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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508130/atmospheric-conditions-create-freeways-detours-and-tailbacks-for-migrating-birds
#1
Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Felix Liechti, Wouter M G Vansteelant
The extraordinary adaptations of birds to contend with atmospheric conditions during their migratory flights have captivated ecologists for decades. During the 21st century technological advances have sparked a revival of research into the influence of weather on migrating birds. Using biologging technology, flight behaviour is measured across entire flyways, weather radar networks quantify large-scale migratory fluxes, citizen scientists gather observations of migrant birds and mechanistic models are used to simulate migration in dynamic aerial environments...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500442/drosophila-rhodopsin-7-can-partially-replace-the-structural-role-of-rhodopsin-1-but-not-its-physiological-function
#2
Rudi Grebler, Christa Kistenpfennig, Dirk Rieger, Joachim Bentrop, Stephan Schneuwly, Pingkalai R Senthilan, Charlotte Helfrich-Förster
Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7), a new invertebrate Rhodopsin gene, was discovered in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster in 2000 and thought to encode for a functional Rhodopsin protein. Indeed, Rh7 exhibits most hallmarks of the known Rhodopsins, except for the G-protein-activating QAKK motif in the third cytoplasmic loop that is absent in Rh7. Here, we show that Rh7 can partially substitute Rh1 in the outer receptor cells (R1-6) for rhabdomere maintenance, but that it cannot activate the phototransduction cascade in these cells...
May 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500441/route-simulations-compass-mechanisms-and-long-distance-migration-flights-in-birds
#3
REVIEW
Susanne Åkesson, Giuseppe Bianco
Bird migration has fascinated humans for centuries and routes crossing the globe are now starting to be revealed by advanced tracking technology. A central question is what compass mechanism, celestial or geomagnetic, is activated during these long flights. Different approaches based on the geometry of flight routes across the globe and route simulations based on predictions from compass mechanisms with or without including the effect of winds have been used to try to answer this question with varying results...
May 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497254/9-phenanthrol-modulates-postinhibitory-rebound-and-afterhyperpolarizing-potentials-in-an-excitatory-motor-neuron-of-the-medicinal-leech
#4
James D Angstadt, Joshua R Giordano, Alexander J Goncalves
Postinhibitory rebound (PIR) responses in leech dorsal excitatory motor neurons (cell DE-3) are eliminated by Ca(2+) channel blockers but also exhibit a strong dependence on extracellular Na(+). These features could be explained by a voltage-gated Ca(2+) current acting in concert with a Ca(2+)-activated nonspecific current (ICAN). In vertebrates, ICAN is associated with TRPM4 channels which are blocked selectively by 9-phenanthrol. Here, we show that 9-phenanthrol selectively inhibits a late phase of PIR and simultaneously enhances afterhyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs)...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497253/effects-of-juvenile-hormone-analogue-methoprene-and-20-hydroxyecdysone-on-reproduction-in-polygonia-c-aureum-lepidoptera-nymphalidae-in-relation-to-adult-diapause
#5
Satoshi Hiroyoshi, Gadi V P Reddy, Jun Mitsuhashi
We investigated the effects of juvenile hormone analogue (methoprene) and 20-hydroxyecdysone on female and male reproduction in a nymphalid butterfly, Polygonia c-aureum. This butterfly has a facultative adult diapause controlled by the corpora allata and brain. Methoprene seems to terminate reproductive diapause, although transplantation experiments indicate that the activity of the corpora allata does not affect male mating behavior Endo (Dev Growth Differ 15:1-10, 1973a), suggesting that the brain may be involved in diapause...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28488067/attachment-ability-of-the-southern-green-stink-bug-nezara-viridula-heteroptera-pentatomidae
#6
Gianandrea Salerno, Manuela Rebora, Elena Gorb, Alexander Kovalev, Stanislav Gorb
The present paper characterizes the attachment ability of males and females of Nezara viridula (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) on artificial surfaces (smooth hydrophilic, smooth hydrophobic, different surface roughness) and on both leaf surfaces of the typical host plant species Vicia faba, using a centrifugal force tester and a traction force experiments set up. N. viridula is a serious crop pest in the world and shows attachment devices different from the so far investigated Heteroptera, with a tarsus characterized by distal smooth flexible pulvilli combined with claws and proximal ventral hairy pad...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478535/why-background-colour-matters-to-bees-and-flowers
#7
Zoë Bukovac, Mani Shrestha, Jair E Garcia, Martin Burd, Alan Dorin, Adrian G Dyer
Flowers are often viewed by bee pollinators against a variety of different backgrounds. On the Australian continent, backgrounds are very diverse and include surface examples of all major geological stages of the Earth's history, which have been present during the entire evolutionary period of Angiosperms. Flower signals in Australia are also representative of typical worldwide evolutionary spectral adaptations that enable successful pollination. We measured the spectral properties of 581 natural surfaces, including rocks, sand, green leaves, and dry plant materials, sampled from tropical Cairns through to the southern tip of mainland Australia...
