journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29779863/the-global-epidemiology-of-preterm-birth
#1
REVIEW
Joshua P Vogel, Saifon Chawanpaiboon, Ann-Beth Moller, Kanokwaroon Watananirun, Mercedes Bonet, Pisake Lumbiganon
This article is a part of a series that focuses on the current state of evidence and practice related to preterm birth prevention. We provide an overview of current knowledge (and limitations) on the global epidemiology of preterm birth, particularly around how preterm birth is defined, measured, and classified, and what is known regarding its risk factors, causes, and outcomes. Despite the reported associations between preterm birth and a wide range of socio-demographic, medical, obstetric, fetal, and environmental factors, approximately two-thirds of preterm births occur without an evident risk factor...
April 26, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29754741/preface
#2
EDITORIAL
Aris T Papageorghiou
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 25, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29778458/noninvasive-diagnosis-of-endometriosis-review-of-current-peripheral-blood-and-endometrial-biomarkers
#3
REVIEW
Dorien F O, Idhaliz Flores, Etienne Waelkens, Thomas D'Hooghe
A noninvasive biomarker-based test could help shorten the diagnostic delay for endometriosis. The most investigated biomarker sources are peripheral blood and endometrium. Discovery of endometriosis biomarkers is often hypothesis-driven, i.e. when one or a few biomarkers are investigated based on their role in the disease pathogenesis. Alternatively, a hypothesis-generating approach has been followed using the "omics" technologies. A variety of biomarkers for endometriosis have been investigated, but no biomarker has been validated for clinical use...
April 13, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724667/preventing-preterm-birth-new-approaches-to-labour-therapeutics-using-nanoparticles
#4
REVIEW
Jonathan W Paul, Roger Smith
Preterm birth remains a major obstetric problem with ramifications that extend beyond immediate health and safety concerns for the newborn to include massive societal and economic burden. Although three quarters of preterm birth-related deaths could be prevented with cost-effective interventions, there has been little progress towards achieving sustained tocolysis that translates into improved outcomes for the newborn. With private enterprise reluctant to venture into the sphere of tocolysis, due to potential litigation, advances in the field may fall to new approaches using existing tocolytic resources more effectively...
April 13, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724668/rationale-for-current-and-future-progestin-based-therapies-to-prevent-preterm-birth
#5
REVIEW
Megan Weatherborn, Sam Mesiano
Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. The only medicinal therapy currently recommended to prevent PTB is prophylactic progestin therapy in the form of micronized progesterone (P4) administered daily via vaginal suppository from the 24th to the 34th week of gestation or 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate in oil administered weekly from the 16th to the 36th week of gestation via an intramuscular injection. These therapies decrease the risk of PTB in women with an elevated risk of PTB indicated by a history of PTB or by a short cervix measured by sonography at mid-gestation...
April 11, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29753695/the-microbiome-in-preterm-birth
#6
REVIEW
Derrick M Chu, Maxim Seferovic, Ryan M Pace, Kjersti M Aagaard
The microbiome is thought to play a role in the maintenance of a healthy pregnancy and thus may either contribute to or protect from preterm birth. Study of the human microbiome has been aided by metagenomic sequencing approaches, providing greater insight into the commensal bacteria that coexist in and on our bodies. The vaginal microbiome has been the most widely studied, though there have been recent efforts to explore the gut, cervical-vaginal, placental and oral microbiomes in the further search of etiologies of preterm birth...
April 9, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29759932/examining-the-link-between-placental-pathology-growth-restriction-and-stillbirth
#7
REVIEW
Robert M Silver
Stillbirth, often defined as death of a fetus ≥20 weeks of gestation, is emotionally devastating for families and caregivers. It is often associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR). Indeed, FGR or small-for-gestational age fetus (SGA) is a major risk factor for stillbirth. In rare cases, this is due to genetic abnormalities or infections. However, in most cases, it is linked to placental insufficiency. This may be due to abnormal placental development or placental damage, thereby resulting in decreased blood flow, oxygen, and nutrients to the fetus...
March 26, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29656984/corrigendum-to-benign-and-malignant-pathology-of-the-uterus-best-pract-res-clin-obstet-gynaecol-46-2018-12-30
#8
V Tanos, K E Berry
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 14, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29550180/monitoring-fetal-growth-in-settings-with-limited-ultrasound-access
#9
REVIEW
Sikolia Z Wanyonyi, Steve K Mutiso
Abnormal fetal growth significantly increases neonatal mortality and the risk of stillbirth. This creates the need for accurately monitoring fetal growth in all pregnancies regardless of the risk status. Several methods used in clinical practice include abdominal palpation, symphysio-fundal height measurements, and obstetric ultrasound. Of these, obstetric ultrasound remains the most reliable and objective way to monitor fetal growth. However, in most low-resource areas, access to obstetric ultrasound remains poor and this leaves the two as the only options available...
March 14, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606482/planning-management-and-delivery-of-the-growth-restricted-fetus
#10
REVIEW
Ahmet A Baschat
A uniform approach to management of fetal growth restriction (FGR) improves outcome, prevents stillbirth, and allows appropriately timed delivery. An estimated fetal weight below the tenth percentile with coexisting abnormal umbilical artery (UA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), or cerebroplacental ratio Doppler index best identifies the small fetus requiring surveillance. Placental perfusion defects are more common earlier in gestation; accordingly, early-onset (≤32 weeks of gestation) and late-onset (>32 weeks) FGR differ in clinical phenotype...
