Read by QxMD icon Read

Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology

Gera D Te Raa, Arnon P Kater
Despite the availability of novel targeted agents, TP53 defects remain the most important adverse prognostic factor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Detection of deletion of TP53 locus (17p deletion) by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has become standard and performed prior to every line of treatment as the incidence dramatically increases as relapses occur. As monoallelic mutations of TP53 equally affect outcome, novel methods are being developed to improve detection of TP53 defects and include next-generation sequencing (NGS) and functional assays...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Carlos I Amaya-Chanaga, Laura Z Rassenti
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable clinical course. The Rai and Binet staging systems are often used to predict survival. However, they do not take into account other biological characteristics of CLL cells that may influence the disease course and response to treatment. Prognostic factors such as chromosome abnormalities (trisomy 12, 11q deletions and 17p deletions), β2 microglobulin, thymidine kinase, CD38 and ZAP-70 expression, IGHV mutation status, and mutations in genes such as NOTCH1, MYD88, SF3B1, and ATM are also predictors of prognosis...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Julio Delgado, Neus Villamor, Armando López-Guillermo, Elías Campo
Next-generation sequencing provides a comprehensive understanding of the genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic underpinnings of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Recent studies have uncovered new drivers, including mutations in non-coding regions, and signalling pathways whose role in cancer was previously unknown or poorly understood. Moreover, massive scale epigenomics and transcriptomics have supplied the foundations for the cellular origin of the disease. Some drivers could be targeted pharmacologically, and the ability to detect mutations present in minority subclones might even allow treatment before clonal selection occurs, thus preventing disease refractoriness...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Mohamed A Kharfan-Dabaja, Jessica El-Asmar, Farrukh T Awan, Mehdi Hamadani, Ernesto Ayala
Novel therapies targeting various kinases downstream of the B-cell receptor have emerged along with monoclonal antibodies and BCL-2 antagonists, and are changing the therapeutic landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, cure remains unattainable unless eligible patients are offered an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Access to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has expanded considerably with availability of reduced intensity conditioning regimens which is capable offering durable remissions even in poor-risk disease...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Michael Y Choi, Manoj Kumar Kashyap, Deepak Kumar
Malignant B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymphoid organs of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In the tissue compartments, CLL shape a protective microenvironment by coopting normal elements. The efficacy of drugs that target these interactions further underscores their importance in the pathogenesis of CLL. While the B cell receptor (BCR) pathway clearly plays a central role in the CLL microenvironment, there is also rationale to evaluate agents that inhibit other aspects or modulate the immune cells in the microenvironment...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Davide Rossi
Richter's syndrome (RS) is the development of an aggressive lymphoma in patients with a previous or concomitant diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The incidence rate for RS is ∼0.5% per year of observation. In the presence of clinical suspicious of RS, diagnosis of transformation and choice of the site of biopsy may take advantage of (18)FDG PET/CT. Molecular lesions of tumor suppression regulators (TP53), cell cycle (CDKN2A) and cell proliferation (NOTCH1, MYC) overall account for ∼90% of RS and may be responsible for its aggressive clinical phenotype...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Deepa Jeyakumar, Susan O'Brien
Inhibitors of the B cell receptor (BCR) represent an attractive therapeutic option for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Recently approved inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (ibrutinib) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (idelalisib), are promising agents because they are generally well tolerated and highly effective. These agents may be particularly important in the treatment of older patients who are less able to tolerate the myelosuppression (and infections) associated with chemoimmunotherapy...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Januario E Castro, Thomas J Kipps
Treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B cell malignancies is evolving very rapidly. We have observed the quick transition during the last couple of years, from chemo-immunotherapy based treatments to oral targeted therapies based on B cell receptor signaling and Bcl-2 inhibitors, as well as the increasing use of second generation glyco-engineered antibodies. The next wave of revolution in the treatment for this conditions is approaching and it will be based on strategies that harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Stephan A Grupp
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Brian Koffman, Andrew Schorr
The 21st century has seen rapid, positive changes in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia from the patient's perspective. New prognostic and predictive markers have ushered in the start of more precise and individualized therapy. For the first time, combined therapy [fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab] has been shown to prolong life significantly. Clinical trials have become more adaptive, faster and more patient friendly. Perhaps the greatest change of all is the development of novel oral agents (ibrutinib and idelalisib) and powerful monoclonal antibodies that offer robust and durable disease control...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Paula Cramer, Barbara Eichhorst, Hans Christian Reinhardt, Michael Hallek
