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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918475/octopaminergic-innervation-and-a-neurohaemal-release-site-in-the-antennal-heart-of-the-locust-schistocerca-gregaria
#1
Victoria Antemann, Günther Pass, Hans-Joachim Pflüger
A detailed account is given by the octopaminergic innervation of the antennal heart in Schistocerca gregaria using various immunohistochemical methods. Anterograde axonal filling illustrates the unilateral innervation on the medial ventral surface of the pumping muscle of the antennal heart via the paired corpora cardiaca nerve III. In addition, antibody staining revealed that ascending axons of this nerve terminate at the ampullae of the antennal heart forming synaptoid structures and extensive neurohaemal release sites...
September 16, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916947/honey-bees-possess-a-polarity-sensitive-magnetoreceptor
#2
Veronika Lambinet, Michael E Hayden, Chloe Reid, Gerhard Gries
Honey bees, Apis mellifera, exploit the geomagnetic field for orientation during foraging and for alignment of their combs within hives. We tested the hypothesis that honey bees sense the polarity of magnetic fields. We created an engineered magnetic anomaly in which the magnetic field generally either converged toward a sugar reward in a watch glass, or away from it. After bees in behavioral field studies had learned to associate this anomaly with a sugar water reward, we subjected them to two experiments performed in random order...
September 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28905251/comparing-the-face-inversion-effect-in-crows-and-humans
#3
Katharina F Brecht, Lysann Wagener, Ljerka Ostojić, Nicola S Clayton, Andreas Nieder
Humans show impaired recognition of faces that are presented upside down, a phenomenon termed face inversion effect, which is thought to reflect the special relevance of faces for humans. Here, we investigated whether a phylogenetically distantly related avian species, the carrion crow, with similar socio-cognitive abilities to human and non-human primates, exhibits a face inversion effect. In a delayed matching-to-sample task, two crows had to differentiate profiles of crow faces as well as matched controls, presented both upright and inverted...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28884199/behavioral-responses-to-visual-overstimulation-in-the-cockroach-periplaneta-americana-l
#4
Marianna Zhukovskaya, Ekaterina Novikova, Paulus Saari, Roman V Frolov
In the visual systems of insects, different types of photoreceptors contribute to specialized visual channels that mediate distinct functions and behaviors. Large compound eyes of Periplaneta americana contain photoreceptors of two spectral classes, broadband green-sensitive photoreceptors and narrow-band UV-sensitive photoreceptors. Here, we investigated how visual stimulation by UV and green light affects locomotor, resting, and grooming behaviors in P. americana under conditions when light avoidance is not possible...
September 7, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28879513/high-contrast-sensitivity-for-visually-guided-flight-control-in-bumblebees
#5
Aravin Chakravarthi, Almut Kelber, Emily Baird, Marie Dacke
Many insects rely on vision to find food, to return to their nest and to carefully control their flight between these two locations. The amount of information available to support these tasks is, in part, dictated by the spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity of their visual systems. Here, we investigate the absolute limits of these visual properties for visually guided position and speed control in Bombus terrestris. Our results indicate that the limit of spatial vision in the translational motion detection system of B...
September 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28866838/the-path-to-colour-discrimination-is-s-shaped-behaviour-determines-the-interpretation-of-colour-models
#6
Jair E Garcia, Johannes Spaethe, Adrian G Dyer
Most of our current understanding on colour discrimination by animal observers is built on models. These typically set strict limits on the capacity of an animal to discriminate between colour stimuli imposed by physiological characteristics of the visual system and different assumptions about the underlying mechanisms of colour processing by the brain. Such physiologically driven models were not designed to accommodate sigmoidal-type discrimination functions as those observed in recent behavioural experiments...
September 2, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28852845/short-term-peripheral-sensitization-by-brief-exposure-to-pheromone-components-in-spodoptera-littoralis
#7
S López, A Guerrero, M J Bleda, C Quero
In insects, the olfactory system displays a high degree of plasticity. In Spodoptera littoralis, pre-exposure of males to the sex pheromone has been shown to increase the sensitivity of the olfactory sensory neurons at peripheral level. In this study, we have investigated this sensitization effect by recording the electroantennographic responses of male antennae to the major sex pheromone component (Z,E)-9,11-tetradecadienyl acetate and to the minor components (Z,E)-9,12-tetradecadienyl acetate and (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate...