May 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447200/skyline-retention-and-retroactive-interference-in-the-navigating-australian-desert-ant-melophorus-bagoti
#8
Cody A Freas, Christopher Whyte, Ken Cheng
Visual cues commonly aid solitary foraging ants. Specifically, foragers can use the skyline where terrestrial landmarks meet the sky. Foraging ants show a remarkable affinity to retain these terrestrial cues, developing lifelong memories of the nest site panorama. Here we explore foragers' ability to retain skyline cues of resource locations at some distance from the nest through experiments with artificial skylines erected around a resource location. We also tested the foragers' memories of one skyline at several time points after the skyline was replaced by a different one...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429124/how-bumblebees-use-lateral-and-ventral-optic-flow-cues-for-position-control-in-environments-of-different-proximity
#9
Nellie Linander, Emily Baird, Marie Dacke
Flying insects frequently navigate through environments of different complexity. In this study, buff-tailed bumblebees (Bombus terrestris L.) were trained to fly along tunnels of different widths, from 60 to 240 cm. In tunnel widths of 60 and 120 cm, bumblebees control their lateral position by balancing the magnitude of translational optic flow experienced in the lateral visual field of each eye. In wider tunnels, bumblebees use translational optic flow cues in the ventral visual field to control their lateral position and to steer along straight tracks...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421281/hearing-diversity-in-moths-confronting-a-neotropical-bat-assemblage
#10
Ariadna Cobo-Cuan, Manfred Kössl, Emanuel C Mora
The tympanal ear is an evolutionary acquisition which helps moths survive predation from bats. The greater diversity of bats and echolocation strategies in the Neotropics compared with temperate zones would be expected to impose different sensory requirements on the neotropical moths. However, even given some variability among moth assemblages, the frequencies of best hearing of moths from different climate zones studied to date have been roughly the same: between 20 and 60 kHz. We have analyzed the auditory characteristics of tympanate moths from Cuba, a neotropical island with high levels of bat diversity and a high incidence of echolocation frequencies above those commonly at the upper limit of moths' hearing sensitivity...
April 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405761/adaptive-responses-of-peripheral-lateral-line-nerve-fibres-to-sinusoidal-wave-stimuli
#11
Joachim Mogdans, Christina Müller, Maren Frings, Ferdinand Raap
Sensory adaptation is characterized by a reduction in the firing frequency of neurons to prolonged stimulation, also called spike frequency adaptation. This has been documented for sensory neurons of the visual, olfactory, electrosensory, and auditory system both in response to constant-amplitude and to sinusoidal stimuli, but has thus far not been described systematically for the lateral line system. We recorded neuronal activity from primary afferent nerve fibres in the lateral line in goldfish in response to sinusoidal wave stimuli...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401311/development-of-site-fidelity-in-the-nocturnal-amblypygid-phrynus-marginemaculatus
#12
Jacob M Graving, Verner P Bingman, Eileen A Hebets, Daniel D Wiegmann
Amblypygids are capable of navigation in the complex terrain of rainforests in near complete darkness. Path integration is unnecessary for successful homing, and the alternative mechanisms by which they navigate have yet to be elucidated. Here, our aims were to determine whether the amblypygid Phrynus marginemaculatus could be trained to reliably return to a target shelter in a laboratory arena-indicating goal recognition-and to document changes in behavior associated with the development of fidelity. We recorded nocturnal movements and space use by individuals over five nights in an arena in which subjects were provided with two shelters that differed in quality...
