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Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28101830/getting-ahead-of-yourself-parafoveal-word-expectancy-modulates-the-n400-during-sentence-reading
#1
Mallory C Stites, Brennan R Payne, Kara D Federmeier
An important question in the reading literature regards the nature of the semantic information readers can extract from the parafovea (i.e., the next word in a sentence). Recent eye-tracking findings have found a semantic parafoveal preview benefit under many circumstances, and findings from event-related brain potentials (ERPs) also suggest that readers can at least detect semantic anomalies parafoveally (Barber, Van der Meij, & Kutas, Psychophysiology, 50(1), 48-59, 2013). We use ERPs to ask whether fine-grained aspects of semantic expectancy can affect the N400 elicited by a word appearing in the parafovea...
January 18, 2017: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097516/are-event-related-potentials-to-dynamic-facial-expressions-of-emotion-related-to-individual-differences-in-the-accuracy-of-processing-facial-expressions-and-identity
#2
Guillermo Recio, Oliver Wilhelm, Werner Sommer, Andrea Hildebrandt
Despite a wealth of knowledge about the neural mechanisms behind emotional facial expression processing, little is known about how they relate to individual differences in social cognition abilities. We studied individual differences in the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by dynamic facial expressions. First, we assessed the latent structure of the ERPs, reflecting structural face processing in the N170, and the allocation of processing resources and reflexive attention to emotionally salient stimuli, in the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive complex (LPC)...
January 17, 2017: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092055/differentiating-emotional-processing-and-attention-in-psychopathy-with-functional-neuroimaging
#3
Nathaniel E Anderson, Vaughn R Steele, J Michael Maurer, Vikram Rao, Michael R Koenigs, Jean Decety, David S Kosson, Vince D Calhoun, Kent A Kiehl
Individuals with psychopathy are often characterized by emotional processing deficits, and recent research has examined the specific contexts and cognitive mechanisms that underlie these abnormalities. Some evidence suggests that abnormal features of attention are fundamental to emotional deficits in persons with psychopathy, but few studies have demonstrated the neural underpinnings responsible for such effects. Here, we use functional neuroimaging to examine attention-emotion interactions among incarcerated individuals (n = 120) evaluated for psychopathic traits using the Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R)...
January 16, 2017: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050805/electrophysiological-correlates-reflect-the-integration-of-model-based-and-model-free-decision-information
#4
Ben Eppinger, Maik Walter, Shu-Chen Li
In this study, we investigated the interplay of habitual (model-free) and goal-directed (model-based) decision processes by using a two-stage Markov decision task in combination with event-related potentials (ERPs) and computational modeling. To manipulate the demands on model-based decision making, we applied two experimental conditions with different probabilities of transitioning from the first to the second stage of the task. As we expected, when the stage transitions were more predictable, participants showed greater model-based (planning) behavior...
January 3, 2017: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28050804/the-erp-signature-of-the-contextual-diversity-effect-in-visual-word-recognition
#5
Marta Vergara-Martínez, Montserrat Comesaña, Manuel Perea
Behavioral experiments have revealed that words appearing in many different contexts are responded to faster than words that appear in few contexts. Although this contextual diversity (CD) effect has been found to be stronger than the word-frequency (WF) effect, it is a matter of debate whether the facilitative effects of CD and WF reflect the same underlying mechanisms. The analysis of the electrophysiological correlates of CD may shed some light on this issue. This experiment is the first to examine the ERPs to high- and low-CD words when WF is controlled for...
January 3, 2017: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28035636/neuromodulation-can-reduce-aggressive-behavior-elicited-by-violent-video-games
#6
Paolo Riva, Alessandro Gabbiadini, Leonor J Romero Lauro, Luca Andrighetto, Chiara Volpato, Brad J Bushman
Research has shown that exposure to violent media increases aggression. However, the neural underpinnings of violent-media-related aggression are poorly understood. Additionally, few experiments have tested hypotheses concerning how to reduce violent-media-related aggression. In this experiment, we focused on a brain area involved in the regulation of aggressive impulses-the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC). We tested the hypothesis that brain polarization through anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over rVLPFC reduces aggression related to violent video games...
December 29, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28032303/neural-circuitry-of-emotion-regulation-effects-of-appraisal-attention-and-cortisol-administration
#7
Sean T Ma, James L Abelson, Go Okada, Stephan F Taylor, Israel Liberzon
Psychosocial well-being requires effective regulation of emotional responding in context of threat or stress. Neuroimaging studies have focused on instructed, volitional regulation (e.g., reappraisal or distancing), largely ignoring implicit regulation that does not involve purposeful effort to alter emotional experience. These implicit processes may or may not involve the same neural pathways as explicit regulatory strategies. We examined the neurobiology of implicit emotional regulation processes and the impact of the stress hormone cortisol on these processes...
December 28, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000083/impulsivity-in-rodents-with-a-genetic-predisposition-for-excessive-alcohol-consumption-is-associated-with-a-lack-of-a-prospective-strategy
#8
David N Linsenbardt, Michael P Smoker, Sarine S Janetsian-Fritz, Christopher C Lapish
Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that impulsive decision-making is a heritable risk factor for an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Clearly identifying a link between impulsivity and AUD risk, however, is complicated by the fact that both AUDs and impulsivity are heterogeneous constructs. Understanding the link between the two requires identifying the underlying cognitive factors that lead to impulsive choices. Rodent models have established that a family history of excessive drinking can lead to the expression of a transgenerational impulsive phenotype, suggesting heritable alterations in the decision-making process...
