journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Annual Review of Plant Biology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29166128/the-oxylipin-pathways-biochemistry-and-function
#1
Claus Wasternack, Ivo Feussner
Plant oxylipins form a constantly growing group of signaling molecules that comprise oxygenated fatty acids and metabolites derived therefrom. In the last decade, the understanding of biosynthesis, metabolism, and action of oxylipins, especially jasmonates, has dramatically improved. Additional mechanistic insights into the action of enzymes and insights into signaling pathways have been deepened for jasmonates. For other oxylipins, such as the hydroxy fatty acids, individual signaling properties and cross talk between different oxylipins or even with additional phytohormones have recently been described...
November 20, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144774/strategies-for-enhanced-crop-resistance-to-insect-pests
#2
Angela E Douglas
Insect pests are responsible for substantial crop losses worldwide through direct damage and transmission of plant diseases, and novel approaches that complement or replace broad-spectrum chemical insecticides will facilitate the sustainable intensification of food production in the coming decades. Multiple strategies for improved crop resistance to insect pests, especially strategies relating to plant secondary metabolism and immunity and microbiome science, are becoming available. Recent advances in metabolic engineering of plant secondary chemistry offer the promise of specific toxicity or deterrence to insect pests; improved understanding of plant immunity against insects provides routes to optimize plant defenses against insects; and the microbiomes of insect pests can be exploited, either as a target or as a vehicle for delivery of insecticidal agents...
November 16, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29140727/population-genomics-of-herbicide-resistance-adaptation-via-evolutionary-rescue
#3
Julia M Kreiner, John R Stinchcombe, Stephen I Wright
The evolution of herbicide resistance in weed populations is a highly replicated example of adaptation surmounting the race against extinction, but the factors determining its rate and nature remain poorly understood. Here, we explore theory and empirical evidence for the importance of population genetic parameters-including effective population size, dominance, mutational target size, and gene flow-in influencing the probability and mode of herbicide resistance adaptation and its variation across species. We compiled data on the number of resistance mutations across populations for 79 herbicide-resistant species...
November 15, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28846438/my-secret-life
#4
Mary-Dell Chilton
In my early childhood, my parents gave me to my maternal grandparents for a "visit" that extended over a period of nine years. I seemed to be a fairly ordinary student in primary grades, and had to take a remedial general science class upon entering high school, my first exposure to science. It was the teacher of that class, Mr. Auer, who told me that I had scored amazingly high on a science aptitude test given to all freshmen. The people who administered the testing were convinced that I must have cheated somehow...
August 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226238/defense-priming-an-adaptive-part-of-induced-resistance
#5
REVIEW
Brigitte Mauch-Mani, Ivan Baccelli, Estrella Luna, Victor Flors
Priming is an adaptive strategy that improves the defensive capacity of plants. This phenomenon is marked by an enhanced activation of induced defense mechanisms. Stimuli from pathogens, beneficial microbes, or arthropods, as well as chemicals and abiotic cues, can trigger the establishment of priming by acting as warning signals. Upon stimulus perception, changes may occur in the plant at the physiological, transcriptional, metabolic, and epigenetic levels. This phase is called the priming phase. Upon subsequent challenge, the plant effectively mounts a faster and/or stronger defense response that defines the postchallenge primed state and results in increased resistance and/or stress tolerance...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226237/novel-insights-into-tree-biology-and-genome-evolution-as-revealed-through-genomics
#6
REVIEW
David B Neale, Pedro J Martínez-García, Amanda R De La Torre, Sara Montanari, Xiao-Xin Wei
Reference genome sequences are the key to the discovery of genes and gene families that determine traits of interest. Recent progress in sequencing technologies has enabled a rapid increase in genome sequencing of tree species, allowing the dissection of complex characters of economic importance, such as fruit and wood quality and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although the number of reference genome sequences for trees lags behind those for other plant species, it is not too early to gain insight into the unique features that distinguish trees from nontree plants...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226236/new-strategies-and-tools-in-quantitative-genetics-how-to-go-from-the-phenotype-to-the-genotype
#7
REVIEW
Christos Bazakos, Mathieu Hanemian, Charlotte Trontin, José M Jiménez-Gómez, Olivier Loudet
