journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195680/communication-of-alcohol-and-smoking-lifestyle-advice-to-the-gastroenterological-patient
#1
REVIEW
Andrew D Spence, Mais Khasawneh, Patrick B Allen, Jennifer Addley
Effective communication between healthcare staff and patients is central to development of the patient-professional relationship. Many barriers influence this communication, often resulting in patients' lack of understanding and retention of information, particularly affecting advice regarding lifestyle habits, such as alcohol consumption and smoking. Alcohol and smoking misuse are potentially modifiable risk factors known to adversely affect a variety of gastroenterological conditions and improvements in communication with patients regarding this is an important management component...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195679/impact-of-alcohol-smoking-on-the-surgical-management-of-gastrointestinal-patients
#2
REVIEW
Niall D Kennedy, Des C Winter
Alcohol and smoking are repeatedly described as modifiable risk factors in clinical studies across all surgical specialities. These lifestyle choices impart a sub-optimal physiology via multiple processes and play an important role in the surgical management of the gastrointestinal patient. Cessation is imperative to optimise the patient's fitness for surgery with surgery itself being a prime opportunity for sustained cessation. A consistent, planned and integrated management involving surgical, anaesthetic, medical, and primary care facets will aid in successful cessation and perioperative care...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195678/the-interaction-between-smoking-alcohol-and-the-gut-microbiome
#3
REVIEW
Gabriele Capurso, Edith Lahner
The gastrointestinal microbiome is a complex echosystem that establishes a symbiotic, mutually beneficial relation with the host, being rather stable in health, but affected by age, drugs, diet, alcohol, and smoking. Alcohol and smoking contribute to changes in the stomach and affect H pylori-related disorders including the risk of gastric cancer. In the small intestine and in the colon alcohol causes depletion of bacteria with anti-inflammatory activity, eventually resulting in intestinal damage with "leaky gut"...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195677/do-smoking-and-alcohol-behaviours-influence-gi-cancer-survival
#4
REVIEW
Úna C McMenamin, Stephen McCain, Andrew T Kunzmann
Little is known about the role of alcohol and smoking in GI cancer survival compared to GI cancer development. We systematically reviewed the evidence for a role of smoking and alcohol in prognosis among GI cancer patients and inform whether smoking or alcohol cessation interventions or guidelines for GI cancer patients are likely to improve prognosis. A total of 84 relevant studies were identified. Continued smokers, particularly heavy smokers, had worse prognosis than never smokers in most GI cancers. However, more evidence is needed to establish the likely impact of smoking cessation interventions amongst GI cancer patients...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195676/alcohol-smoking-and-the-risk-of-premalignant-and-malignant-colorectal-neoplasms
#5
REVIEW
Ifewumi O Fagunwa, Maurice B Loughrey, Helen G Coleman
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and has a complex aetiology consisting of environmental and genetic factors. In this review, we evaluate the roles of alcohol and tobacco smoking in colorectal neoplasia. Alcohol intake and tobacco smoking are associated with modest, but significantly, increased risks of CRC, adenomatous and serrated polyps. There is consistent evidence of dose-response relationships for both alcohol and smoking, and risk of these neoplasms. Alcohol and smoking appear to be more strongly associated with colorectal polyp than CRC development, suggesting roles in the initiation of neoplastic growths...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195675/the-role-of-smoking-and-alcohol-behaviour-in-the-management-of-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#6
REVIEW
Mais Khasawneh, Andrew D Spence, Jennifer Addley, Patrick B Allen
In the era of increasing use of immunosuppressive and biologic therapy for inflammatory bowel disease, environmental influences remain important independent risk factors to modify the course of the disease, affect the need for surgery and recurrence rates post-surgical resection. The effect of smoking on inflammatory bowel disease has been established over the decades, however the exact mechanism of how smoking affects remains as area of research. Alcohol is also among the socio-environmental factors which has been recognised to cause a flare of symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease patients...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195674/the-role-of-smoking-and-alcohol-behaviour-in-management-of-functional-gastrointestinal-disorders
