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Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752330/a-small-step-closer-but-not-yet-there-oral-anti-xa-agents-and-the-treatment-of-cancer-associated-venous-thromboembolism
#1
Andrew D Leavitt
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752329/role-of-molecular-profiling-in-soft-tissue-sarcoma
#2
REVIEW
Timothy Lindsay, Sujana Movva
Diagnosis and treatment of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is a particularly daunting task, largely due to the profound heterogeneity that characterizes these malignancies. Molecular profiling has emerged as a useful tool to confirm histologic diagnoses and more accurately classify these malignancies. Recent large-scale, multiplatform analyses have begun the work of establishing a more complete understanding of molecular profiling in STS subtypes and to identify new molecular alterations that may guide the development of novel targeted therapies...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752328/soft-tissue-sarcoma-version-2-2018-nccn-clinical-practice-guidelines-in-oncology
#3
Margaret von Mehren, R Lor Randall, Robert S Benjamin, Sarah Boles, Marilyn M Bui, Kristen N Ganjoo, Suzanne George, Ricardo J Gonzalez, Martin J Heslin, John M Kane, Vicki Keedy, Edward Kim, Henry Koon, Joel Mayerson, Martin McCarter, Sean V McGarry, Christian Meyer, Zachary S Morris, Richard J O'Donnell, Alberto S Pappo, I Benjamin Paz, Ivy A Petersen, John D Pfeifer, Richard F Riedel, Bernice Ruo, Scott Schuetze, William D Tap, Jeffrey D Wayne, Mary Anne Bergman, Jillian L Scavone
Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for STS provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752327/adherence-to-guidelines-for-breast-surveillance-in-breast-cancer-survivors
#4
Kathryn J Ruddy, Lindsey Sangaralingham, Rachel A Freedman, Sarah Mougalian, Heather Neuman, Caprice Greenberg, Ahmedin Jemal, Narjust Duma, Tufia C Haddad, Valerie Lemaine, Karthik Ghosh, Tina J Hieken, Katie Hunt, Celine Vachon, Cary Gross, Nilay D Shah
Background: Guidelines recommend annual mammography after curative-intent treatment for breast cancer. The goal of this study was to assess contemporary patterns of breast imaging after breast cancer treatment. Methods: Administrative claims data were used to identify privately insured and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries with nonmetastatic breast cancer who had residual breast tissue (not bilateral mastectomy) after breast surgery between January 2005 and May 2015. We calculated the proportion of patients who had a mammogram, MRI, both, or neither during each of 5 subsequent 13-month periods...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752326/genetic-counseling-referral-rates-in-long-term-survivors-of-triple-negative-breast-cancer
#5
Carlos H Barcenas, Maryam N Shafaee, Arup K Sinha, Akshara Raghavendra, Babita Saigal, Rashmi K Murthy, Ashley H Woodson, Banu Arun
Background: Inherited BRCA gene mutations (pathogenic variants) cause 10% of breast cancers. BRCA pathogenic variants predispose carriers to triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC); around 30% of patients with TNBC carry BRCA pathogenic variants. The 2018 NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian recommend genetic counseling referrals for patients with TNBC diagnosed at age ≤60 years. This study sought to describe genetic counseling referral patterns among long-term TNBC survivors at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752325/sequential-versus-concurrent-chemoradiation-therapy-by-surgical-margin-status-in-resected-non-small-cell-lung-cancer
#6
Vivek Verma, Amy C Moreno, Waqar Haque, Penny Fang, Steven H Lin
Background: Postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be delivered sequentially (sCRT) or concurrently (cCRT). Without high-volume data, current guidelines recommend either option for patients with negative margins (M-) and cCRT for those with positive margins (M+). In this study, survival was compared between sCRT versus cCRT for M- and M+ disease; survival in patients who underwent sCRT was also assessed with chemotherapy-first versus radiotherapy (RT)-first. Methods: The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with primary NSCLC undergoing surgery followed by CRT...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752324/dances-with-denial-have-medical-oncology-outpatients-conveyed-their-end-of-life-wishes-and-do-they-want-to
#7
Amy Waller, Charles Douglas, Rob Sanson-Fisher, Nicholas Zdenkowski, Angela Pearce, Tiffany Evans, Justin Walsh
Objectives: This study surveyed a sample of medical oncology outpatients to determine (1) the proportion who have already discussed and documented their end-of-life (EOL) wishes; (2) when and with whom they would prefer to convey their EOL wishes; (3) the EOL issues they would want to discuss; and (4) the association between perceived cancer status and advance care planning (ACP) participation. Methods: Adult medical oncology outpatients were approached in the waiting room of an Australian tertiary treatment center...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752323/effectiveness-and-safety-of-rivaroxaban-in-patients-with-cancer-associated-venous-thrombosis
