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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213760/endocrine-regulation-of-fueling-by-hyperphagia-in-migratory-birds
#1
Cas Eikenaar
To support migratory endurance flight, birds accumulate large amounts of fat by hyperphagia (fueling). Whereas the factors influencing migrants' motivation to fuel are well described, the physiological mechanism regulating fueling is largely unknown. Hormones are likely involved and arguably the best studied with respect to food intake and fueling is corticosterone. Corticosterone has a permissive effect, as blocking the hormone's actions prohibits efficient fueling. There are no indications, though that corticosterone stimulates fueling, and some studies even observed negative correlations between corticosterone level and food intake and speed of fueling...
February 17, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197725/schema-vs-primitive-perceptual-grouping-the-relative-weighting-of-sequential-vs-spatial-cues-during-an-auditory-grouping-task-in-frogs
#2
Hamilton E Farris, Michael J Ryan
Perceptually, grouping sounds based on their sources is critical for communication. This is especially true in túngara frog breeding aggregations, where multiple males produce overlapping calls that consist of an FM 'whine' followed by harmonic bursts called 'chucks'. Phonotactic females use at least two cues to group whines and chucks: whine-chuck spatial separation and sequence. Spatial separation is a primitive cue, whereas sequence is schema-based, as chuck production is morphologically constrained to follow whines, meaning that males cannot produce the components simultaneously...
February 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28194485/detection-of-hydrodynamic-stimuli-by-the-postcranial-body-of-florida-manatees-trichechus-manatus-latirostris
#3
Joseph C Gaspard, Gordon B Bauer, David A Mann, Katharine Boerner, Laura Denum, Candice Frances, Roger L Reep
Manatees live in shallow, frequently turbid waters. The sensory means by which they navigate in these conditions are unknown. Poor visual acuity, lack of echolocation, and modest chemosensation suggest that other modalities play an important role. Rich innervation of sensory hairs that cover the entire body and enlarged somatosensory areas of the brain suggest that tactile senses are good candidates. Previous tests of detection of underwater vibratory stimuli indicated that they use passive movement of the hairs to detect particle displacements in the vicinity of a micron or less for frequencies from 10 to 150 Hz...
February 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190120/precocious-hearing-in-harbour-porpoise-neonates
#4
Magnus Wahlberg, Lara Delgado-García, Jakob H Kristensen
Hearing is the primary sensory modality for toothed whales, but it is not known at which age it is fully developed. For newborn calves, hearing could fill an important function in maintaining contact with the mother and to develop echolocation skills. We non-invasively measured the auditory brainstem response (ABR) in two neonate (age 1-4 days) and three adult harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). The stimuli consisted of clicks centred at 130 kHz, which is within the frequency band used for echolocation and communication in this species...
February 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190119/phase-locking-behavior-in-a-high-frequency-gymnotiform-weakly-electric-fish-adontosternarchus
#5
Masashi Kawasaki, John Leonard
An apteronotid weakly electric fish, Adontosternarchus, emits high-frequency electric organ discharges (700-1500 Hz) which are stable in frequency if no other fish or artificial signals are present. When encountered with an artificial signal of higher frequency than the fish's discharge, the fish raised its discharge frequency and eventually matched its own frequency to that of the artificial signal. At this moment, phase locking was observed, where the timing of the fish's discharge was precisely stabilized at a particular phase of the artificial signal over a long period of time (up to minutes) with microsecond precision...
February 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150219/sexual-response-of-male-drosophila-to-honey-bee-queen-mandibular-pheromone-implications-for-genetic-studies-of-social-insects
#6
Justin R Croft, Tom Liu, Alison L Camiletti, Anne F Simon, Graham J Thompson
Honey bees secrete a queen mandibular pheromone that renders workers reproductively altruistic and drones sexually attentive. This sex-specific function of QMP may have evolved from a sexually dimorphic signaling mechanism derived from pre-social ancestors. If so, there is potential for pre-social insects to respond to QMP, and in a manner that is comparable to its normal effect on workers and drones. Remarkably, QMP applied to female Drosophila does induce worker-like qualities [Camiletti et al. (Entomol Exp Appl 147:262, 2013)], and we here extend this comparison to examine the effects of bee pheromone on male fruit flies...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28110384/compass-systems
#7
Nikita Chernetsov
Three compass systems based on global cues known to exist in migrating birds are reviewed. Two of these systems are based on celestial cues, a time-dependent sun compass and time-independent, i.e. not involving the internal clock, star compass. The third system is the magnetic compass, based on a separate sensory modality, which currently attracts much attention from behavioural ecologists, physiologists and physicists. The complex pattern of hierarchy and interactions between these compass systems is briefly discussed...