#7
REVIEW
Bodil Ohlsson
Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common disorders in the population. Lifestyle habits have been suspected to influence the presence and degree of symptoms, and many studies have examined the role of food components and physical activity on the disease development. The role of smoking and alcohol intake on FGID has been less thoroughly examined. This systematic literature review, of a large amount of studies from different countries around the world with different design and application of FGID criteria, shows that smoking seems to be associated with a significant 50% increased risk of FD for current compared with never smokers...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195673/alcohol-smoking-and-the-liver-disease-patient
#8
REVIEW
Hannes Hagström
Alcohol is an established risk factor for cirrhosis. Current recommendations for a "safe" limit for alcohol consumption are usually set to around 30 g of alcohol per day for men and 20 g per day for women, but evidence is mounting that these cut-offs might be set too high. Also, inter-individual differences in the hepatic sensitivity for alcohol likely play into the risk of development of cirrhosis. In patients with concomitant liver diseases, a synergistic effect on fibrosis progression and high consumption of alcohol is evident...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195672/tobacco-and-alcohol-as-risk-factors-for-pancreatic-cancer
#9
REVIEW
Murray Korc, Christie Y Jeon, Mouad Edderkaoui, Stephen J Pandol, Maxim S Petrov
Pancreatic cancer is projected to become the leading cause of cancer deaths by 2050. The risk for pancreatic cancer may be reduced by up to 27% by modifying lifestyle risk factors, most notably tobacco smoking. Based on analysis of more than 2 million unselected individuals from general population, this article quantified the risk of pancreatic cancer in relation to lifelong tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption status, both alone and in combination. It also provided a state-of-the-art review of animal studies on the effect of tobacco smoke and alcohol on genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic precursor lesions, as well as the role of immune microenvironment in pancreatic carcinogenesis activated by tobacco and alcohol...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195671/alcohol-smoking-and-benign-hepato-biliary-disease
#10
REVIEW
Daniel Mønsted Shabanzadeh, Srdan Novovic
Gallstone disease and pancreatitis are the most frequent benign hepato-biliary causes of hospital admissions. Gallstone disease is prevalent, but symptomatic disease develops only in about one out of five carriers. Alcohol intake seems to protect gallstone formation in cohort studies possibly through effects on bile cholesterol metabolism, the enterohepatic circulation, and gallbladder function. The impact of smoking on gallstone formation seems minor. Both alcohol intake and smoking do not alter the clinical course of gallstone disease carriers...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195670/alcohol-smoking-and-risk-of-oesophago-gastric-cancer
#11
REVIEW
Jing Dong, Aaron P Thrift
Oesophago-gastric cancers (oesophageal and gastric cancers) are common, highly fatal cancers. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) are the two main histological subtypes of oesophageal cancer. Globally, OSCC remains the most common histological subtype of oesophageal cancer, with the highest burden occurring along two geographic belts, one from north central China through the central Asian republics to northern Iran, and one from eastern to southern Africa. In Western countries, the incidence of OAC has increased dramatically over the past 40 years...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195669/tobacco-smoking-alcohol-consumption-and-gastro-oesophageal-reflux-disease
#12
REVIEW
Eivind Ness-Jensen, Jesper Lagergren
Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195668/key-role-of-local-acetaldehyde-in-upper-gi-tract-carcinogenesis
#13
REVIEW
Mikko Salaspuro
Ethanol is neither genotoxic nor mutagenic. Its first metabolite acetaldehyde, however, is a powerful local carcinogen. Point mutation in ALDH2 gene proves the causal relationship between acetaldehyde and upper digestive tract cancer in humans. Salivary acetaldehyde concentration and exposure time are the two major and quantifiable factors regulating the degree of local acetaldehyde exposure in the ideal target organ, oropharynx. Instant microbial acetaldehyde formation from alcohol represents >70% of total ethanol associated acetaldehyde exposure in the mouth...