Quantitative genetics has a long history in plants: It has been used to study specific biological processes, identify the factors important for trait evolution, and breed new crop varieties. These classical approaches to quantitative trait locus mapping have naturally improved with technology. In this review, we show how quantitative genetics has evolved recently in plants and how new developments in phenotyping, population generation, sequencing, gene manipulation, and statistics are rejuvenating both the classical linkage mapping approaches (for example, through nested association mapping) as well as the more recently developed genome-wide association studies...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226235/plant-mitochondrial-genomes-dynamics-and-mechanisms-of-mutation
#8
REVIEW
José M Gualberto, Kathleen J Newton
The large mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms are unusually dynamic because of recombination activities involving repeated sequences. These activities generate subgenomic forms and extensive genomic variation even within the same species. Such changes in genome structure are responsible for the rapid evolution of plant mitochondrial DNA and for the variants associated with cytoplasmic male sterility and abnormal growth phenotypes. Nuclear genes modulate these processes, and over the past decade, several of these genes have been identified...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226234/zooming-in-on-plant-hormone-analysis-tissue-and-cell-specific-approaches
#9
REVIEW
Ondřej Novák, Richard Napier, Karin Ljung
Plant hormones are a group of naturally occurring, low-abundance organic compounds that influence physiological processes in plants. Our knowledge of the distribution profiles of phytohormones in plant organs, tissues, and cells is still incomplete, but advances in mass spectrometry have enabled significant progress in tissue- and cell-type-specific analyses of phytohormones over the last decade. Mass spectrometry is able to simultaneously identify and quantify hormones and their related substances. Biosensors, on the other hand, offer continuous monitoring; can visualize local distributions and real-time quantification; and, in the case of genetically encoded biosensors, are noninvasive...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226233/chemical-genetic-dissection-of-membrane-trafficking
#10
REVIEW
Lorena Norambuena, Ricardo Tejos
The plant endomembrane system is an extensively connected functional unit for exchanging material between compartments. Secretory and endocytic pathways allow dynamic trafficking of proteins, lipids, and other molecules, regulating a myriad of biological processes. Chemical genetics-the use of compounds to perturb biological processes in a fast, tunable, and transient manner-provides elegant tools for investigating this system. Here, we review how chemical genetics has helped to elucidate different aspects of membrane trafficking...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226232/the-epigenome-and-transcriptional-dynamics-of-fruit-ripening
#11
REVIEW
James Giovannoni, Cuong Nguyen, Betsy Ampofo, Silin Zhong, Zhangjun Fei
Fruit has evolved myriad forms that facilitate seed dispersal in varied environmental and ecological contexts. Because fleshy fruits become attractive and nutritious to seed-dispersing animals, the transition from unripe to ripe fruit represents a dramatic shift in survival strategy-from protecting unripe fruit against damaging animals to making it appealing to those same animals once ripened. For optimal fitness, ripening therefore must be tightly controlled and coordinated with seed development. Fruits, like many vegetative tissues of plants that contribute to human diets, are also subject to decay, which is enhanced as a consequence of the ripening transition...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226231/cell-biology-of-the-plant-nucleus
#12
REVIEW
Iris Meier, Eric J Richards, David E Evans
The eukaryotic nucleus is enclosed by the nuclear envelope, which is perforated by the nuclear pores, the gateways of macromolecular exchange between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. The nucleoplasm is organized in a complex three-dimensional fashion that changes over time and in response to stimuli. Within the cell, the nucleus must be viewed as an organelle (albeit a gigantic one) that is a recipient of cytoplasmic forces and capable of morphological and positional dynamics. The most dramatic reorganization of this organelle occurs during mitosis and meiosis...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226230/genomics-physiology-and-molecular-breeding-approaches-for-improving-salt-tolerance
#13
REVIEW
Abdelbagi M Ismail, Tomoaki Horie
Salt stress reduces land and water productivity and contributes to poverty and food insecurity. Increased salinization caused by human practices and climate change is progressively reducing agriculture productivity despite escalating calls for more food. Plant responses to salt stress are well understood, involving numerous critical processes that are each controlled by multiple genes. Knowledge of the critical mechanisms controlling salt uptake and exclusion from functioning tissues, signaling of salt stress, and the arsenal of protective metabolites is advancing...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28142283/the-role-of-plant-innate-immunity-in-the-legume-rhizobium-symbiosis
#14
REVIEW
Yangrong Cao, Morgan K Halane, Walter Gassmann, Gary Stacey