January 21, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28105489/whisker-touch-guides-canopy-exploration-in-a-nocturnal-arboreal-rodent-the-hazel-dormouse-muscardinus-avellanarius
#8
Kendra Arkley, Guuske P Tiktak, Vicki Breakell, Tony J Prescott, Robyn A Grant
Dormouse numbers are declining in the UK due to habitat loss and fragmentation. We know that dormice are nocturnal, arboreal, and avoid crossing open spaces between habitats, yet how they navigate around their canopy is unknown. As other rodents use whisker touch sensing to navigate and explore their environment, this study investigates whether Hazel dormice (Muscardinus avellanarius) employ their whiskers to cross between habitats. We analysed high-speed video footage of dormice exploring freely in flat and climbing arenas in near darkness and using infrared light illumination...
January 20, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078425/odorant-receptors-and-antennal-lobe-morphology-offer-a-new-approach-to-understanding-olfaction-in-the-asian-longhorned-beetle
#9
Robert F Mitchell, Loyal P Hall, Peter F Reagel, Duane D McKenna, Thomas C Baker, John G Hildebrand
The Asian longhorned beetle Anoplophora glabripennis (Motchulsky) is an exotic forest pest that has repeatedly invaded North America and Europe from Asia, and has the potential to kill millions of trees and cause billions of dollars in damage. Traps baited with an attractive mixture of volatile organic compounds from hosts have been of limited success in monitoring invasion sites. We propose that lures might be improved through studying the olfactory system of adult beetles, especially the gene family of odorant receptors (ORs) and the structure of the antennal lobes of the brain...
January 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058443/-the-most-beautiful-profession-in-the-world%C3%A2-in-memoriam-klaus-kalmring-1931-2015
#10
Hannelore Hoch, Andrej Čokl, Martin Jatho, Reinhard Lakes-Harlan, Wolfgang Rössler, Oliver Stiedl
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 5, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986994/the-effects-of-a-skeletal-muscle-titin-mutation-on-walking-in-mice
#11
Cinnamon M Pace, Sarah Mortimer, Jenna A Monroy, Kiisa C Nishikawa
Titin contributes to sarcomere assembly, muscle signaling, and mechanical properties of muscle. The mdm mouse exhibits a small deletion in the titin gene resulting in dystrophic mutants and phenotypically normal heterozygotes. We examined the effects of this mutation on locomotion to assess how, and if, changes to muscle phenotype explain observed locomotor differences. Mutant mice are much smaller in size than their siblings and gait abnormalities may be driven by differences in limb proportions and/or by changes to muscle phenotype caused by the titin mutation...
December 16, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942844/referees-2016
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 10, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909789/factors-influencing-aversive-learning-in-the-oriental-fruit-fly-bactrocera-dorsalis
#13
J L Liu, H L Chen, X Y Chen, R K Cui, A Guerrero, X N Zeng
Parameters such as the intensity of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, the inter-trial interval, and starvation time can influence learning. In this study, the parameters that govern aversive learning in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, a serious pest of fruits and vegetables, were examined. Male flies were trained to associate the attractive odorant methyl eugenol, a male lure, with a food punishment, sodium chloride solution, and the conditioned suppression of the proboscis-extension response was investigated...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28005254/the-optomotor-response-of-the-praying-mantis-is-driven-predominantly-by-the-central-visual-field
#14
Vivek Nityananda, Ghaith Tarawneh, Steven Errington, Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza, Jenny Read
The optomotor response has been widely used to investigate insect sensitivity to contrast and motion. Several studies have revealed the sensitivity of this response to frequency and contrast, but we know less about the spatial integration underlying this response. Specifically, few studies have investigated how the horizontal angular extent of stimuli influences the optomotor response. We presented mantises with moving gratings of varying horizontal extents at three different contrasts in the central or peripheral regions of their visual fields...
