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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29143128/the-evolution-of-androgen-receptor-expression-and-behavior-in-anolis-lizard-forelimb-muscles
#1
Michele A Johnson, Bonnie K Kircher, Diego J Castro
The motor systems that produce behavioral movements are among the primary targets for the action of steroid hormones, including androgens. Androgens such as testosterone bind to androgen receptors (AR) to induce physiological changes in the size, strength, and energetic capacity of skeletal muscles, which can directly influence the performance of behaviors in which those muscles are used. Because tissues differentially express AR, resulting in tissue-specific sensitivity to androgens, AR expression may be a major target of selection for the evolution of behavior...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119247/wall-following-in-xenopus-laevis-is-barrier-driven
#2
Sara Hänzi, Hans Straka
The tendency of animals to follow boundaries within their environment can serve as a strategy for spatial learning or defensive behaviour. We examined whether Xenopus laevis tadpoles and froglets employ such a strategy by characterizing their swimming pattern in a square tank with shallow water. Trajectories obtained from video recordings were analysed for proximity to the nearest wall. With the exception of young larvae, the vast majority of animals (both tadpoles and froglets) spent a disproportionately large amount of time near the wall...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29101455/hormonal-control-of-behavior-novel-mechanisms-and-model-organisms
#3
EDITORIAL
Barney A Schlinger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 3, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29094198/the-turtle-visual-system-mediates-a-complex-spatiotemporal-transformation-of-visual-stimuli-into-cortical-activity
#4
Mahmood S Hoseini, Jeff Pobst, Nathaniel C Wright, Wesley Clawson, Woodrow Shew, Ralf Wessel
The three-layered visual cortex of turtle is characterized by extensive intracortical axonal projections and receives non-retinotopic axonal projections from lateral geniculate nucleus. What spatiotemporal transformation of visual stimuli into cortical activity arises from such tangle of malleable cortical inputs and intracortical connections? To address this question, we obtained band-pass filtered extracellular recordings of neural activity in turtle dorsal cortex during visual stimulation of the retina. We discovered important spatial and temporal features of stimulus-modulated cortical local field potential (LFP) recordings...
November 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29086012/on-the-role-of-brain-aromatase-in-females-why-are-estrogens-produced-locally-when-they-are-available-systemically
#5
REVIEW
Charlotte A Cornil
The ovaries are often thought of as the main and only source of estrogens involved in the regulation of female behavior. However, aromatase, the key enzyme for estrogen synthesis, although it is more abundant in males, is expressed and active in the brain of females where it is regulated by similar mechanisms as in males. Early work had shown that estrogens produced in the ventromedial hypothalamus are involved in the regulation of female sexual behavior in musk shrews. However, the question of the role of central aromatase in general had not received much attention until recently...
October 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29086011/remembering-franz-huber-november-20-1925-april-27-2017-a-pioneer-of-insect-neuroethology
#6
EDITORIAL
Friedrich G Barth
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29080952/acute-effects-of-sex-steroids-on-visual-processing-in-male-goldfish
#7
S Yue, V Wadia, N Sekula, P S Dickinson, R R Thompson
Elevations of sex steroids induced by social cues can rapidly modulate social behavior, but we know little about where they act within the nervous system to produce such effects. In male goldfish, testosterone (T) rapidly increases approach responses to the visual cues of females through its conversion to estradiol. Because aromatase is expressed in the retina, we tested if T can acutely influence retina responses to visual stimuli, and investigated the receptor mechanisms that may mediate such effects. Specifically, we measured FOS protein immunoreactivity to determine if T affects cellular responses to visual stimuli that include females, and used electrophysiology to investigate whether T can generally affect light sensitivity...
October 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29075852/responses-of-medullary-lateral-line-units-of-the-rudd-scardinius-erythrophthalmus-and-the-nase-chondrostoma-nasus-to-vortex-streets
#8
Jan Winkelnkemper, Simon Kranz, Horst Bleckmann
Fish use their mechanosensory lateral line amongst others for the detection of vortices shed by an upstream object and/or for the detection of vortices caused by the tail fin movements of another fish. Thus, vortices are one type of hydrodynamic stimuli to which fish are exposed in their natural environment. We investigated the responses of medullary lateral line units of common rudd, Scardinius erythrophthalmus, and common nase, Chondrostoma nasus (Cyprinidae), to water flow (9.5-13.3 cm(-1)) that contained vortices (a Kármán vortex street) shed by an upstream cylinder (diameter 2 cm)...
