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Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959359/letters-to-the-editor
#1
M N Lowenthal, A J Larner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959358/van-helmont-s-proposal-for-a-randomised-comparison-of-treating-fevers-with-or-without-bloodletting-and-purging
#2
I M Donaldson
Around the year 1643, Joan Baptista van Helmont, a Flemish chemist, alchemist and physician who had devised what he claimed to be a new form of medicine, proposed a 'challenge' to traditional Galenic physicians to compare treatment of fever by traditional methods and by a regime which did not involve bloodletting and purging. Two groups of patients were to be treated and 'casting of lots' was to be used - in some way not specified in detail - to decide who received which treatment. This 'challenge' has been regarded as the first proposal for the use of randomisation in a clinical trial...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959357/penicillin-promise-problems-and-practice-in-wartime-edinburgh
#3
S Gardiner
While medical historians have paid ample attention to the introduction of antibiotics and their impact on hospital-based practice during and after the Second World War, the multiple issues surrounding their use in Scottish hospitalsare sorely lacking in current discussions. Drawing on an extensive yet underused range of materials including patient treatment records, oral histories and medical correspondence, this paper explores the introduction of penicillin for civilian treatment at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh during the closing stages of the War...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959356/a-history-of-edinburgh-s-medical-museums
#4
S J Alberti
Edinburgh has a wealth of medical collections, thanks not only to its role in the Enlightenment and the diaspora of graduates from the large medical school, but also to recent developments in medical heritage. Concentrating on the collections of the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Department and Surgeons' Hall Museums at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, this paper charts the complex and connected histories of the material culture of anatomy, pathology and surgery in the city. What roles did museums play, from their 18th century origins to their 21st century resurgence, and who used them?...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959355/embarking-on-a-research-project%C3%A2-or-research-for-the-absolute-novice
#5
L Wiblin, I Sleeman, D Burn
Research can be a difficult area for the novice to break into. A number of different obstacles face the new researcher, starting with selecting a suitable supervisor, writing a workable protocol and obtaining permissions from all the relevant organisations. This beginner's guide walks the fledging researcher through the required steps, including formulating a research question, designing a protocol and completing the Integrated Research Application System form to obtain the required permissions. The aim is to demystify the terms used in research and expose some of the pitfalls the authors experienced so that others can avoid them! Although challenges can arise throughout the research process, we aim to help you get underway...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959354/delivering-comprehensive-geriatric-assessment-in-new-settings-advice-for-frontline-clinicians
#6
J R Gladman
Over the decades, as the principles of comprehensive geriatric assessment have been established, there have been attempts to apply its principles to settings other than acute hospital medical wards or the general communitydwelling older population, for example, to other settings where older people with infirmity are found. The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect upon the application of and evidence for comprehensive geriatric assessment in these new settings and give some advice to clinicians about how to optimise their contributions to these processes...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959353/a-new-frontier-in-dementia-differential-diagnosis
#7
A J Larner, R M Bracewell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959352/have-the-testosterone-trials-demonstrated-the-effectiveness-of-testosterone-therapy-in-older-men-without-classical-hypogonadism
#8
E H Gan, R Quinton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959351/fatal-haemorrhage-following-fine-needle-aspiration-of-the-thyroid
#9
M W Strachan, M Dalvi, R Ainsworth, F W Gibb, H Horsfall, D Patel
Fine needle aspiration is routinely performed as part of the assessment of thyroid nodules. It is generally regarded as a very safe procedure, though rarely significant bleeding can occur in its aftermath. A 79-year-old female was referred for assessment of an incidental thyroid nodule which had been identified on computed tomography of the chest and extended into the retrosternal space. The patient was referred for fine needle aspiration under ultrasound guidance. Three passes were made with a 25 gauge needle into the nodule; a haemorrhagic aspirate was obtained and sent for cytological examination...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959350/progressive-multifocal-leukoencephalopathy-associated-with-infliximab
#10
L Sammut, D Wallis, C Holroyd
A 69-year-old female with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis presented with progressive cognitive decline following treatment with infliximab and methotrexate. Cranial MRI showed non-enhancing white matter signal abnormality consistent with demyelination was seen in the antero-inferior left frontal lobe extending into the frontal opercular white matter and into the left temporal lobe white matter. Similar appearances were seen in the inferomedial right frontal lobe. Brain biopsy showed histological changes consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959349/an-unusual-cause-of-falls-in-a-young-woman