August 29, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28852844/take-time-odor-coding-capacity-across-sensory-neurons-increases-over-time-in-drosophila
#8
Daniel Münch, C Giovanni Galizia
Due to the highly efficient olfactory code, olfactory sensory systems are able to reliably encode enormous numbers of olfactory stimuli. The olfactory code consists of combinatorial activation patterns across sensory neurons, thus its capacity exceeds the number of involved classes of sensory neurons by a manifold. Activation patterns are not static but vary over time, caused by the temporally complex response dynamics of the individual sensory neuron responses. We systematically analyzed the temporal dynamics of olfactory sensory neuron responses to a diverse set of odorants...
August 29, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28836038/the-effects-of-stimulus-parameters-on-auditory-evoked-potentials-of-carassius-auratus
#9
Jessica R Garabon, Dennis M Higgs
Whole-brain responses to sound are easily measured through auditory evoked potentials (AEP), but it is unclear how differences in experimental parameters affect these responses. The effect of varying parameters is especially unclear in fish studies, the majority of which use simple sound types and then extrapolate to natural conditions. The current study investigated AEPs in goldfish (Carassius auratus) using sounds of different durations (5, 10, and 20 ms) and frequencies (200, 500, 600 and 700 Hz) to test stimulus effects on latency and thresholds...
August 23, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28831545/how-the-humble-insect-brain-became-a-powerful-experimental-model-system
#10
REVIEW
Heinrich Reichert
In the 21st century, neurobiological studies focused on the insect brain are revealing unprecedented insight into the molecular, cellular, developmental, and circuit aspects of brain organization and function, notably in the genetic model system of Drosophila melanogaster. Underlying this accelerating progress in understanding the insect brain is a century-long history of ground breaking experimental investigation, methodological advance, and conceptual insight catalyzed by the integration of two emerging research fields, neuroscience and genetics...
August 22, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819686/the-sensory-substrate-of-multimodal-communication-in-brown-headed-cowbirds-are-females-sensory-specialists-or-generalists
#11
Kelly L Ronald, Timothy M Sesterhenn, Esteban Fernandez-Juricic, Jeffrey R Lucas
Many animals communicate with multimodal signals. While we have an understanding of multimodal signal production, we know relatively less about receiver filtering of multimodal signals and whether filtering capacity in one modality influences filtering in a second modality. Most multimodal signals contain a temporal element, such as change in frequency over time or a dynamic visual display. We examined the relationship in temporal resolution across two modalities to test whether females are (1) sensory 'specialists', where a trade-off exists between the sensory modalities, (2) sensory 'generalists', where a positive relationship exists between the modalities, or (3) whether no relationship exists between modalities...
August 17, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28808778/audiogram-of-the-mallard-duck-anas-platyrhynchos-from-16%C3%A2-hz-to-9%C3%A2-khz
#12
Evan M Hill
The pure-tone thresholds of three mallard ducks were determined from 16 Hz to 9 kHz. The purpose was to determine whether the mallard duck hears infrasound, which then may potentially be used for navigation, similar to how it is proposed that pigeons use it for homing. At a level of 60 dB sound pressure level (re 20 μN/m(2)), their hearing range extends 6.85 octaves from 66 Hz to 7.6 kHz, with a best sensitivity of 12.5 dB at 2 kHz. However, at no frequency, including the lowest tested, were the ducks' thresholds lower than those of humans...
August 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28752253/homing-in-a-tropical-social-wasp-role-of-spatial-familiarity-motivation-and-age
#13
Souvik Mandal, Anindita Brahma, Raghavendra Gadagkar
We captured foragers of the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata from their nests and displaced them at different distances and directions. Wasps displaced within their probable foraging grounds returned to their nests on the day of release although they oriented randomly upon release; however, wasps fed before release returned sooner, displaying nest-ward orientation. When displaced to places far from their nests, thus expected to be unfamiliar, only a third returned on the day of release showing nest-ward orientation; others oriented randomly and either returned on subsequent days or never...