March 1, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29571820/universal-screening-for-foetal-growth-restriction
#11
REVIEW
Gordon C S Smith
Foetal growth restriction (FGR) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Clinical methods for identifying women whose pregnancies are affected by FGR do not perform well. Despite this, the current approach to screening includes the clinical assessment of risk and targeted use of ultrasound. Universal screening of women using ultrasound has not been shown to improve outcomes in randomised controlled trials and, when implemented nationally in France, appeared mostly to change outcomes for the worse through the effect of iatrogenic prematurity on false positives...
February 27, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29571821/care-of-the-growth-restricted-newborn
#12
REVIEW
Bianca Carducci, Zulfiqar A Bhutta
With the first 1,000 days of life proving to be a critical window of opportunity for physical and cognitive growth and development, an optimal intrauterine environment is vital. If fetus needs are compromised prenatally, there is an increased risk of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and infants being born premature, low birth weight (LBW), or small-for-gestational age (SGA). Specialized care of these high-risk infants is necessary in terms of preconception interventions, resuscitation, thermoregulation, nutritional support and kangaroo mother care...
February 26, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29503125/disorders-of-sex-development
#13
REVIEW
Selma Feldman Witchel
Normal sex development depends on the precise spatio-temporal sequence and coordination of mutually antagonistic activating and repressing factors. These factors regulate the commitment of the unipotential gonad into the binary pathways governing normal sex development. Typically, the presence of the SRY gene on the Y chromosome triggers the cascade of molecular events that lead to male sex development. Disorders of sex development comprise a heterogeneous group of congenital conditions associated with atypical development of internal and external genitalia...
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29475769/preface
#14
EDITORIAL
Joseph S Sanfilippo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29422239/disorders-of-puberty
#15
REVIEW
Charles Sultan, Laura Gaspari, Laurent Maimoun, Nicolas Kalfa, Françoise Paris
Over the past 20 years, a clear secular trend toward the earlier onset of puberty has been described. A better knowledge should help clinicians attempting to define both precocious and delayed puberty (PP and DP, respectively). The definition of PP for girls is the appearance of secondary sex characteristics development before the age of 8 years, while DP is based on the absence of thelarche at the age of 13 years. Regarding PP, one should clinically distinguish between true precocious puberty, i.e., complete or central PP, and incomplete PP, which refers to premature thelarche, premature pubarche, and isolated menarche...
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239814/surgical-considerations-and-challenges-in-the-pediatric-and-adolescent-gynecologic-patient
#16
REVIEW
Serena H Chan, Eduardo Lara-Torre
It is important for practitioners to recognize that there are special considerations when performing gynecologic surgery in a pediatric or adolescent patient. A provider must be familiar with differences in anatomy, physiology, surgical technique, and psychosocial concerns. This can be challenging for a provider who does not routinely operate on patients in this population. A minimally invasive surgical approach is preferred in the pediatric and adolescent patient whenever possible. While a good command of laparoscopy in the adult patient is certainly a useful skill when operating on pediatric and adolescent patients, there are technical adaptations and challenges to consider...
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078976/abnormal-uterine-bleeding-including-coagulopathies-and-other-menstrual-disorders
#17
REVIEW
Efthimios Deligeoroglou, Vasileios Karountzos
Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) is a frequent cause of visits to the emergency department and a major reason for concern among adolescents and their families. The most common cause of AUB, in otherwise healthy adolescents, is ovulatory dysfunction, although 5-36% of adolescents who present with heavy menstrual bleeding, have an underlying bleeding disorder (BD). The most common form of BDs is von Willebrand Disease, reflecting 13% of adolescents with AUB. Management of AUB depends on the underlying etiology, the bleeding severity, as well as the need for hospitalization...
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28970006/an-overview-of-common-psychiatric-problems-among-adolescent-and-young-adult-females-focus-on-mood-and-anxiety
#18
REVIEW
Jessica J Black, Dana L Rofey
Adolescence is a dynamic period of learning and adaptation. It provides unique opportunities in which adolescents strive to become independent, generative young adults. However, with these strides come increased prevalence in psychiatric symptomatology. Among adolescent girls, anxiety disorders are the most common condition followed by mood disorders. Mood disorders, specifically depression, result in the greatest impairment. Factors such as body mass index and early pubertal onset are associated with poorer mental health such as depression...
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28919160/polycystic-ovary-syndrome-in-adolescents
#19
REVIEW
Stephanie S Rothenberg, Rachel Beverley, Emily Barnard, Massoud Baradaran-Shoraka, Joseph S Sanfilippo
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) typically manifests with a combination of menstrual dysfunction and evidence of hyperandrogenism in the adolescent population. No single cause has been identified; however, evidence suggests a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Polycystic ovary syndrome presents a particular diagnostic challenge in adolescents as normal pubertal changes can present with a similar phenotype. Management of PCOS in the adolescent population should focus on a multi-modal approach with lifestyle modification and pharmacologic treatment to address bothersome symptoms...
April 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29753694/physiological-adaptation-of-the-growth-restricted-fetus
#20
REVIEW
Karel Maršál
The growth-restricted fetus in utero is exposed to a hostile environment and suffers undernutrition and hypoxia. To cope with the stress, the fetus changes its physiological functions. These adaptive changes aid intrauterine survival; however, they can lead to permanent functional and structural changes that can contribute to the development of serious chronic diseases later in life. Epigenetic mechanisms are an important part of the pathophysiological processes behind this "developmental origin of adult diseases...
February 24, 2018: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
journal
journal
39765
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"