#11
I Sleeman, L Wiblin, D Burn
Nitrous oxide is commonly used as an analgesic and anaesthetic agent. Nitrous oxide is also in use in industry as an aerosol propellant and is now recognised as a recreational drug whose use is growing, especially among the young. Nitrous oxide from whipped cream canisters is inhaled to produce a dissociative, intoxicated state. Nitrous oxide is known to inactivate vitamin B12 via oxidation, which can precipitate a demyelinating myelopathy akin to the classical B12 deficiency syndrome, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959348/seven-cases-of-sigmoid-volvulus-in-parkinson-s-disease
#12
S Blackley, C Maguire, T Daniels
Non-motor features of Parkinson's disease are receiving greater recognition. Constipation affects up to 50% of patients with Parkinson's disease and sigmoid volvulus remains an under recognised complication with mortality rates up to 50%. The incidence of sigmoid volvulus in the general population is 1.7/100,000/year. The specific incidence in Parkinson's disease is not known; however, this case series suggests that it is noticeably more than in the general population at 100/100,000/year. This paper highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of constipation to prevent volvulus developing and thevarious treatments currently available...
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959347/antimicrobial-resistance-are-we-at-the-dawn-of-the-post-antibiotic-era
#13
D N Williams
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959346/valuing-our-trainees-the-future-of-medicine-in-the-uk
#14
K E Walesby, M J Lyall, T W Mackay, B Wood, D Bell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929581/smellie-hunter-atlases-of-the-gravid-uterus-part-2
#15
I M Donaldson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929580/medical-nemesis-40-years-on-the-enduring-legacy-of-ivan-illich
#16
S O'Mahony
Ivan Illich's attack on modern medicine, Medical Nemesis, appeared in 1974. The book famously opened with the statement: 'The medical establishment has become a major threat to health.' Forty years after its publication, this paper examines the major themes of the book, and asks whether events since its publication have added weight to Illich's thesis.
June 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929579/-%C3%A2-to-whom-it-will-be-extremly-usefull-dr-william-cullen-s-adoption-of-james-watt-s-copying-machine
#17
H Wheelock
Dr William Cullen (1710-1790) was a leading physician of the Enlightenment era. As professor in Edinburgh he became the most influential teacher of theoretical and practical medicine in 18th century Britain. A renowned private practitioner, Cullen systematically archived his postal 'consultations', now held by the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. Initially Cullen preserved his replies as transcriptions, but from April 1781 he began using a mechanical copier, newly devised by the Scottish engineer James Watt...
June 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929578/-any-style-but-gothic-building-a-home-for-the-royal-college-of-physicians-of-ireland
#18
H Wheelock
On 15 July 1864 the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland held its first business meeting in its newly built home at 6 Kildare Street, Dublin. Although the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland had been in existence for over 200 years this was the first occasion that a College meeting had been held in a building owned by the College. This paper looks at the history behind the construction of a home for the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. It will examine why it took over 200 years for the Physicians to find a permanent home, how they ended up with the building they did, and what they borrowed from the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh in the process...
June 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929577/a-practical-approach-to-the-new-oral-anticoagulants-used-for-stroke-prevention-in-patients-with-atrial-fibrillation
#19
S Bashir, A Al-Mohammed, S Gupta
This review evaluates the research undertaken in the last six years on the use of new oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and provides evidence-based answers to common clinical questions. Two types of new oral anticoagulants - direct thrombin (IIa) inhibitors, and Xa inhibitors - are currently available. These drugs have similar pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. They are more predictable than, though in many respects comparable to, warfarin. They do not require frequent laboratory tests, nor do they have a narrow therapeutic window...
June 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929576/empathy-can-it-be-taught
#20
D Jeffrey, R Downie
There is now a societal and cultural expectation that doctors and nurses should feel, and display, empathy for their patients. Many commentators argue that medical and nursing students should be taught empathy. Empathy, however, is difficult to define: it is not the same as kindness, as it implies a degree of psychological insight into what the patient is thinking or feeling. Empathy is seen by some as a form of emotional intelligence that can be systematically developed through teaching and positive role models...
June 2016: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
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