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Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447200/skyline-retention-and-retroactive-interference-in-the-navigating-australian-desert-ant-melophorus-bagoti
#1
Cody A Freas, Christopher Whyte, Ken Cheng
Visual cues commonly aid solitary foraging ants. Specifically, foragers can use the skyline where terrestrial landmarks meet the sky. Foraging ants show a remarkable affinity to retain these terrestrial cues, developing lifelong memories of the nest site panorama. Here we explore foragers' ability to retain skyline cues of resource locations at some distance from the nest through experiments with artificial skylines erected around a resource location. We also tested the foragers' memories of one skyline at several time points after the skyline was replaced by a different one...
April 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429124/how-bumblebees-use-lateral-and-ventral-optic-flow-cues-for-position-control-in-environments-of-different-proximity
#2
Nellie Linander, Emily Baird, Marie Dacke
Flying insects frequently navigate through environments of different complexity. In this study, buff-tailed bumblebees (Bombus terrestris L.) were trained to fly along tunnels of different widths, from 60 to 240 cm. In tunnel widths of 60 and 120 cm, bumblebees control their lateral position by balancing the magnitude of translational optic flow experienced in the lateral visual field of each eye. In wider tunnels, bumblebees use translational optic flow cues in the ventral visual field to control their lateral position and to steer along straight tracks...
April 20, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421281/hearing-diversity-in-moths-confronting-a-neotropical-bat-assemblage
#3
Ariadna Cobo-Cuan, Manfred Kössl, Emanuel C Mora
The tympanal ear is an evolutionary acquisition which helps moths survive predation from bats. The greater diversity of bats and echolocation strategies in the Neotropics compared with temperate zones would be expected to impose different sensory requirements on the neotropical moths. However, even given some variability among moth assemblages, the frequencies of best hearing of moths from different climate zones studied to date have been roughly the same: between 20 and 60 kHz. We have analyzed the auditory characteristics of tympanate moths from Cuba, a neotropical island with high levels of bat diversity and a high incidence of echolocation frequencies above those commonly at the upper limit of moths' hearing sensitivity...
April 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405761/adaptive-responses-of-peripheral-lateral-line-nerve-fibres-to-sinusoidal-wave-stimuli
#4
Joachim Mogdans, Christina Müller, Maren Frings, Ferdinand Raap
Sensory adaptation is characterized by a reduction in the firing frequency of neurons to prolonged stimulation, also called spike frequency adaptation. This has been documented for sensory neurons of the visual, olfactory, electrosensory, and auditory system both in response to constant-amplitude and to sinusoidal stimuli, but has thus far not been described systematically for the lateral line system. We recorded neuronal activity from primary afferent nerve fibres in the lateral line in goldfish in response to sinusoidal wave stimuli...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401311/development-of-site-fidelity-in-the-nocturnal-amblypygid-phrynus-marginemaculatus
#5
Jacob M Graving, Verner P Bingman, Eileen A Hebets, Daniel D Wiegmann
Amblypygids are capable of navigation in the complex terrain of rainforests in near complete darkness. Path integration is unnecessary for successful homing, and the alternative mechanisms by which they navigate have yet to be elucidated. Here, our aims were to determine whether the amblypygid Phrynus marginemaculatus could be trained to reliably return to a target shelter in a laboratory arena-indicating goal recognition-and to document changes in behavior associated with the development of fidelity. We recorded nocturnal movements and space use by individuals over five nights in an arena in which subjects were provided with two shelters that differed in quality...
