cells in organisms. However, in reptilians, the functions of vasa gene involved in germ cell differentiation are largely unclear; this hampers the development of biological techniques and the improvement of the productivity in these species. Here a vasa cDNA was isolated in Chinese soft-shell turtle and it predicts a protein of 691 amino acid residues, which is 72%, 69%, 58%, 59%, and 54-56% identical to its homolog from mouse, platypus, frog, chicken, and fish, respectively, and named as PsVasa...
February 13, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28111907/seilacher-konstruktions-morphologie-morphodynamics-and-the-evolution-of-form
#10
Derek E G Briggs
Adolf Seilacher (1925-2014) was a German paleontologist who made the concept of Konstruktions-Morphologie (constructional morphology) his own, recognizing that organism morphology is not simply an adaptive response to selection pressure but incorporates phylogenetic and structural influences as well. He was particularly interested in "fabricational noise," nonadaptive features that are a consequence of available materials and modes of growth, but he also elucidated the nature of adaptive radiations-in bivalves and sand dollars, for example...
January 23, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097823/excess-retinoic-acid-induces-fusion-of-centra-by-degenerating-intervertebral-ligament-cells-in-japanese-flounder-paralichthys-olivaceus
#11
Xiaoming Wu, Qiran Chen, Youhei Washio, Hayato Yokoi, Tohru Suzuki
In marine aquaculture fish, excessive supplement of vitamin A (VA) to zooplanktons for larval culture and experimental exposure of larvae to retinoic acid (RA: active form of VA) have been known to cause vertebral deformity. However, the tissues in the developing vertebral column that are affected by RA and the progression of vertebral deformity remain undetermined. To examine these questions, we histologically traced the progress of vertebral deformity induced by RA in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)...
January 18, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074622/-holostei-versus-halecostomi-problem-insight-from-cytogenetics-of-ancient-nonteleost-actinopterygian-fish-bowfin-amia-calva
#12
Zuzana Majtánová, Radka Symonová, Lenin Arias-Rodriguez, Lauren Sallan, Petr Ráb
Bowfin belongs to an ancient lineage of nonteleost ray-finned fishes (actinopterygians) and is the only extant survivor of a once diverged group, the Halecomorphi or Amiiformes. Owing to the scarcity of extant nonteleost ray-finned lineages, also referred as "living fossils," their phylogenetic interrelationships have been the target of multiple hypotheses concerning their sister group relationships. Molecular and morphological data sets have produced controversial results; bowfin is considered as either the sister group to genome-duplicated teleosts (together forming the group of Halecostomi) or to gars (Lepisosteiformes; together forming the group of Holostei)...
January 11, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074535/gene-ages-nomenclatures-and-functional-diversification-of-the-methuselah-methuselah-like-gpcr-family-in-drosophila-and-tribolium
#13
REVIEW
Markus Friedrich, Jeffery W Jones
Affecting lifespan regulation and oxidative stress resistance, the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) gene methuselah (mth) plays important roles in the life history of Drosophila melanogaster. Substantial progress has been made in elucidating the molecular pathways by which mth affects these traits, yet conflicting ideas exist as to how old these genetic interactions are as well as how old the mth gene itself is. Root to these issues is the complex gene family history of the Mth/Mthl GPCR family, which experienced independent expansions in a variety of animal clades, leading to at least six subfamilies in insects...