#8
Christine G Kohn, Gary H Lyman, Jan Beyer-Westendorf, Alex C Spyropoulos, Thomas J Bunz, William L Baker, Daniel Eriksson, Anna-Katharina Meinecke, Craig I Coleman
Background: Although not designated as guideline-recommended first-line anticoagulation therapy, patients are receiving rivaroxaban for the treatment and secondary prevention of cancer-associated venous thrombosis (CAT). We sought to estimate the cumulative incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE), major bleeding, and mortality/hospice care in patients with CAT treated with outpatient rivaroxaban in routine practice. Methods: Using US MarketScan claims data from January 2012 through June 2015, we identified adults with active cancer (using SEER program coding) who had ≥1 primary hospitalization or emergency department discharge diagnosis code for VTE (index event) and received rivaroxaban as their first outpatient anticoagulant within 30 days of the index VTE...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752322/nccn-guidelines-insights-head-and-neck-cancers-version-1-2018
#9
A Dimitrios Colevas, Sue S Yom, David G Pfister, Sharon Spencer, David Adelstein, Douglas Adkins, David M Brizel, Barbara Burtness, Paul M Busse, Jimmy J Caudell, Anthony J Cmelak, David W Eisele, Moon Fenton, Robert L Foote, Jill Gilbert, Maura L Gillison, Robert I Haddad, Wesley L Hicks, Ying J Hitchcock, Antonio Jimeno, Debra Leizman, Ellie Maghami, Loren K Mell, Bharat B Mittal, Harlan A Pinto, John A Ridge, James Rocco, Cristina P Rodriguez, Jatin P Shah, Randal S Weber, Matthew Witek, Frank Worden, Weining Zhen, Jennifer L Burns, Susan D Darlow
The NCCN Guidelines for Head and Neck (H&N) Cancers provide treatment recommendations for cancers of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, ethmoid and maxillary sinuses, and salivary glands. Recommendations are also provided for occult primary of the H&N, and separate algorithms have been developed by the panel for very advanced H&N cancers. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel's discussion and most recent recommendations regarding evaluation and treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752321/redefining-quality-measurement-in-cancer-care
#10
Elizabeth A Nardi, James McCanney, Katy Winckworth-Prejsnar, Alyssa A Schatz, Kerin Adelson, Marcus Neubauer, Mary Lou Smith, Ronald Walters, Robert W Carlson
Quality measurement in oncology is increasing in significance as payment schemes shift from volume to value. As demand for quality measures increases, challenges in the development of quality measures, standardization across measures, and the limitations of health information technology have become apparent. Moreover, the time and financial burden associated with developing, tracking, and reporting quality measures are substantial. Despite these challenges, best practices and leaders in the field of quality measurement in oncology have emerged...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752320/rediagnosis-of-lung-cancer-as-nut-midline-carcinoma-based-on-clues-from-tumor-genomic-profiling
#11
Alexander S Baras, Jarushka Naidoo, Christine L Hann, Peter B Illei, Charles W Reninger, Josh Lauring
Tumor DNA sequencing can identify rare driver genomic alterations that suggest targets for cancer therapy, even when these drivers cannot be suspected on clinical grounds. In some cases, genomic alterations identified in the tumor can lead to a change in diagnosis with implications for prognosis and therapy. This report describes a case in which evaluation of tumor sequencing results by a molecular tumor board (MTB) led to rediagnosis of a non-small cell lung cancer as highly aggressive NUT midline carcinoma, with implications for targeted therapy using an investigational bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) inhibitor...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752319/misdiagnosis-of-li-fraumeni-syndrome-in-a-patient-with-clonal-hematopoiesis-and-a-somatic-tp53-mutation
#12
Rachel L Mitchell, Cory Kosche, Kelly Burgess, Shreya Wadhwa, Lela Buckingham, Ritu Ghai, Jacob Rotmensch, Oleksandra Klapko, Lydia Usha
Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare genetic disorder that confers a high risk of developing certain malignancies at a young age. It is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is typically diagnosed by sequencing this gene in blood cells. The presence of a mutation in approximately half of the DNA reads (allelic fraction of 50%) is an indicator of a germline mutation, such as that in LFS. Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) is an expansion of a hematopoietic clone containing a somatic driver mutation with a low allelic fraction, usually not more than 10% to 20%...