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29195667/alcohol-smoking-and-the-gi-tract
#14
EDITORIAL
Stephen McCain, Helen G Coleman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842058/distribution-of-colorectal-polyps-implications-for-screening
#15
REVIEW
Carlo Senore, Cristina Bellisario, Nereo Segnan
BACKGROUND: During the last decades data from different studies reported modifications of the topographic distribution of colorectal cancers (CRCs), with an increased frequency of tumours in proximal colonic segments. Given the documented link between adenomas and CRC, a proximal migration of adenomas over time could be expected as well. AIM: To evaluate available evidence about the prevalence of adenomas and of sessile serrated polyps across colonic segments, the changing trends in their distribution across the colon and the diagnostic performance of screening tests currently adopted in population based screening programs for lesions located in different colonic segments...
August 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842057/colorectal-endoscopic-submucosal-dissection-esd
#16
REVIEW
Lorenzo Fuccio, Thierry Ponchon
Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an interventional procedure for en-bloc resection of gastrointestinal lesions. ESD is a challenging and can involve a reasonable degree of risk, therefore case selection is of crucial importance, especially in the colo-rectum. This procedure should be mainly used for dissection of lesions when there is a high suspicion of superficial malignant invasion; several classifications have been proposed in order to better identify lesions suitable for ESD. However, case selection is still an issue, since only about 8-10% of dissected lesions are superficially invading cancer and most of cases involve benign or massively invading cancer...
August 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842056/colorectal-endoscopic-mucosal-resection-emr
#17
REVIEW
Pujan Kandel, Michael B Wallace
Colonoscopy has the benefit of detecting and treating precancerous adenomatous polyps and thus reduces mortality associated with CRC. Screening colonoscopy is the keystone for prevention of colorectal cancer. Over the last 20 years there has been increased in the management of large colorectal polyps from surgery to endoscopic removal techniques which is less invasive. Traditionally surgical resection was the treatment of choice for many years for larger polyps but colectomy poses significant morbidity of 14-46% and mortality of up to 7%...
August 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842055/standardisation-of-polypectomy-technique
#18
REVIEW
Alan Moss, Kumanan Nalankilli
There are several approaches to polypectomy for sessile polyps <20 mm and for pedunculated polyps. Recent evidence is leading towards standardisation of polypectomy technique. Key recent polypectomy developments include: 1. Use of cold snare polypectomy (CSP) for sessile polyps <10 mm; 2. Use of hot snare polypectomy (HSP) following submucosal injection for sessile polyps sized 10-19 mm; 3. Piecemeal cold snare polypectomy (PCSP), with or without prior submucosal injection, for select sessile polyps sized 10-19 mm, where the potential risk for an adverse event is increased (e...
August 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842054/adenoma-detection-rate-and-risk-of-colorectal-cancer
#19
REVIEW
P Wieszczy, J Regula, M F Kaminski
GOALS: The aim of this paper was to discuss association between adenoma detection rate (ADR) and interval colorectal cancer risk. BACKGROUND: Adenoma detection rate is being used as a benchmark quality measure for colonoscopy. There are three studies showing inverse association between ADR and interval colorectal cancer risk. One recent study reports significant impact of increased ADR on decreasing interval colorectal cancer risk. STUDY: We discussed evidence for using ADR as a quality measures in colonoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy...
August 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28842053/polyp-characterization-at-colonoscopy-clinical-implications
#20
REVIEW
James E Allen, Prateek Sharma
Although advancements in endoscopic imaging of colorectal mucosa have outstripped the pace of research in the field, the potential clinical applications of these novel technologies are promising. Chief among these is the ability to diagnose colorectal polyps in vivo. This feature appears most applicable to diminuitive polyps, which have very little malignant potential yet represent over 70% of resected polyps. In an ideal application, the capability to predict diminutive hyperplastic polyp histology in vivo precludes the need for excision whereas dimunitive adenomas do require excision, but not necessarily histopathologic analysis if the diagnosis is made in vivo with adequate confidence...
August 2017: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology
journal
journal
39738
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"