October 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063285/songbird-chemical-signals-reflect-uropygial-gland-androgen-sensitivity-and-predict-aggression-implications-for-the-role-of-the-periphery-in-chemosignaling
#9
Danielle J Whittaker, Kimberly A Rosvall, Samuel P Slowinski, Helena A Soini, Milos V Novotny, Ellen D Ketterson
Chemical signals can provide useful information to potential mates and rivals. The production mechanisms of these signals are poorly understood in birds, despite emerging evidence that volatile compounds from preen oil may serve as chemosignals. Steroid hormones, including testosterone (T), may influence the production of these signals, yet variation in circulating T only partly accounts for this variation. We hypothesized that odor is a T-mediated signal of an individual's phenotype, regulated in part by androgen sensitivity in the uropygial gland...
October 23, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063284/androgen-receptors-and-muscle-a-key-mechanism-underlying-life-history-trade-offs
#10
REVIEW
D Ashley Monks, Melissa M Holmes
Sexual dimorphism in skeletal muscle is prominent in mammals, with males typically having larger and stronger muscles than females. Furthermore, neuromuscular systems with sexual functions are remarkably sexually dimorphic in a wide variety of vertebrates. Endocrine mechanisms are of central importance for sexual differentiation of these traits, and anabolic actions of gonadal testosterone have been intensively studied. Here we review the relationship between androgen receptor (AR) and sexual differentiation of neuromuscular systems...
October 23, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058069/genes-linked-to-species-diversity-in-a-sexually-dimorphic-communication-signal-in-electric-fish
#11
G Troy Smith, Melissa R Proffitt, Adam R Smith, Douglas B Rusch
Sexually dimorphic behaviors are often regulated by androgens and estrogens. Steroid receptors and metabolism are control points for evolutionary changes in sexual dimorphism. Electric communication signals of South American knifefishes are a model for understanding the evolution and physiology of sexually dimorphic behavior. These signals are regulated by gonadal steroids and controlled by a simple neural circuit. Sexual dimorphism of the signals varies across species. We used transcriptomics to examine mechanisms for sex differences in electric organ discharges (EODs) of two closely related species, Apteronotus leptorhynchus and Apteronotus albifrons, with reversed sexual dimorphism in their EODs...
October 20, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29026980/evolution-of-the-androgen-induced-male-phenotype
#12
REVIEW
Matthew J Fuxjager, Meredith C Miles, Barney A Schlinger
The masculine reproductive phenotype varies significantly across vertebrates. As a result, biologists have long recognized that many of the mechanisms that support these phenotypes-particularly the androgenic system-is evolutionarily labile, and thus susceptible to the effects of selection for different traits. However, exactly how androgenic signaling systems vary in a way which results in dramatically different functional outputs, remain largely unclear. We explore this topic here by outlining four key-but non-mutually exclusive-hypotheses that propose how the mechanisms of androgenic signaling might change over time to potentiate the emergence of phenotypical variation in masculine behavior and physiology...
October 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28993864/frequency-sensitivity-in-northern-saw-whet-owls-aegolius-acadicus
#13
Julia R Beatini, Glenn A Proudfoot, Megan D Gall
Northern saw-whet owls (Aegolius acadicus) are known for their unique asymmetrical ear structure and ability to localize prey acoustically, yet few attempts have been made to explore the auditory capabilities of this species. In this study, we evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) with tonebursts to assess three main hypotheses regarding the evolution of auditory sensitivity: sender-receiver matching, ecological constraints, and phylogenetic/morphological constraints. We found that ABR amplitude increased with increasing stimulus level, which is consistent with results in other avian species...