April 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28365788/the-magnetic-map-sense-and-its-use-in-fine-tuning-the-migration-programme-of-birds
#6
REVIEW
D Heyers, D Elbers, M Bulte, F Bairlein, H Mouritsen
The Earth's magnetic field is one of several natural cues, which migratory birds can use to derive directional ("compass") information for orientation on their biannual migratory journeys. Moreover, magnetic field effects on prominent aspects of the migratory programme of birds, such as migratory restlessness behaviour, fuel deposition and directional orientation, implicate that geomagnetic information can also be used to derive positional ("map") information. While the magnetic "compass" in migratory birds is likely to be based on radical pair-forming molecules embedded in their visual system, the sensory correlates underlying a magnetic "map" sense currently remain elusive...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361169/magnetic-activation-in-the-brain-of-the-migratory-northern-wheatear-oenanthe-oenanthe
#7
D Elbers, M Bulte, F Bairlein, H Mouritsen, D Heyers
Behavioural and neurobiological evidence suggests the involvement of the visual and trigeminal sensory systems in avian magnetoreception. The constantly growing array of new genetic approaches becoming available to scientists would bear great potential to contribute to a generally accepted understanding of the mechanisms underlying this ability, but would require to breed migratory birds in captivity. Here we show that the transcontinental night-migratory Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe), which is currently the only migratory songbird successfully being bred in reasonable numbers in captivity, shows magnetic-field-induced neuronal activation in the trigeminal brainstem areas receiving their input through the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361168/influence-of-leptin-and-gabab-receptor-agonist-and-antagonist-on-neurons-of-the-hypothalamic-infundibular-nucleus-in-the-chicken
#8
S Bogatyrev, K S Yakimova, B Tzschentke
In birds and mammals, the neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance is conserved in many aspects. Despite significant similarities between the two groups, differences in the regulatory mechanisms were detected. The present study was performed to carry out investigations of the influence of human leptin and GABAB-receptor agonist and antagonist on the firing rate of neurons of the Nucleus infundibuli hypothalami in brain slices from juvenile chickens. For the first time, we demonstrated a clear, dose-related change in the firing rate of hypothalamic neurons in juvenile chickens after the acute application of recombinant human leptin (1, 10, and 100 nM)...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343237/actogram-analysis-of-free-flying-migratory-birds-new-perspectives-based-on-acceleration-logging
#9
REVIEW
Johan Bäckman, Arne Andersson, Lykke Pedersen, Sissel Sjöberg, Anders P Tøttrup, Thomas Alerstam
The use of accelerometers has become an important part of biologging techniques for large-sized birds with accelerometer data providing information about flight mode, wing-beat pattern, behaviour and energy expenditure. Such data show that birds using much energy-saving soaring/gliding flight like frigatebirds and swifts can stay airborne without landing for several months. Successful accelerometer studies have recently been conducted also for free-flying small songbirds during their entire annual cycle. Here we review the principles and possibilities for accelerometer studies in bird migration...
March 25, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341866/mapping-brain-structure-and-function-cellular-resolution-global-perspective
#10
REVIEW
Günther K H Zupanc
A comprehensive understanding of the brain requires analysis, although from a global perspective, with cellular, and even subcellular, resolution. An important step towards this goal involves the establishment of three-dimensional high-resolution brain maps, incorporating brain-wide information about the cells and their connections, as well as the chemical architecture. The progress made in such anatomical brain mapping in recent years has been paralleled by the development of physiological techniques that enable investigators to generate global neural activity maps, also with cellular resolution, while simultaneously recording the organism's behavioral activity...
March 24, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332031/how-do-energy-stores-and-changes-in-these-affect-departure-decisions-by-migratory-birds-a-critical-view-on-stopover-ecology-studies-and-some-future-perspectives
#11
REVIEW
Heiko Schmaljohann, Cas Eikenaar
In birds, accumulating energy is far slower than spending energy during flight. During migration, birds spend, therefore, most of the time at stopover refueling energy used during the previous flight. This elucidates why current energy stores and actual rate of accumulating energy are likely crucial factors influencing bird's decision when to resume migration in addition to other intrinsic (sex, age) and extrinsic (predation, weather) factors modulating the decision within the innate migration program. After first summarizing how energy stores and stopover durations are generally determined, we critically review that high-energy stores and low rates of accumulating energy were significantly related to high departure probabilities in several bird groups...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315939/the-transient-potassium-outward-current-has-different-roles-in-modulating-the-pyloric-and-gastric-mill-rhythms-in-the-stomatogastric-ganglion
#12
Lin Zhu, Allen I Selverston, Joseph Ayers
The crustacean stomatogastric nervous system is a classic model for understanding the effects of modulating ionic currents and synapses at both the cell and network levels. The stomatogastric ganglion in this system contains two distinct central pattern generators: a slow gastric mill network that generates flexible rhythmic outputs (8-20 s) and is often silent, and a fast pyloric network that generates more consistent rhythmic outputs (0.5-2 s) and is always active in vitro. Different ionic conductances contribute to the properties of individual neurons and therefore to the overall dynamics of the pyloric and gastric mill networks...
March 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299428/the-avian-hippocampus-and-the-hypothetical-maps-used-by-navigating-migratory-birds-with-some-reflection-on-compasses-and-migratory-restlessness
#13
Verner P Bingman, Scott A MacDougall-Shackleton
The homology between the avian hippocampal formation (HF) and mammalian hippocampus nurtures the expectation that HF plays a fundamental role in navigation by migratory birds. Indeed, HF of migratory birds displays anatomical properties that differ from non-migratory species. Using a hypothetical framework of multiple maps of differing spatial resolution and range, homing pigeon data suggest that HF is important for navigating by landscape features near familiar breeding, over-wintering, and stop-over sites...
