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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616653/bird-migration
#1
EDITORIAL
Franz Bairlein, Wolfgang Wiltschko
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612236/using-optogenetics-to-assess-neuroendocrine-modulation-of-heart-rate-in-drosophila-melanogaster-larvae
#2
Cole Malloy, Jacob Sifers, Angela Mikos, Aya Samadi, Aya Omar, Christina Hermanns, Robin L Cooper
The Drosophila melanogaster heart has become a principal model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. While the morphology of the heart in Drosophila and mammals is different, many of the molecular mechanisms that underlie heart development and function are similar and function can be assessed by similar physiological measurements, such as cardiac output, rate, and time in systole or diastole. Here, we have utilized an intact, optogenetic approach to assess the neural influence on heart rate in the third instar larvae...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612235/bio-logging-new-technologies-to-study-conservation-physiology-on-the-move-a-case-study-on-annual-survival-of-himalayan-vultures
#3
Sherub Sherub, Wolfgang Fiedler, Olivier Duriez, Martin Wikelski
Bio-logging, the on-animal deployment of miniaturised electronic data recorders, allows for the study of location, body position, and physiology of individuals throughout their ontogeny. For terrestrial animals, 1 Hz GPS-position, 3D-body acceleration, and ambient temperature provide standard data to link to the physiology of life histories. Environmental context is added at ever finer scales using remote sensing earth observation data. Here we showcase the use of such bio-logging approaches in a conservation physiology study on endangered Himalayan vultures (Gyps himalayensis)...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612234/radical-pair-based-magnetoreception-in-birds-radio-frequency-experiments-and-the-role-of-cryptochrome
#4
Christine Nießner, Michael Winklhofer
The radical-pair hypothesis of magnetoreception has gained a lot of momentum, since the flavoprotein cryptochrome was postulated as a structural candidate to host magnetically sensitive chemical reactions. Here, we first discuss behavioral tests using radio-frequency magnetic fields (0.1-10 MHz) to specifically disturb a radical-pair-based avian magnetic compass sense. While disorienting effects of broadband RF magnetic fields have been replicated independently in two competing labs, the effects of monochromatic RF magnetic fields administered at the electronic Larmor frequency (~1...
June 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28608154/neural-control-of-daily-and-seasonal-timing-of-songbird-migration
#5
Tyler J Stevenson, Vinod Kumar
Bird migration is one of most salient annual events in nature. It involves predictable seasonal movements between breeding and non-breeding habitats. Both circadian and circannual clocks are entrained by photoperiodic cues and time daily and seasonal changes in migratory physiology and behavior. This mini-review provides an update on daily and seasonal rhythms of migratory behavior, and examines the neuroendocrine and molecular pathways involved in the timing of migration in songbirds. Recent findings have identified key neural substrates, and suggest the involvement of multiple neuroendocrine regulatory systems in controlling seasonal states in migrants...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600601/morphology-and-hydro-sensory-role-of-superficial-neuromasts-in-schooling-behaviour-of-yellow-eyed-mullet-aldrichetta-forsteri
#6
Karen L Middlemiss, Denham G Cook, Alistair R Jerrett, William Davison
The lateral line system is a mechanosensory organ found in all fish species and located on the skin or in subdermal canals. The basic functional units are superficial and canal neuromasts, which are involved in hydrodynamic sensing and cohesion in schooling fish. Yellow-eyed mullet (Aldrichetta forsteri) are an obligate schooling species found commonly in shallow coastal areas of New Zealand and Australia. Schooling is a fundamental part of their behavioural repertoire, yet little is known about the structure or functionality of the lateral line in this species...
June 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600600/the-nervous-and-visual-systems-of-onychophorans-and-tardigrades-learning-about-arthropod-evolution-from-their-closest-relatives
#7
REVIEW
Christine Martin, Vladimir Gross, Lars Hering, Benjamin Tepper, Henry Jahn, Ivo de Sena Oliveira, Paul Anthony Stevenson, Georg Mayer
Understanding the origin and evolution of arthropods requires examining their closest outgroups, the tardigrades (water bears) and onychophorans (velvet worms). Despite the rise of molecular techniques, the phylogenetic positions of tardigrades and onychophorans in the panarthropod tree (onychophorans + tardigrades + arthropods) remain unresolved. Hence, these methods alone are currently insufficient for clarifying the panarthropod topology. Therefore, the evolution of different morphological traits, such as one of the most intriguing features of panarthropods-their nervous system-becomes essential for shedding light on the origin and evolution of arthropods and their relatives within the Panarthropoda...