Given the current dynamics in the development of novel agents for CLL therapy, the task to find optimal, non-toxic combinations has become the primary goal. This article gives an update of the most interesting novel drugs. The strategy of the German CLL Study Group to use these agents in combinations is described in detail, highlighting the strategy and first results of a recently started series of phase II combination trials, the BXX series using agents such as bendamustine, idelalisib, ibrutinib, obinutuzumab, ofatumumab and venetoclax...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Emili Montserrat, Tycho Bauman, Julio Delgado
Medicine has been 'personalized' (i.e. centred in persons) since its foundation. Recently, however, the term 'personalized medicine' (or, better, 'precision medicine') has been introduced to define 'a form of medicine that uses information about a person's genes, proteins, and environment to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease'. This concept has gained momentum thanks to next-generation-sequencing (NGS) techniques that allow identification of molecular characteristics unique to the patient and to the tumour...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Januario E Castro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Bartlomiej M Getta, Jae H Park, Martin S Tallman
This brief review highlights the sequence of therapeutic milestones and advances in our understanding of the biology of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) with a focus on recent molecular findings and how these may be applied to improve disease outcomes in the future. Targeted therapy is discussed in the context of the recently identified BRAF mutation and other genetic findings.
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Earl J Stone, Michael Margolin
Hairy cell leukemia is different from most other hematologic malignancies because it is so rare. Patient concerns include finding a knowledgeable physician, confirming the diagnosis at the initial presentation, coping with treatment side effects and monitoring for potential relapse of this chronic disease.
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Estella Matutes, Alejandra Martínez-Trillos, Elias Campo
Hairy cell leukaemia-variant (HCL-V) is a rare B-cell malignancy that affects elderly males and manifests with splenomegaly, lymphocytosis and cytopenias without monocytopenia. The neoplastic cells have morphological features of prolymphocytes and hairy cells. The immunophenotype is that of a clonal B-cell CD11c and CD103 positive but, unlike classical HCL, CD25, CD123 and CD200 negative. The spleen histology is similar to classical HCL and the pattern of bone marrow infiltration is interstitial and/or intrasinusoidal...
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Sascha Dietrich, Thorsten Zenz
Targeted treatment approaches are transforming the therapeutic landscape of cancer care. The discovery of the BRAF V600E mutation in most cases of classical hairy cell leukemia opens up unique opportunities for tumor specific treatment of HCL targeting the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. The discovery and biological implications of BRAF V600E in HCL are summarized to form a basis for our current understanding of the potential for clinical exploitation. There is overwhelming clinical evidence for activity of inhibitors of BRAF in the disease...
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Robert J Kreitman, Ira Pastan
Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is an indolent B-cell malignancy effectively treated but not often cured by purine analog therapy; after multiple courses of purine analogs, patients can become purine analog resistant and in need of alternative therapies. Complete remission to single-agent purine analog is often accompanied by minimal residual disease (MRD), residual HCL cells detectable by immunologic methods, considered a risk factor for eventual relapse. Several different non-chemotherapy approaches are being used to target relapsed and refractory HCL, including inhibitors of BRAF, but so far only monoclonal antibody (MAb)-based approaches have been reported to eliminate MRD in a high percentage of patients...
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Farhad Ravandi
Success in the treatment of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) over the last several decades is largely due to the high efficacy of the nucleoside analogs, cladribine and pentostatin. However, the relapse-free survival curves have not shown a plateau and many patients treated with these agents will eventually relapse. Although better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms in HCL have led to effective and novel options for the treatment of relapse, long term durability of the responses obtained with these agents still remains unclear...
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Monica Else, Claire E Dearden, Daniel Catovsky
Since 2006 when we last reviewed the literature concerning the use of purine analogues in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), results from several new and updated series have been published. Here we examine these reports and consider their implications for patient management. The two purine analogues pentostatin and cladribine remain the first-line treatments of choice for all patients with HCL. Although they have not been compared in randomised trials, they appear to be equally effective. A complete response is important for the long-term outcome and we look at how best this can be achieved...
December 2015: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"