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Practical Neurology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073921/parascapular-muscle-atrophy-as-a-delayed-effect-of-radiation-treatment
#1
EDITORIAL
Shivam Om Mittal, Bashar Katirji
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 10, 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073920/sweet-food-preference-in-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis
#2
EDITORIAL
Martin R Turner, Kevin Talbot
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 10, 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974376/navigating-the-island-of-reil-how-to-understand-the-insular-cortex
#3
EDITORIAL
Ray Wynford-Thomas, Rob Powell
Insular-onset seizures are rare and easily misdiagnosed. In this article, we aim to highlight the often distinctive semiology of seizures involving the insula with reference to three cases. We suggest three points to aid the recognition of seizures involving the insula: (1) Seizures originating in the insula frequently present with a sensation of laryngeal constriction, dyspnoea or unpleasant somatosensory symptoms; (2) Seizures involving the anterior insula may have a silent onset, but tend to propagate rapidly to motor areas causing motor or hypermotor symptoms; (3) Seizures involving the posterior insula cause somatosensory symptoms, which are normally contralateral to the seizure onset...
December 14, 2016: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27941127/leprosy-in-a-patient-infected-with-hiv
#4
Clare M Galtrey, Hamid Modarres, Zane Jaunmuktane, Sebastian Brandner, Alexander M Rossor, Diana Nj Lockwood, Mary M Reilly, Hadi Manji, Fred Schon
A 60-year-old Nigerian man, who had lived in Europe for 30 years but had returned home frequently, presented with right frontalis muscle weakness and right ulnar nerve palsy, without skin lesions. Neurophysiology showed a generalised neuropathy with demyelinating features. Blood tests were positive for HIV, with a normal CD4 count. There was nerve thickening both clinically and on MRI. Nerve biopsy showed chronic endoneuritis and perineuritis (indicating leprosy) without visible mycobacteria. His neuropathy continued to deteriorate (lepra reaction) before starting treatment with WHO multidrug therapy, highly active antiretroviral therapy and corticosteroids...
December 9, 2016: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27927777/internuclear-ophthalmoplegia
#5
Jonathan D Virgo, Gordon T Plant
A brainstem lesion of any type that involves the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) can cause internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO). This primarily affects conjugate horizontal gaze and classically manifests as impaired adduction ipsilateral to the lesion and abduction nystagmus contralateral to the lesion. Here, we describe the anatomy of the MLF and review the clinical features of INO. We also describe conjugate horizontal gaze palsy and some of the 'INO-plus' syndromes.
December 7, 2016: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27927776/clinicopathological-case-progressive-cognitive-decline-with-gait-disturbance-in-a-steel-worker
#6
Fiona C Moreton, Robert Brenner, Jayam Lazarus, Richard Davenport
A 57-year-old male steel plant worker presented with fatigue and altered liver function tests. Over the next two years, he developed cognitive decline, parkinsonism and seizures. This paper reports the clinicopathological conference at the 37th Edinburgh Advanced Neurology Course 2015 and outlines what we can learn from this case.
December 7, 2016: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27927775/memantine-induced-chorea-and-dystonia
#7
Letizia Goncalves Borges, Borna Bonakdarpour
Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist and probably also has an indirect dopaminergic action at high concentrations. We describe a person with Alzheimer's disease who developed chorea and dystonia after inadvertently doubling of her daily dose by taking extended-release (XR) memantine twice daily, rather than once daily (planned dose memantine XR, 21 mg once daily), after the drug was switched from immediate release (IR, 10 mg twice daily). Memantine is rarely associated with movement disorders, but this case emphasises the need for awareness of potential problems when switching from memantine IR to XR...
December 7, 2016: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903764/epilepsy-and-music-practical-notes
#8
REVIEW
M Maguire
Music processing occurs via a complex network of activity far beyond the auditory cortices. This network may become sensitised to music or may be recruited as part of a temporal lobe seizure, manifesting as either musicogenic epilepsy or ictal musical phenomena. The idea that sound waves may directly affect brain waves has led researchers to explore music as therapy for epilepsy. There is limited and low quality evidence of an antiepileptic effect with the Mozart Sonata K.448. We do not have a pathophysiological explanation for the apparent dichotomous effect of music on seizures...