June 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597315/fiber-type-distribution-in-insect-leg-muscles-parallels-similarities-and-differences-in-the-functional-role-of-insect-walking-legs
#8
Elzbieta Godlewska-Hammel, Ansgar Büschges, Matthias Gruhn
Previous studies have demonstrated that myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) enzyme activity in muscle fibers determines their contraction properties. We analyzed mATPase activities in muscles of the front, middle and hind legs of the orthopteran stick insect (Carausius morosus) to test the hypothesis that differences in muscle fiber types and distributions reflected differences in their behavioral functions. Our data show that all muscles are composed of at least three fiber types, fast, intermediate and slow, and demonstrate that: (1) in the femoral muscles (extensor and flexor tibiae) of all legs, the number of fast fibers decreases from proximal to distal, with a concomitant increase in the number of slow fibers...
June 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28585043/candidate-genes-for-migration-do-not-distinguish-migratory-and-non-migratory-birds
#9
Juan S Lugo Ramos, Kira E Delmore, Miriam Liedvogel
Migratory traits in birds have been shown to have a strong heritable component and several candidate genes have been suggested to control these migratory traits. To investigate if the genetic makeup of one or a set of these candidate genes can be used to identify a general pattern between migratory and non-migratory birds, we extracted genomic sequence data for 25 hypothesised candidate genes for migration from 70 available genomes across all orders of Aves and characterised sequence divergence between migratory and non-migratory phenotypes...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28573349/motion-based-signaling-in-sympatric-species-of-australian-agamid-lizards
#10
Jose A Ramos, Richard A Peters
Signaling species occurring in sympatry are often exposed to similar environmental constraints, so similar adaptations to enhance signal efficacy are expected. However, potentially opposing selective pressures might be present to ensure species recognition. Here, we analyzed the movement-based signals of two pairs of sympatric lizard species to consider how reliable communication is maintained while avoiding misidentification. Our novel approach allows us to quantify signal contrast with plant motion noise at any site we measure, including those utilized by other species...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28551870/linking-neuroethology-to-the-chemical-biology-of-natural-products-interactions-between-cone-snails-and-their-fish-prey-a-case-study
#11
REVIEW
Baldomero M Olivera, Shrinivasan Raghuraman, Eric W Schmidt, Helena Safavi-Hemami
From a biological perspective, a natural product can be defined as a compound evolved by an organism for chemical interactions with another organism including prey, predator, competitor, pathogen, symbiont or host. Natural products hold tremendous potential as drug leads and have been extensively studied by chemists and biochemists in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the biological purpose for which a natural product evolved is rarely addressed. By focusing on a well-studied group of natural products-venom components from predatory marine cone snails-this review provides a rationale for why a better understanding of the evolution, biology and biochemistry of natural products will facilitate both neuroscience and the potential for drug leads...
May 27, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508130/atmospheric-conditions-create-freeways-detours-and-tailbacks-for-migrating-birds
#12
Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Felix Liechti, Wouter M G Vansteelant
The extraordinary adaptations of birds to contend with atmospheric conditions during their migratory flights have captivated ecologists for decades. During the 21st century technological advances have sparked a revival of research into the influence of weather on migrating birds. Using biologging technology, flight behaviour is measured across entire flyways, weather radar networks quantify large-scale migratory fluxes, citizen scientists gather observations of migrant birds and mechanistic models are used to simulate migration in dynamic aerial environments...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500442/drosophila-rhodopsin-7-can-partially-replace-the-structural-role-of-rhodopsin-1-but-not-its-physiological-function
#13
Rudi Grebler, Christa Kistenpfennig, Dirk Rieger, Joachim Bentrop, Stephan Schneuwly, Pingkalai R Senthilan, Charlotte Helfrich-Förster
Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7), a new invertebrate Rhodopsin gene, was discovered in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster in 2000 and thought to encode for a functional Rhodopsin protein. Indeed, Rh7 exhibits most hallmarks of the known Rhodopsins, except for the G-protein-activating QAKK motif in the third cytoplasmic loop that is absent in Rh7. Here, we show that Rh7 can partially substitute Rh1 in the outer receptor cells (R1-6) for rhabdomere maintenance, but that it cannot activate the phototransduction cascade in these cells...
May 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28500441/route-simulations-compass-mechanisms-and-long-distance-migration-flights-in-birds
#14
REVIEW
Susanne Åkesson, Giuseppe Bianco
Bird migration has fascinated humans for centuries and routes crossing the globe are now starting to be revealed by advanced tracking technology. A central question is what compass mechanism, celestial or geomagnetic, is activated during these long flights. Different approaches based on the geometry of flight routes across the globe and route simulations based on predictions from compass mechanisms with or without including the effect of winds have been used to try to answer this question with varying results...