April 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28365788/the-magnetic-map-sense-and-its-use-in-fine-tuning-the-migration-programme-of-birds
#13
REVIEW
D Heyers, D Elbers, M Bulte, F Bairlein, H Mouritsen
The Earth's magnetic field is one of several natural cues, which migratory birds can use to derive directional ("compass") information for orientation on their biannual migratory journeys. Moreover, magnetic field effects on prominent aspects of the migratory programme of birds, such as migratory restlessness behaviour, fuel deposition and directional orientation, implicate that geomagnetic information can also be used to derive positional ("map") information. While the magnetic "compass" in migratory birds is likely to be based on radical pair-forming molecules embedded in their visual system, the sensory correlates underlying a magnetic "map" sense currently remain elusive...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361169/magnetic-activation-in-the-brain-of-the-migratory-northern-wheatear-oenanthe-oenanthe
#14
D Elbers, M Bulte, F Bairlein, H Mouritsen, D Heyers
Behavioural and neurobiological evidence suggests the involvement of the visual and trigeminal sensory systems in avian magnetoreception. The constantly growing array of new genetic approaches becoming available to scientists would bear great potential to contribute to a generally accepted understanding of the mechanisms underlying this ability, but would require to breed migratory birds in captivity. Here we show that the transcontinental night-migratory Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe), which is currently the only migratory songbird successfully being bred in reasonable numbers in captivity, shows magnetic-field-induced neuronal activation in the trigeminal brainstem areas receiving their input through the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361168/influence-of-leptin-and-gabab-receptor-agonist-and-antagonist-on-neurons-of-the-hypothalamic-infundibular-nucleus-in-the-chicken
#15
S Bogatyrev, K S Yakimova, B Tzschentke
In birds and mammals, the neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance is conserved in many aspects. Despite significant similarities between the two groups, differences in the regulatory mechanisms were detected. The present study was performed to carry out investigations of the influence of human leptin and GABAB-receptor agonist and antagonist on the firing rate of neurons of the Nucleus infundibuli hypothalami in brain slices from juvenile chickens. For the first time, we demonstrated a clear, dose-related change in the firing rate of hypothalamic neurons in juvenile chickens after the acute application of recombinant human leptin (1, 10, and 100 nM)...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343237/actogram-analysis-of-free-flying-migratory-birds-new-perspectives-based-on-acceleration-logging
#16
REVIEW
Johan Bäckman, Arne Andersson, Lykke Pedersen, Sissel Sjöberg, Anders P Tøttrup, Thomas Alerstam
The use of accelerometers has become an important part of biologging techniques for large-sized birds with accelerometer data providing information about flight mode, wing-beat pattern, behaviour and energy expenditure. Such data show that birds using much energy-saving soaring/gliding flight like frigatebirds and swifts can stay airborne without landing for several months. Successful accelerometer studies have recently been conducted also for free-flying small songbirds during their entire annual cycle. Here we review the principles and possibilities for accelerometer studies in bird migration...
March 25, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341866/mapping-brain-structure-and-function-cellular-resolution-global-perspective
#17
REVIEW
Günther K H Zupanc
A comprehensive understanding of the brain requires analysis, although from a global perspective, with cellular, and even subcellular, resolution. An important step towards this goal involves the establishment of three-dimensional high-resolution brain maps, incorporating brain-wide information about the cells and their connections, as well as the chemical architecture. The progress made in such anatomical brain mapping in recent years has been paralleled by the development of physiological techniques that enable investigators to generate global neural activity maps, also with cellular resolution, while simultaneously recording the organism's behavioral activity...
March 24, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332031/how-do-energy-stores-and-changes-in-these-affect-departure-decisions-by-migratory-birds-a-critical-view-on-stopover-ecology-studies-and-some-future-perspectives
#18
REVIEW
Heiko Schmaljohann, Cas Eikenaar
In birds, accumulating energy is far slower than spending energy during flight. During migration, birds spend, therefore, most of the time at stopover refueling energy used during the previous flight. This elucidates why current energy stores and actual rate of accumulating energy are likely crucial factors influencing bird's decision when to resume migration in addition to other intrinsic (sex, age) and extrinsic (predation, weather) factors modulating the decision within the innate migration program. After first summarizing how energy stores and stopover durations are generally determined, we critically review that high-energy stores and low rates of accumulating energy were significantly related to high departure probabilities in several bird groups...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315939/the-transient-potassium-outward-current-has-different-roles-in-modulating-the-pyloric-and-gastric-mill-rhythms-in-the-stomatogastric-ganglion
#19
Lin Zhu, Allen I Selverston, Joseph Ayers
The crustacean stomatogastric nervous system is a classic model for understanding the effects of modulating ionic currents and synapses at both the cell and network levels. The stomatogastric ganglion in this system contains two distinct central pattern generators: a slow gastric mill network that generates flexible rhythmic outputs (8-20 s) and is often silent, and a fast pyloric network that generates more consistent rhythmic outputs (0.5-2 s) and is always active in vitro. Different ionic conductances contribute to the properties of individual neurons and therefore to the overall dynamics of the pyloric and gastric mill networks...
March 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299428/the-avian-hippocampus-and-the-hypothetical-maps-used-by-navigating-migratory-birds-with-some-reflection-on-compasses-and-migratory-restlessness
#20
Verner P Bingman, Scott A MacDougall-Shackleton
The homology between the avian hippocampal formation (HF) and mammalian hippocampus nurtures the expectation that HF plays a fundamental role in navigation by migratory birds. Indeed, HF of migratory birds displays anatomical properties that differ from non-migratory species. Using a hypothetical framework of multiple maps of differing spatial resolution and range, homing pigeon data suggest that HF is important for navigating by landscape features near familiar breeding, over-wintering, and stop-over sites...
March 16, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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