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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28748486/nonlinear-processing-of-a-multicomponent-communication-signal-by-combination-sensitive-neurons-in-the-anuran-inferior-colliculus
#1
Norman Lee, Katrina M Schrode, Mark A Bee
Diverse animals communicate using multicomponent signals. How a receiver's central nervous system integrates multiple signal components remains largely unknown. We investigated how female green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) integrate the multiple spectral components present in male advertisement calls. Typical calls have a bimodal spectrum consisting of formant-like low-frequency (~0.9 kHz) and high-frequency (~2.7 kHz) components that are transduced by different sensory organs in the inner ear. In behavioral experiments, only bimodal calls reliably elicited phonotaxis in no-choice tests, and they were selectively chosen over unimodal calls in two-alternative choice tests...
July 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28741079/characterization-of-the-first-order-visual-interneurons-in-the-visual-system-of-the-bumblebee-bombus-terrestris
#2
Juha Rusanen, Antti Vähäkainu, Matti Weckström, Kentaro Arikawa
The bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) has become a common model animal in the study of various aspects of vision and visually guided behavior. Although the bumblebee visual system has been studied to some extent, little is known about the functional role of the first visual neuropil, the lamina. In this work, we provide an anatomical and electrophysiological description of the first-order visual interneurons, lamina monopolar cells (LMCs), of the bumblebee. Using intracellular recording coupled with dye injection, we found that bumblebee LMCs morphologically resemble those found in the honeybee, although only the LMC type L1 cells could be morphologically matched directly between the species...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733816/relative-weighting-of-acoustic-information-during-mating-decisions-in-grasshoppers-indicates-signatures-of-sexual-selection
#3
Jan Clemens, Jennifer Aufderheide, Bernhard Ronacher
The decision with whom to mate is crucial in determining an individual's fitness and is often based on the evaluation of visual or acoustic displays produced during courtship. Accordingly, the algorithms for evaluating such courtship signals are shaped by sexual selection and should reflect the expected benefits and costs of mating: signals bearing heterospecific features should be rapidly rejected, since mating would produce no fertile offspring, while signals resembling conspecific ones should be weighted proportional to mate quality...
July 21, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28721519/variations-of-cocoon-external-lipids-during-wolf-spiderlings-development
#4
F Ruhland, S Schulz, Marie Trabalon
This study presents the first characterisation of the silk lipids of the cocoons of a wolf spider (Pardosa saltans). Wolf spiders' maternal behaviour is complex and involves guarding a cocoon for several weeks, and so cocoons must emit cues to ensure their care and the development of juveniles. We investigated cues associated with the cocoon silk. We assessed qualitative changes of the lipid contents and the composition of cocoon silk in relation to the development of P. saltans wolf spider juveniles. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of P...
July 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707159/introduction-to-the-special-issue-of-jcp-a-featuring-the-presidential-symposium-at-the-international-congress-of-neuroethology-icn2016-in-montevideo
#5
EDITORIAL
P M Narins
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28702846/characterization-of-the-encoding-properties-of-intraspinal-mechanosensory-neurons-in-the-lamprey
#6
Nicole Massarelli, Allan L Yau, Kathleen A Hoffman, Tim Kiemel, Eric D Tytell
Proprioceptive sensory inputs are an integral part of the closed-loop system of locomotion. In the lamprey, a model organism for vertebrate locomotion, such sensory inputs come from intraspinal mechanosensory cells called "edge cells". These edge cells synapse directly onto interneurons in the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) circuit and allow the CPG to adjust the motor output according to how the body is bending. However, the encoding properties of the edge cells have never been fully characterized...
July 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689296/development-of-auditory-sensitivity-in-the-barn-owl
#7
Anna Kraemer, Caitlin Baxter, Alayna Hendrix, Catherine E Carr
Adult barn owl hearing is acute, but development of this sense is not well understood. We, therefore, measured auditory brainstem responses in barn owls from before the onset of hearing (posthatch day 2, or P2) to adulthood (P69). The first consistent responses were detected at P4 for 1 and 2 kHz, followed by responses to 0.5 and 4 kHz at P9, and 5 kHz at P13. Sensitivity to higher frequencies increased with age, with responses to 12 kHz appearing about 2 months after hatching, once the facial ruff was mature...