May 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497254/9-phenanthrol-modulates-postinhibitory-rebound-and-afterhyperpolarizing-potentials-in-an-excitatory-motor-neuron-of-the-medicinal-leech
#15
James D Angstadt, Joshua R Giordano, Alexander J Goncalves
Postinhibitory rebound (PIR) responses in leech dorsal excitatory motor neurons (cell DE-3) are eliminated by Ca(2+) channel blockers but also exhibit a strong dependence on extracellular Na(+). These features could be explained by a voltage-gated Ca(2+) current acting in concert with a Ca(2+)-activated nonspecific current (ICAN). In vertebrates, ICAN is associated with TRPM4 channels which are blocked selectively by 9-phenanthrol. Here, we show that 9-phenanthrol selectively inhibits a late phase of PIR and simultaneously enhances afterhyperpolarizing potentials (AHPs)...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497253/effects-of-juvenile-hormone-analogue-methoprene-and-20-hydroxyecdysone-on-reproduction-in-polygonia-c-aureum-lepidoptera-nymphalidae-in-relation-to-adult-diapause
#16
Satoshi Hiroyoshi, Gadi V P Reddy, Jun Mitsuhashi
We investigated the effects of juvenile hormone analogue (methoprene) and 20-hydroxyecdysone on female and male reproduction in a nymphalid butterfly, Polygonia c-aureum. This butterfly has a facultative adult diapause controlled by the corpora allata and brain. Methoprene seems to terminate reproductive diapause, although transplantation experiments indicate that the activity of the corpora allata does not affect male mating behavior Endo (Dev Growth Differ 15:1-10, 1973a), suggesting that the brain may be involved in diapause...
May 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28488067/attachment-ability-of-the-southern-green-stink-bug-nezara-viridula-heteroptera-pentatomidae
#17
Gianandrea Salerno, Manuela Rebora, Elena Gorb, Alexander Kovalev, Stanislav Gorb
The present paper characterizes the attachment ability of males and females of Nezara viridula (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) on artificial surfaces (smooth hydrophilic, smooth hydrophobic, different surface roughness) and on both leaf surfaces of the typical host plant species Vicia faba, using a centrifugal force tester and a traction force experiments set up. N. viridula is a serious crop pest in the world and shows attachment devices different from the so far investigated Heteroptera, with a tarsus characterized by distal smooth flexible pulvilli combined with claws and proximal ventral hairy pad...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478535/why-background-colour-matters-to-bees-and-flowers
#18
Zoë Bukovac, Mani Shrestha, Jair E Garcia, Martin Burd, Alan Dorin, Adrian G Dyer
Flowers are often viewed by bee pollinators against a variety of different backgrounds. On the Australian continent, backgrounds are very diverse and include surface examples of all major geological stages of the Earth's history, which have been present during the entire evolutionary period of Angiosperms. Flower signals in Australia are also representative of typical worldwide evolutionary spectral adaptations that enable successful pollination. We measured the spectral properties of 581 natural surfaces, including rocks, sand, green leaves, and dry plant materials, sampled from tropical Cairns through to the southern tip of mainland Australia...
May 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447200/skyline-retention-and-retroactive-interference-in-the-navigating-australian-desert-ant-melophorus-bagoti
#19
Cody A Freas, Christopher Whyte, Ken Cheng
Visual cues commonly aid solitary foraging ants. Specifically, foragers can use the skyline where terrestrial landmarks meet the sky. Foraging ants show a remarkable affinity to retain these terrestrial cues, developing lifelong memories of the nest site panorama. Here we explore foragers' ability to retain skyline cues of resource locations at some distance from the nest through experiments with artificial skylines erected around a resource location. We also tested the foragers' memories of one skyline at several time points after the skyline was replaced by a different one...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421281/hearing-diversity-in-moths-confronting-a-neotropical-bat-assemblage
#20
Ariadna Cobo-Cuan, Manfred Kössl, Emanuel C Mora
The tympanal ear is an evolutionary acquisition which helps moths survive predation from bats. The greater diversity of bats and echolocation strategies in the Neotropics compared with temperate zones would be expected to impose different sensory requirements on the neotropical moths. However, even given some variability among moth assemblages, the frequencies of best hearing of moths from different climate zones studied to date have been roughly the same: between 20 and 60 kHz. We have analyzed the auditory characteristics of tympanate moths from Cuba, a neotropical island with high levels of bat diversity and a high incidence of echolocation frequencies above those commonly at the upper limit of moths' hearing sensitivity...
April 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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