March 16, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289837/navigation
#14
Roswitha Wiltschko
Experiments with migrating birds displaced during autumn migration outside their normal migration corridor reveal two different navigational strategies: adult migrants compensate for the displacement, and head towards their traditional wintering areas, whereas young first-time migrants continue in their migratory direction. Young birds are guided to their still unknown goal by a genetically coded migration program that indicates duration and direction(s) of the migratory flight by controlling the amount of migratory restlessness and the compass course(s) with respect to the geomagnetic field and celestial rotation...
March 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283755/vasotocin-induces-sexually-dimorphic-effects-on-acoustically-guided-behavior-in-a-tropical-frog
#15
Alexander T Baugh, Michael J Ryan
The neuropeptide arginine vasotocin (AVT) promotes sexual advertisement and influences vocalization structure in male anuran amphibians. In the present study, we used wild túngara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus) to investigate the effects of AVT on phonotaxis in males and females-thereby controlling for potential task differences between the sexes. Using a combined within- and between-subjects design, we showed that acoustic choice behavior in female frogs is not influenced by injection per se (vehicle) or by AVT...
March 10, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271185/to-transduce-a-zebra-finch-interrogating-behavioral-mechanisms-in-a-model-system-for-speech
#16
Jonathan B Heston, Stephanie A White
The ability to alter neuronal gene expression, either to affect levels of endogenous molecules or to express exogenous ones, is a powerful tool for linking brain and behavior. Scientists continue to finesse genetic manipulation in mice. Yet mice do not exhibit every behavior of interest. For example, Mus musculus do not readily imitate sounds, a trait known as vocal learning and a feature of speech. In contrast, thousands of bird species exhibit this ability. The circuits and underlying molecular mechanisms appear similar between disparate avian orders and are shared with humans...
March 7, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28260189/behavioral-pieces-of-neuroethological-puzzles
#17
Kenneth C Catania
In this review, I give a first-person account of surprising insights that have come from the behavioral dimension of neuroethological studies in my laboratory. These studies include the early attempts to understand the function of the nose in star-nosed moles and to explore its representation in the neocortex. This led to the discovery of a somatosensory fovea that parallels the visual fovea of primates in several ways. Subsequent experiments to investigate the assumed superiority of star-nosed moles to their relatives when locating food led to the unexpected discovery of stereo olfaction in common moles...
March 4, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251296/hard-shell-mating-in-neohelice-granulata-the-role-of-ecdysone-in-female-receptivity-and-mate-attraction
#18
María P Sal Moyano, Tomás Luppi, Daniel A Medesani, Colin L McLay, Enrique M Rodríguez
Most brachyuran females become receptive during the intermolt period, a condition considered "derived". However, as far as we know, studies testing the existence and function of pheromones in decapods are based on species which have mating linked to molting, a condition considered as "ancestral". For the first time, we studied some physiological and morphological processes involved in Neohelice granulata intermolt female crabs becoming receptive and potentially attracting males. We found that receptive females have mobile vulvae opercula due to a softening process of the cuticle hinge which showed lower calcium levels compared to the hinge of unreceptive females...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28247016/satiation-level-affects-anti-predatory-decisions-in-foraging-juvenile-crayfish
#19
Abigail C Schadegg, Jens Herberholz
Moving shadows signify imminent threat to foraging juvenile crayfish, and the animals respond with one of two discrete anti-predatory behaviors: They either freeze in place or rapidly flex their tails, which quickly propels them away from the approaching danger signal. Although a freeze might be the more risky choice, it keeps the animal near the expected food reward, while a tail-flip is effective in avoiding the shadow, but puts critical distance between the animal and its next meal. We manipulated the satiation level of juvenile crayfish to determine whether their behavioral choices are affected by internal energy states...
February 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28247015/seasonal-plasticity-of-auditory-saccular-sensitivity-in-sneaker-type-ii-male-plainfin-midshipman-fish-porichthys-notatus
#20
Ashwin A Bhandiwad, Elizabeth A Whitchurch, Orphal Colleye, David G Zeddies, Joseph A Sisneros
Adult female and nesting (type I) male midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) exhibit an adaptive form of auditory plasticity for the enhanced detection of social acoustic signals. Whether this adaptive plasticity also occurs in "sneaker" type II males is unknown. Here, we characterize auditory-evoked potentials recorded from hair cells in the saccule of reproductive and non-reproductive "sneaker" type II male midshipman to determine whether this sexual phenotype exhibits seasonal, reproductive state-dependent changes in auditory sensitivity and frequency response to behaviorally relevant auditory stimuli...
February 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
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