A classic view of the evolution of mutualism is that it derives from a pathogenic relationship that attenuated over time to a situation in which both partners can benefit. If this is the case for rhizobia, then one might uncover features of the symbiosis that reflect this earlier pathogenic state. For example, as with plant pathogens, it is now generally assumed that rhizobia actively suppress the host immune response to allow infection and symbiosis establishment. Likewise, the host has retained mechanisms to control the nutrient supply to the symbionts and the number of nodules so that they do not become too burdensome...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28142282/trade-offs-between-plant-growth-and-defense-against-insect-herbivory-an-emerging-mechanistic-synthesis
#15
REVIEW
Tobias Züst, Anurag A Agrawal
Costs of defense are central to our understanding of interactions between organisms and their environment, and defensive phenotypes of plants have long been considered to be constrained by trade-offs that reflect the allocation of limiting resources. Recent advances in uncovering signal transduction networks have revealed that defense trade-offs are often the result of regulatory "decisions" by the plant, enabling it to fine-tune its phenotype in response to diverse environmental challenges. We place these results in the context of classic studies in ecology and evolutionary biology, and propose a unifying framework for growth-defense trade-offs as a means to study the plant's allocation of limiting resources...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125287/guilt-by-association-a-phenotype-based-view-of-the-plant-phosphoinositide-network
#16
REVIEW
Katharina Gerth, Feng Lin, Wilhelm Menzel, Praveen Krishnamoorthy, Irene Stenzel, Mareike Heilmann, Ingo Heilmann
Eukaryotic membranes contain small amounts of phospholipids that have regulatory effects on the physiological functions of cells, tissues, and organs. Phosphoinositides (PIs)-the phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol-are one example of such regulatory lipids. Although PIs were described in plants decades ago, their contribution to the regulation of physiological processes in plants is not well understood. In the past few years, evidence has emerged that PIs are essential for plant function and development...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125286/plant-biodiversity-change-across-scales-during-the-anthropocene
#17
REVIEW
Mark Vellend, Lander Baeten, Antoine Becker-Scarpitta, Véronique Boucher-Lalonde, Jenny L McCune, Julie Messier, Isla H Myers-Smith, Dov F Sax
Plant communities have undergone dramatic changes in recent centuries, although not all such changes fit with the dominant biodiversity-crisis narrative used to describe them. At the global scale, future declines in plant species diversity are highly likely given habitat conversion in the tropics, although few extinctions have been documented for the Anthropocene to date (<0.1%). Nonnative species introductions have greatly increased plant species richness in many regions of the world at the same time that they have led to the creation of new hybrid polyploid species by bringing previously isolated congeners into close contact...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125285/the-life-and-death-of-a-plant-cell
#18
REVIEW
Mehdi Kabbage, Ryan Kessens, Lyric C Bartholomay, Brett Williams
Like all eukaryotic organisms, plants possess an innate program for controlled cellular demise termed programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the functional conservation of PCD across broad evolutionary distances, an understanding of the molecular machinery underpinning this fundamental program in plants remains largely elusive. As in mammalian PCD, the regulation of plant PCD is critical to development, homeostasis, and proper responses to stress. Evidence is emerging that autophagy is key to the regulation of PCD in plants and that it can dictate the outcomes of PCD execution under various scenarios...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125284/biogenesis-and-metabolic-maintenance-of-rubisco
#19
REVIEW
Andreas Bracher, Spencer M Whitney, F Ulrich Hartl, Manajit Hayer-Hartl
Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) mediates the fixation of atmospheric CO2 in photosynthesis by catalyzing the carboxylation of the 5-carbon sugar ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). Rubisco is a remarkably inefficient enzyme, fixing only 2-10 CO2 molecules per second. Efforts to increase crop yields by bioengineering Rubisco remain unsuccessful, owing in part to the complex cellular machinery required for Rubisco biogenesis and metabolic maintenance. The large subunit of Rubisco requires the chaperonin system for folding, and recent studies have shown that assembly of hexadecameric Rubisco is mediated by specific assembly chaperones...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125283/plastoglobuli-plastid-microcompartments-with-integrated-functions-in-metabolism-plastid-developmental-transitions-and-environmental-adaptation
#20
REVIEW
Klaas J van Wijk, Felix Kessler
Plastoglobuli (PGs) are plastid lipoprotein particles surrounded by a membrane lipid monolayer. PGs contain small specialized proteomes and metabolomes. They are present in different plastid types (e.g., chloroplasts, chromoplasts, and elaioplasts) and are dynamic in size and shape in response to abiotic stress or developmental transitions. PGs in chromoplasts are highly enriched in carotenoid esters and enzymes involved in carotenoid metabolism. PGs in chloroplasts are associated with thylakoids and contain ∼30 core proteins (including six ABC1 kinases) as well as additional proteins recruited under specific conditions...
April 28, 2017: Annual Review of Plant Biology
journal
journal
40122
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"