July 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28685186/the-protein-pheromone-temptin-is-an-attractant-of-the-gastropod-biomphalaria-glabrata
#8
Emmanuel A Pila, Shauna J Peck, Patrick C Hanington
The freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has drawn much research interest by virtue of it being one of the intermediate hosts of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of human schistosomiasis. Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease that affects over 260 million people globally, particularly in tropical and sub-tropical regions. One strategy that has been proposed as a way to prevent human infection by the parasite, involves the use of pheromone traps to lure the snail host away from areas of human activity...
July 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28685185/regeneration-of-synapses-in-the-olfactory-pathway-of-locusts-after-antennal-deafferentation
#9
Hannah Wasser, Michael Stern
The olfactory pathway of the locust is capable of fast and precise regeneration on an anatomical level. Following deafferentation of the antenna either of young adult locusts, or of fifth instar nymphs, severed olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) reinnervate the antennal lobe (AL) and arborize in AL microglomeruli. In the present study we tested whether these regenerated fibers establish functional synapses again. Intracellular recordings from AL projection neurons revealed that the first few odor stimulus evoked postsynaptic responses from regenerated ORNs from day 4-7 post crush on...
July 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647753/the-bee-the-flower-and-the-electric-field-electric-ecology-and-aerial-electroreception
#10
REVIEW
Dominic Clarke, Erica Morley, Daniel Robert
Bees and flowering plants have a long-standing and remarkable co-evolutionary history. Flowers and bees evolved traits that enable pollination, a process that is as important to plants as it is for pollinating insects. From the sensory ecological viewpoint, bee-flower interactions rely on senses such as vision, olfaction, humidity sensing, and touch. Recently, another sensory modality has been unveiled; the detection of the weak electrostatic field that arises between a flower and a bee. Here, we present our latest understanding of how these electric interactions arise and how they contribute to pollination and electroreception...
June 24, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616653/bird-migration
#11
EDITORIAL
Franz Bairlein, Wolfgang Wiltschko
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612236/using-optogenetics-to-assess-neuroendocrine-modulation-of-heart-rate-in-drosophila-melanogaster-larvae
#12
Cole Malloy, Jacob Sifers, Angela Mikos, Aya Samadi, Aya Omar, Christina Hermanns, Robin L Cooper
The Drosophila melanogaster heart has become a principal model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. While the morphology of the heart in Drosophila and mammals is different, many of the molecular mechanisms that underlie heart development and function are similar and function can be assessed by similar physiological measurements, such as cardiac output, rate, and time in systole or diastole. Here, we have utilized an intact, optogenetic approach to assess the neural influence on heart rate in the third instar larvae...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612235/bio-logging-new-technologies-to-study-conservation-physiology-on-the-move-a-case-study-on-annual-survival-of-himalayan-vultures
#13
Sherub Sherub, Wolfgang Fiedler, Olivier Duriez, Martin Wikelski
Bio-logging, the on-animal deployment of miniaturised electronic data recorders, allows for the study of location, body position, and physiology of individuals throughout their ontogeny. For terrestrial animals, 1 Hz GPS-position, 3D-body acceleration, and ambient temperature provide standard data to link to the physiology of life histories. Environmental context is added at ever finer scales using remote sensing earth observation data. Here we showcase the use of such bio-logging approaches in a conservation physiology study on endangered Himalayan vultures (Gyps himalayensis)...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612234/radical-pair-based-magnetoreception-in-birds-radio-frequency-experiments-and-the-role-of-cryptochrome
#14
Christine Nießner, Michael Winklhofer
The radical-pair hypothesis of magnetoreception has gained a lot of momentum, since the flavoprotein cryptochrome was postulated as a structural candidate to host magnetically sensitive chemical reactions. Here, we first discuss behavioral tests using radio-frequency magnetic fields (0.1-10 MHz) to specifically disturb a radical-pair-based avian magnetic compass sense. While disorienting effects of broadband RF magnetic fields have been replicated independently in two competing labs, the effects of monochromatic RF magnetic fields administered at the electronic Larmor frequency (~1...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600601/morphology-and-hydro-sensory-role-of-superficial-neuromasts-in-schooling-behaviour-of-yellow-eyed-mullet-aldrichetta-forsteri
#15
Karen L Middlemiss, Denham G Cook, Alistair R Jerrett, William Davison
The lateral line system is a mechanosensory organ found in all fish species and located on the skin or in subdermal canals. The basic functional units are superficial and canal neuromasts, which are involved in hydrodynamic sensing and cohesion in schooling fish. Yellow-eyed mullet (Aldrichetta forsteri) are an obligate schooling species found commonly in shallow coastal areas of New Zealand and Australia. Schooling is a fundamental part of their behavioural repertoire, yet little is known about the structure or functionality of the lateral line in this species...