October 9, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28988348/insight-into-the-neuroendocrine-basis-of-signal-evolution-a-case-study-in-foot-flagging-frogs
#14
REVIEW
Lisa A Mangiamele, Matthew J Fuxjager
A hallmark of sexual selection is the evolution of elaborate male sexual signals. Yet, how the physiology of an animal changes to support a new or modified signal is a question that has remained largely unanswered. Androgens are important in regulating male reproductive behavior, therefore, selection for particular signals may drive the evolution of increased androgenic sensitivity in the neuro-motor systems underlying their production. Studies of the neuroendocrine mechanisms of anuran sexual signaling provide evidence to support this idea...
October 7, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28918475/octopaminergic-innervation-and-a-neurohaemal-release-site-in-the-antennal-heart-of-the-locust-schistocerca-gregaria
#15
Victoria Antemann, Günther Pass, Hans-Joachim Pflüger
A detailed account is given by the octopaminergic innervation of the antennal heart in Schistocerca gregaria using various immunohistochemical methods. Anterograde axonal filling illustrates the unilateral innervation on the medial ventral surface of the pumping muscle of the antennal heart via the paired corpora cardiaca nerve III. In addition, antibody staining revealed that ascending axons of this nerve terminate at the ampullae of the antennal heart forming synaptoid structures and extensive neurohaemal release sites...
September 16, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916947/honey-bees-possess-a-polarity-sensitive-magnetoreceptor
#16
Veronika Lambinet, Michael E Hayden, Chloe Reid, Gerhard Gries
Honey bees, Apis mellifera, exploit the geomagnetic field for orientation during foraging and for alignment of their combs within hives. We tested the hypothesis that honey bees sense the polarity of magnetic fields. We created an engineered magnetic anomaly in which the magnetic field generally either converged toward a sugar reward in a watch glass, or away from it. After bees in behavioral field studies had learned to associate this anomaly with a sugar water reward, we subjected them to two experiments performed in random order...
September 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28905251/comparing-the-face-inversion-effect-in-crows-and-humans
#17
Katharina F Brecht, Lysann Wagener, Ljerka Ostojić, Nicola S Clayton, Andreas Nieder
Humans show impaired recognition of faces that are presented upside down, a phenomenon termed face inversion effect, which is thought to reflect the special relevance of faces for humans. Here, we investigated whether a phylogenetically distantly related avian species, the carrion crow, with similar socio-cognitive abilities to human and non-human primates, exhibits a face inversion effect. In a delayed matching-to-sample task, two crows had to differentiate profiles of crow faces as well as matched controls, presented both upright and inverted...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28884199/behavioral-responses-to-visual-overstimulation-in-the-cockroach-periplaneta-americana-l
#18
Marianna Zhukovskaya, Ekaterina Novikova, Paulus Saari, Roman V Frolov
In the visual systems of insects, different types of photoreceptors contribute to specialized visual channels that mediate distinct functions and behaviors. Large compound eyes of Periplaneta americana contain photoreceptors of two spectral classes, broadband green-sensitive photoreceptors and narrow-band UV-sensitive photoreceptors. Here, we investigated how visual stimulation by UV and green light affects locomotor, resting, and grooming behaviors in P. americana under conditions when light avoidance is not possible...
September 7, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28879513/high-contrast-sensitivity-for-visually-guided-flight-control-in-bumblebees
#19
Aravin Chakravarthi, Almut Kelber, Emily Baird, Marie Dacke
Many insects rely on vision to find food, to return to their nest and to carefully control their flight between these two locations. The amount of information available to support these tasks is, in part, dictated by the spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity of their visual systems. Here, we investigate the absolute limits of these visual properties for visually guided position and speed control in Bombus terrestris. Our results indicate that the limit of spatial vision in the translational motion detection system of B...
September 6, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28866838/the-path-to-colour-discrimination-is-s-shaped-behaviour-determines-the-interpretation-of-colour-models
#20
Jair E Garcia, Johannes Spaethe, Adrian G Dyer
Most of our current understanding on colour discrimination by animal observers is built on models. These typically set strict limits on the capacity of an animal to discriminate between colour stimuli imposed by physiological characteristics of the visual system and different assumptions about the underlying mechanisms of colour processing by the brain. Such physiologically driven models were not designed to accommodate sigmoidal-type discrimination functions as those observed in recent behavioural experiments...
September 2, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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