January 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942807/neural-control-and-precision-of-flight-muscle-activation-in-drosophila
#15
REVIEW
Fritz-Olaf Lehmann, Jan Bartussek
Precision of motor commands is highly relevant in a large context of various locomotor behaviors, including stabilization of body posture, heading control and directed escape responses. While posture stability and heading control in walking and swimming animals benefit from high friction via ground reaction forces and elevated viscosity of water, respectively, flying animals have to cope with comparatively little aerodynamic friction on body and wings. Although low frictional damping in flight is the key to the extraordinary aerial performance and agility of flying birds, bats and insects, it challenges these animals with extraordinary demands on sensory integration and motor precision...
January 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27873005/photoreceptor-spectral-tuning-by-colorful-multilayered-facet-lenses-in-long-legged-fly-eyes-dolichopodidae
#16
D G Stavenga, A Meglič, P Pirih, H Koshitaka, K Arikawa, M F Wehling, G Belušič
The facet lenses of the compound eyes of long-legged flies (Dolichopodidae) feature a striking, interlaced coloration pattern, existing of alternating rows of green-yellow and orange-red reflecting facets, due to dielectric multilayers located distally in the facet lenses (Bernard and Miller. Invest Ophthalmol 7:416-434 (1968). We investigated this phenomenon in the dolichopodid Dolichopus nitidus by applying microspectrophotometry, electron microscopy and optical modeling. The measured narrow-band reflectance spectra, peaking at ~540 and ~590 nm with bandwidth ~105 nm, are well explained by a refractive index oscillating sinusoidally in six periods around a mean value of about 1...
January 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837238/the-flicker-fusion-frequency-of-budgerigars-melopsittacus-undulatus-revisited
#17
Jannika E Boström, Nicola K Haller, Marina Dimitrova, Anders Ödeen, Almut Kelber
While color vision and spatial resolution have been studied in many bird species, less is known about the temporal aspects of bird vision. High temporal resolution has been described in three species of passerines but it is unknown whether this is specific to passerines, to small actively flying birds, to insectivores or to birds living in bright habitats. Temporal resolution of vision is commonly tested by determining the flicker fusion frequency (FFF), at which the eye can no longer distinguish a flickering light from a constant light of equal intensity at different luminances...
January 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27796483/aerial-low-frequency-hearing-in-captive-and-free-ranging-harbour-seals-phoca-vitulina-measured-using-auditory-brainstem-responses
#18
Klaus Lucke, Gordon D Hastie, Kerstin Ternes, Bernie McConnell, Simon Moss, Deborah J F Russell, Heike Weber, Vincent M Janik
The hearing sensitivity of 18 free-ranging and 10 captive harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) to aerial sounds was measured in the presence of typical environmental noise through auditory brainstem response measurements. A focus was put on the comparative hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. Low- and mid-frequency thresholds appeared to be elevated in both captive and free-ranging seals, but this is likely due to masking effects and limitations of the methodology used. The data also showed individual variability in hearing sensitivity with probable age-related hearing loss found in two old harbour seals...
December 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885506/marsh-frogs-pelophylax-ridibundus-determine-migratory-direction-by-magnetic-field
#19
Vladimir V Shakhparonov, Sergei V Ogurtsov
Orientation by magnetic cues appears to be adaptive during animal migrations. Whereas the magnetic orientation in birds, mammals, and urodele amphibians is being investigated intensively, the data about anurans are still scarce. This study tests whether marsh frogs could determine migratory direction between the breeding pond and the wintering site by magnetic cues in the laboratory. Adult frogs (N = 32) were individually tested in the T-maze 127 cm long inside the three-axis Helmholtz coil system (diameter 3 m)...
November 24, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27878378/phonotactic-flight-of-the-parasitoid-fly-emblemasoma-auditrix-diptera-sarcophagidae
#20
Nanina Tron, Reinhard Lakes-Harlan
The parasitoid fly Emblemasoma auditrix locates its hosts using acoustic cues from sound producing males of the cicada Okanagana rimosa. Here, we experimentally analysed the flight path of the phonotaxis from a landmark to the target, a hidden loudspeaker in the field. During flight, the fly showed only small lateral deviations. The vertical flight direction angles were initially negative (directed downwards relative to starting position), grew positive (directed upwards) in the second half of the flight, and finally flattened (directed horizontally or slightly upwards), typically resulting in a landing above the loudspeaker...
November 22, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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