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752318/pacific-an-ocean-of-hope-in-patients-with-stage-iii-unresectable-non-small-cell-lung-cancer
#13
Dipesh Uprety, David E Marinier
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752317/getting-into-the-weeds
#14
Margaret Tempero
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29632063/braf-targeted-therapy-in-the-treatment-of-braf-mutant-high-grade-gliomas-in-adults
#15
Tanner M Johanns, George Ansstas, Sonika Dahiya
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29632062/nccn-guidelines-as-a-model-of-extended-criteria-for-lung-cancer-screening
#16
Brady J McKee, Shawn Regis, Andrea K Borondy-Kitts, Jeffrey A Hashim, Robert J French, Christoph Wald, Andrea B McKee
Background: This review assessed the performance of patients in NCCN high-risk group 2 in a clinical CT lung screening (CTLS) program. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed screening results for all patients from our institution undergoing clinical CTLS from January 2012 through December 2016, with follow-up through June 2017. To qualify for screening, patients had to meet the NCCN Guidelines high-risk criteria for CTLS, have a physician order for screening, be asymptomatic, be lung cancer-free for 5 years, and have no known metastatic disease...
April 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29632061/lung-cancer-screening-version-3-2018-nccn-clinical-practice-guidelines-in-oncology
#17
Douglas E Wood, Ella A Kazerooni, Scott L Baum, George A Eapen, David S Ettinger, Lifang Hou, David M Jackman, Donald Klippenstein, Rohit Kumar, Rudy P Lackner, Lorriana E Leard, Inga T Lennes, Ann N C Leung, Samir S Makani, Pierre P Massion, Peter Mazzone, Robert E Merritt, Bryan F Meyers, David E Midthun, Sudhakar Pipavath, Christie Pratt, Chakravarthy Reddy, Mary E Reid, Arnold J Rotter, Peter B Sachs, Matthew B Schabath, Mark L Schiebler, Betty C Tong, William D Travis, Benjamin Wei, Stephen C Yang, Kristina M Gregory, Miranda Hughes
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States and worldwide. Early detection of lung cancer is an important opportunity for decreasing mortality. Data support using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest to screen select patients who are at high risk for lung cancer. Lung screening is covered under the Affordable Care Act for individuals with high-risk factors. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) covers annual screening LDCT for appropriate Medicare beneficiaries at high risk for lung cancer if they also receive counseling and participate in shared decision-making before screening...
April 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29632060/medical-care-costs-associated-with-cancer-in-integrated-delivery-systems
#18
Matthew P Banegas, K Robin Yabroff, Maureen C O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Debra P Ritzwoller, Paul A Fishman, Ramzi G Salloum, Jennifer Elston Lafata, Mark C Hornbrook
Background: The high economic burden of cancer is projected to continue growing. Cost-of-care estimates are key inputs for comparative effectiveness and economic analyses that aim to inform policies associated with cancer care. Existing estimates are based largely on SEER-Medicare data in the elderly, leaving a knowledge gap regarding costs for patients aged <65 years. Methods: We estimated total and net medical care costs using data on individuals diagnosed with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer (n=45,522) and noncancer controls (n=314,887) enrolled in 1 of 4 participating health plans...
April 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29632059/high-variability-in-lymph-node-counts-among-an-international-cohort-of-pathologists-questioning-the-scientific-validity-of-node-counts
#19
John P Sherbeck, Lili Zhao, Richard W Lieberman
Background: The enumeration of lymph nodes (LNs) from surgical specimens plays a critical role in the staging of patients with cancer. LN count (LNC) can affect prognosis, staging, adequacy of resection, and/or eligibility for clinical trials. However, there is no standard method for counting LNs. Most studies in the literature site the pathology report as the source of LN data, without discussion of the counting criteria. Patients and Methods: Four microscopic slides from separate pelvic LN dissections were digitally scanned and uploaded with their gross descriptions to an online library and an online survey...
April 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29632058/treating-second-breast-events-after-breast-conserving-surgery-for-ductal-carcinoma-in-situ
#20
Michael J Hassett, Wei Jiang, Melissa E Hughes, Stephen Edge, Sara H Javid, Joyce C Niland, Richard Theriault, Yu-Ning Wong, Deborah Schrag, Rinaa S Punglia
Background: Because of screening mammography, the number of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) survivors has increased dramatically. DCIS survivors may face excess risk of second breast events (SBEs). However, little is known about SBE treatment or its relationship to initial DCIS care. Methods: Among a prospective cohort of women who underwent breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for DCIS from 1997 to 2008 at institutions participating in the NCCN Outcomes Database, we identified SBEs, described patterns of care for SBEs, and examined the association between DCIS treatment choice and SBE care...
April 2018: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN
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