January 11, 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28217903/an-evo-devo-perspective-on-multicellular-development-of-myxobacteria
#14
REVIEW
Juan A Arias Del Angel, Ana E Escalante, León Patricio Martínez-Castilla, Mariana Benítez
The transition to multicellularity, recognized as one the major transitions in evolution, has occurred independently several times. While multicellular development has been extensively studied in zygotic organisms including plant and animal groups, just a few aggregative multicellular organisms have been employed as model organisms for the study of multicellularity. Studying different evolutionary origins and modes of multicellularity enables comparative analyses that can help identifying lineage-specific aspects of multicellular evolution and generic factors and mechanisms involved in the transition to multicellularity...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120453/change-of-fate-and-staminodial-laminarity-as-potential-agents-of-floral-diversification-in-the-zingiberales
#15
Alma PIñeyro-Nelson, Ana Maria Rocha De Almeida, Chodon Sass, William James Donaldson Iles, Chelsea Dvorak Specht
The evolution of floral morphology in the monocot order Zingiberales shows a trend in which androecial whorl organs are progressively modified into variously conspicuous "petaloid" structures with differing degrees of fertility. Petaloidy of androecial members results from extensive laminarization of an otherwise radially symmetric structure. The genetic basis of the laminarization of androecial members has been addressed through recent candidate gene studies focused on understanding the spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes known to be necessary to floral organ formation...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28032453/deviating-from-the-norm-peculiarities-of-aplysia-cf-californica-early-cleavage-compared-to-traditional-spiralian-models
#16
Yolanda E Chávez-Viteri, Federico D Brown, Oscar D Pérez
Spiralia represents one of the main clades of bilaterally symmetrical metazoans (Bilateria). This group is of particular interest due to the remarkable conservation of its early developmental pattern despite of the high diversity of larval and adult body plans. Variations during embryogenesis are considered powerful tools to determine ancestral and derived characters under a phylogenetic framework. By direct observation of embryos cultured in vitro, we analyzed the early cleavage of the euopisthobranchs Aplysia cf...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862964/morphological-and-molecular-analyses-of-an-anatomical-novelty-the-pelvic-fin-filaments-of-the-south-american-lungfish
#17
Sergio Q Lima, Carinne M Costa, Chris T Amemiya, Igor Schneider
The pelvic fins of male South American lungfish, Lepidosiren paradoxa, are adorned with a distinctive array of filaments, which grow and become highly vascularized during the breeding season. The resemblance between these pelvic fin filaments (PFFs) and external gills of other vertebrates suggested that this gill-like structure was used for physiological gas exchange. It has been proposed that the unique pelvic fin of male L. paradoxa is used for release of oxygen from its blood into the environment in order to aerate its nesting brood, or, conversely, as an auxiliary respiratory organ by absorbing oxygen from the environment into its bloodstream...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27781385/an-epigenetic-perspective-on-the-midwife-toad-experiments-of-paul-kammerer-1880-1926
#18
REVIEW
Alexander O Vargas, Quirin Krabichler, Carlos Guerrero-Bosagna
Paul Kammerer was the most outstanding neo-Lamarckian experimentalist of the early 20th century. He reported spectacular results in the midwife toad, including crosses of environmentally modified toads with normal toads, where acquired traits were inherited in Mendelian fashion. Accusations of fraud generated a great scandal, ending with Kammerer's suicide. Controversy reignited in the 1970s, when journalist Arthur Koestler argued against these accusations. Since then, others have argued that Kammerer's results, even if real, were not groundbreaking and could be explained by somatic plasticity, inadvertent selection, or conventional genetics...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27659033/heterochrony-and-morphological-variation-of-epithalamic-asymmetry
#19
REVIEW
Iskra A Signore, Miguel L Concha
Heterochrony is one proposed mechanism to explain how morphological variation and novelty arise during evolution. To experimentally approach heterochrony in a comprehensive manner, we must consider all three aspects of developmental time (sequence, timing, duration). This task is only possible in developmental models that allow the acquisition of high-quality temporal data in the context of normalized developmental time. Here we propose that epithalamic asymmetry of teleosts is one such model. Comparative studies among related teleost species have revealed heterochronic shifts in the timing of ontogenic events leading to the development of epithalamic asymmetry...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27658924/toward-an-understanding-of-divergent-compound-eye-development-in-drones-and-workers-of-the-honeybee-apis-mellifera-l-a-correlative-analysis-of-morphology-and-gene-expression
#20
David S Marco Antonio, Klaus Hartfelder
Eye development in insects is best understood in Drosophila melanogaster, but little is known for other holometabolous insects. Combining a morphological with a gene expression analysis, we investigated eye development in the honeybee, putting emphasis on the sex-specific differences in eye size. Optic lobe development starts from an optic lobe anlage in the larval brain, which sequentially gives rise to the lobula, medulla, and lamina. The lamina differentiates in the last larval instar, when it receives optic nerve projections from the developing retina...
January 2017: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
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