June 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600600/the-nervous-and-visual-systems-of-onychophorans-and-tardigrades-learning-about-arthropod-evolution-from-their-closest-relatives
#16
REVIEW
Christine Martin, Vladimir Gross, Lars Hering, Benjamin Tepper, Henry Jahn, Ivo de Sena Oliveira, Paul Anthony Stevenson, Georg Mayer
Understanding the origin and evolution of arthropods requires examining their closest outgroups, the tardigrades (water bears) and onychophorans (velvet worms). Despite the rise of molecular techniques, the phylogenetic positions of tardigrades and onychophorans in the panarthropod tree (onychophorans + tardigrades + arthropods) remain unresolved. Hence, these methods alone are currently insufficient for clarifying the panarthropod topology. Therefore, the evolution of different morphological traits, such as one of the most intriguing features of panarthropods-their nervous system-becomes essential for shedding light on the origin and evolution of arthropods and their relatives within the Panarthropoda...
June 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597315/fiber-type-distribution-in-insect-leg-muscles-parallels-similarities-and-differences-in-the-functional-role-of-insect-walking-legs
#17
Elzbieta Godlewska-Hammel, Ansgar Büschges, Matthias Gruhn
Previous studies have demonstrated that myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) enzyme activity in muscle fibers determines their contraction properties. We analyzed mATPase activities in muscles of the front, middle and hind legs of the orthopteran stick insect (Carausius morosus) to test the hypothesis that differences in muscle fiber types and distributions reflected differences in their behavioral functions. Our data show that all muscles are composed of at least three fiber types, fast, intermediate and slow, and demonstrate that: (1) in the femoral muscles (extensor and flexor tibiae) of all legs, the number of fast fibers decreases from proximal to distal, with a concomitant increase in the number of slow fibers...
June 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28585043/candidate-genes-for-migration-do-not-distinguish-migratory-and-non-migratory-birds
#18
Juan S Lugo Ramos, Kira E Delmore, Miriam Liedvogel
Migratory traits in birds have been shown to have a strong heritable component and several candidate genes have been suggested to control these migratory traits. To investigate if the genetic makeup of one or a set of these candidate genes can be used to identify a general pattern between migratory and non-migratory birds, we extracted genomic sequence data for 25 hypothesised candidate genes for migration from 70 available genomes across all orders of Aves and characterised sequence divergence between migratory and non-migratory phenotypes...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28573349/motion-based-signaling-in-sympatric-species-of-australian-agamid-lizards
#19
Jose A Ramos, Richard A Peters
Signaling species occurring in sympatry are often exposed to similar environmental constraints, so similar adaptations to enhance signal efficacy are expected. However, potentially opposing selective pressures might be present to ensure species recognition. Here, we analyzed the movement-based signals of two pairs of sympatric lizard species to consider how reliable communication is maintained while avoiding misidentification. Our novel approach allows us to quantify signal contrast with plant motion noise at any site we measure, including those utilized by other species...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28551870/linking-neuroethology-to-the-chemical-biology-of-natural-products-interactions-between-cone-snails-and-their-fish-prey-a-case-study
#20
REVIEW
Baldomero M Olivera, Shrinivasan Raghuraman, Eric W Schmidt, Helena Safavi-Hemami
From a biological perspective, a natural product can be defined as a compound evolved by an organism for chemical interactions with another organism including prey, predator, competitor, pathogen, symbiont or host. Natural products hold tremendous potential as drug leads and have been extensively studied by chemists and biochemists in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the biological purpose for which a natural product evolved is rarely addressed. By focusing on a well-studied group of natural products-venom components from predatory marine cone snails-this review provides a rationale for why a better understanding of the evolution, biology and biochemistry of natural products will facilitate both neuroscience and the potential for drug leads...
May 27, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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