July 27, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28748486/nonlinear-processing-of-a-multicomponent-communication-signal-by-combination-sensitive-neurons-in-the-anuran-inferior-colliculus
#14
Norman Lee, Katrina M Schrode, Mark A Bee
Diverse animals communicate using multicomponent signals. How a receiver's central nervous system integrates multiple signal components remains largely unknown. We investigated how female green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) integrate the multiple spectral components present in male advertisement calls. Typical calls have a bimodal spectrum consisting of formant-like low-frequency (~0.9 kHz) and high-frequency (~2.7 kHz) components that are transduced by different sensory organs in the inner ear. In behavioral experiments, only bimodal calls reliably elicited phonotaxis in no-choice tests, and they were selectively chosen over unimodal calls in two-alternative choice tests...
July 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28741079/characterization-of-the-first-order-visual-interneurons-in-the-visual-system-of-the-bumblebee-bombus-terrestris
#15
Juha Rusanen, Antti Vähäkainu, Matti Weckström, Kentaro Arikawa
The bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) has become a common model animal in the study of various aspects of vision and visually guided behavior. Although the bumblebee visual system has been studied to some extent, little is known about the functional role of the first visual neuropil, the lamina. In this work, we provide an anatomical and electrophysiological description of the first-order visual interneurons, lamina monopolar cells (LMCs), of the bumblebee. Using intracellular recording coupled with dye injection, we found that bumblebee LMCs morphologically resemble those found in the honeybee, although only the LMC type L1 cells could be morphologically matched directly between the species...
July 24, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733816/relative-weighting-of-acoustic-information-during-mating-decisions-in-grasshoppers-indicates-signatures-of-sexual-selection
#16
Jan Clemens, Jennifer Aufderheide, Bernhard Ronacher
The decision with whom to mate is crucial in determining an individual's fitness and is often based on the evaluation of visual or acoustic displays produced during courtship. Accordingly, the algorithms for evaluating such courtship signals are shaped by sexual selection and should reflect the expected benefits and costs of mating: signals bearing heterospecific features should be rapidly rejected, since mating would produce no fertile offspring, while signals resembling conspecific ones should be weighted proportional to mate quality...
July 21, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28721519/variations-of-cocoon-external-lipids-during-wolf-spiderlings-development
#17
F Ruhland, S Schulz, Marie Trabalon
This study presents the first characterisation of the silk lipids of the cocoons of a wolf spider (Pardosa saltans). Wolf spiders' maternal behaviour is complex and involves guarding a cocoon for several weeks, and so cocoons must emit cues to ensure their care and the development of juveniles. We investigated cues associated with the cocoon silk. We assessed qualitative changes of the lipid contents and the composition of cocoon silk in relation to the development of P. saltans wolf spider juveniles. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of P...
July 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28702846/characterization-of-the-encoding-properties-of-intraspinal-mechanosensory-neurons-in-the-lamprey
#18
Nicole Massarelli, Allan L Yau, Kathleen A Hoffman, Tim Kiemel, Eric D Tytell
Proprioceptive sensory inputs are an integral part of the closed-loop system of locomotion. In the lamprey, a model organism for vertebrate locomotion, such sensory inputs come from intraspinal mechanosensory cells called "edge cells". These edge cells synapse directly onto interneurons in the spinal central pattern generator (CPG) circuit and allow the CPG to adjust the motor output according to how the body is bending. However, the encoding properties of the edge cells have never been fully characterized...
July 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689296/development-of-auditory-sensitivity-in-the-barn-owl
#19
Anna Kraemer, Caitlin Baxter, Alayna Hendrix, Catherine E Carr
Adult barn owl hearing is acute, but development of this sense is not well understood. We, therefore, measured auditory brainstem responses in barn owls from before the onset of hearing (posthatch day 2, or P2) to adulthood (P69). The first consistent responses were detected at P4 for 1 and 2 kHz, followed by responses to 0.5 and 4 kHz at P9, and 5 kHz at P13. Sensitivity to higher frequencies increased with age, with responses to 12 kHz appearing about 2 months after hatching, once the facial ruff was mature...
July 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28685186/the-protein-pheromone-temptin-is-an-attractant-of-the-gastropod-biomphalaria-glabrata
#20
Emmanuel A Pila, Shauna J Peck, Patrick C Hanington
The freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata has drawn much research interest by virtue of it being one of the intermediate hosts of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of human schistosomiasis. Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease that affects over 260 million people globally, particularly in tropical and sub-tropical regions. One strategy that has been proposed as a way to prevent human infection by the parasite, involves the use of pheromone traps to lure the snail host away from areas of human activity...
July 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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