November 30, 2016: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100718/abn-news
#9
Joanne Lawrence, David J Burn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100717/a-country-doctor-s-notebook-mikhail-bulgakov
#10
Malcolm Proudfoot
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100716/carphology
#11
A Fo Ben
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100715/highlights-from-this-issue
#12
Phil Em Smith, Geraint N Fuller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073924/temporary-replacements-for-oral-epilepsy-treatments
#13
EDITORIAL
Sanjay M Sisodiya
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073923/what-to-do-when-patients-with-epilepsy-cannot-take-their-usual-oral-medications
#14
Anna M Bank, Jong Woo Lee, Patricia Krause, Aaron L Berkowitz
When people with epilepsy are hospitalised for medical or surgical conditions, they may be unable to take their home antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Such 'nil by mouth' people with epilepsy require alternative AED regimens to prevent breakthrough seizures. Here, we describe several strategies for maintaining seizure control in patients with epilepsy who have medical or surgical contraindications to their home oral regimens. These strategies include using non-pill oral formulations, using an intravenous formulation of the patient's home AED(s), using a benzodiazepine bridge and/or using alternative intravenous AED(s) when there are no intravenous formulations...
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073922/practical-neurology-linked-to-the-curriculum-an-online-resource
#15
EDITORIAL
Dilraj Sokhi, Alice Brockington, Christine Lo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28049738/when-the-heart-rules-the-head-ischaemic-stroke-and-intracerebral-haemorrhage-complicating-infective-endocarditis
#16
REVIEW
Estabrak Jiad, Sumanjit K Gill, Maria Krutikov, David Turner, Michael H Parkinson, Carmel Curtis, David J Werring
Sir William Osler meticulously described the clinical manifestations of infective endocarditis in 1885, concluding that: 'few diseases present greater difficulties in the way of diagnosis … which in many cases are practically insurmountable'. Even with modern investigation techniques, diagnosing infective endocarditis can be hugely challenging, yet is critically important in patients presenting with stroke (both cerebral infarction and intracranial haemorrhage), its commonest neurological complication. In ischaemic stroke, intravenous thrombolysis carries an unacceptably high risk of intracranial haemorrhage, while in intracerebral haemorrhage, mycotic aneurysms require urgent treatment to avoid rebleeding, and in all cases, prompt treatment with antibiotics and valve surgery may be life-saving...
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27974377/sleep-apnoea-and-the-neurologist
#17
REVIEW
Shuli Cheng, Catherine D Stark, Richard J Stark
There is increasing awareness and interest in the complex and extensive inter-relationships between sleep disorders and neurological disorders. This review focuses on the clinical interactions between obstructive sleep apnoea and stroke, headaches, epilepsy, cognition and idiopathic Parkinson's disease. We highlight to the neurologist the importance of taking a sleep history and considering the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903766/sudden-unexpected-death-in-epilepsy-measures-to-reduce-risk
#18
REVIEW
Brendan Mclean, Rohit Shankar, Jane Hanna, Caryn Jory, Craig Newman
This review looks at the strategies that may help to reduce the risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy beyond that of trying to achieve seizure cessation, which is not possible for up to 30% of patients with epilepsy. These strategies include seizure safety checklists, mobile phone technology, telehealth and various devices currently available or in development. We highlight interventions where there is evidence of benefit, and draw attention for the need both to involve patients with epilepsy in risk reduction and to improve communication with those at risk...
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903765/the-mini-mental-state-examination-pitfalls-and-limitations
#19
Emma Devenney, John R Hodges
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Practical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27895189/how-to-do-it-bedside-ultrasound-to-assist-lumbar-puncture
#20
Stefan Williams, Modar Khalil, Asoka Weerasinghe, Anu Sharma, Richard Davey
For many neurologists, lumbar puncture is the only practical procedure that they undertake on a regular basis. Although anaesthetists and emergency physicians routinely employ ultrasound to assist lumbar puncture, neurologists do not. In this article, we outline the technique that we use for an ultrasound-assisted lumbar puncture, together with the evidence base that suggests that ultrasound has significant benefits. We aim to raise awareness of a method that can make lumbar puncture more likely to succeed and to be more comfortable for the patient...
January 2017: Practical Neurology
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