December 20, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28000082/the-influence-of-action-observation-on-action-execution-dissociating-the-contribution-of-action-on-perception-perception-on-action-and-resolving-conflict
#9
Eliane Deschrijver, Jan R Wiersema, Marcel Brass
For more than 15 years, motor interference paradigms have been used to investigate the influence of action observation on action execution. Most research on so-called automatic imitation has focused on variables that play a modulating role or investigated potential confounding factors. Interestingly, furthermore, a number of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have tried to shed light on the functional mechanisms and neural correlates involved in imitation inhibition. However, these fMRI studies, presumably due to poor temporal resolution, have primarily focused on high-level processes and have neglected the potential role of low-level motor and perceptual processes...
December 20, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27966102/behavioral-and-neural-correlates-of-disrupted-orienting-attention-in-posttraumatic-stress-disorder
#10
Stefanie Russman Block, Anthony P King, Rebecca K Sripada, Daniel H Weissman, Robert Welsh, Israel Liberzon
Prior work has revealed that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with altered (a) attentional performance and (b) resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in brain networks linked to attention. Here, we sought to characterize and link these behavioral and brain-based alterations in the context of Posner and Peterson's tripartite model of attention. Male military veterans with PTSD (N = 49; all deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan) and healthy age-and-gender-matched community controls (N = 26) completed the Attention Network Task...
December 13, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27957670/residual-effects-of-emotion-are-reflected-in-enhanced-visual-activity-after-sleep
#11
Kelly A Bennion, Jessica D Payne, Elizabeth A Kensinger
Research has investigated how sleep affects emotional memory and how emotion enhances visual processing, but these questions are typically asked by re-presenting an emotional stimulus at retrieval. For the first time, we investigate whether sleep affects neural activity during retrieval when the memory cue is a neutral context that was previously presented with either emotional or nonemotional content during encoding. Participants encoded scenes composed of a negative or neutral object on a neutral background either in the morning (preceding 12 hours awake; wake group) or evening (preceding 12 hours including a night of sleep; sleep group)...
December 12, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27943159/conditioned-task-set-competition-neural-mechanisms-of-emotional-interference-in-depression
#12
Aleks Stolicyn, J Douglas Steele, Peggy Seriès
Depression has been associated with increased response times at the incongruent-, neutral-, and negative-word trials of the classical and emotional Stroop tasks (Epp et al., Clinical Psychology Review, 32, 316-328, 2012). Response-time slowdown effects at incongruent- and negative-word trials of the Stroop tasks were reported to correlate with depressive severity, indicating strong relevance of the effects to the symptomatology. This study proposes a novel integrative computational model of neural mechanisms of both the classical and emotional Stroop effects, drawing on the previous prominent theoretical explanations of performance at the classical Stroop task (Cohen, Dunbar, & McClelland, Psychological Review, 97, 332-361, 1990; Herd, Banich, & O'Reilly, Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 18, 22-32, 2006), and in addition suggesting that negative emotional words represent conditioned stimuli for future negative outcomes...
December 9, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921217/don-t-make-me-angry-you-wouldn-t-like-me-when-i-m-angry-volitional-choices-to-act-or-inhibit-are-modulated-by-subliminal-perception-of-emotional-faces
#13
Jim Parkinson, Sarah Garfinkel, Hugo Critchley, Zoltan Dienes, Anil K Seth
Volitional action and self-control-feelings of acting according to one's own intentions and in being control of one's own actions-are fundamental aspects of human conscious experience. However, it is unknown whether high-level cognitive control mechanisms are affected by socially salient but nonconscious emotional cues. In this study, we manipulated free choice decisions to act or withhold an action by subliminally presenting emotional faces: In a novel version of the Go/NoGo paradigm, participants made speeded button-press responses to Go targets, withheld responses to NoGo targets, and made spontaneous, free choices to execute or withhold the response for Choice targets...
December 5, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921216/neural-correlates-of-rumination-in-adolescents-with-remitted-major-depressive-disorder-and-healthy-controls
#14
Katie L Burkhouse, Rachel H Jacobs, Amy T Peters, Olu Ajilore, Edward R Watkins, Scott A Langenecker
The aim of the present study was to use fMRI to examine the neural correlates of engaging in rumination among a sample of remitted depressed adolescents, a population at high risk for future depressive relapse. A rumination induction task was used to assess differences in the patterns of neural activation during rumination versus a distraction condition among 26 adolescents in remission from major depressive disorder (rMDD) and in 15 healthy control adolescents. Self-report depression and rumination, as well as clinician-rated depression, were also assessed among all participants...
December 5, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914042/perfectionism-mediated-the-relationship-between-brain-structure-variation-and-negative-emotion-in-a-nonclinical-sample
#15
Di Wu, Kangcheng Wang, Dongtao Wei, Qunlin Chen, Xue Du, Junyi Yang, Jiang Qiu
In maladaptive respects, perfectionism reflects an individual's concern over making mistakes and doubting the quality of his or her own actions excessively, which would affect one's emotion. However, little is known about the neural mechanisms associated with the perfectionism and negative affect. In this study, voxel-based morphometry was performed to identify the brain regions underlying individual differences in perfectionism, which was measured by the Chinese Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (CFMPS), in a large sample of nonclinical young adults...
December 2, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905082/facial-identity-and-emotional-expression-as-predictors-during-economic-decisions
#16
Sonia Alguacil, Eduardo Madrid, Antonio M Espín, María Ruz
Two sources of information most relevant to guide social decision making are the cooperative tendencies associated with different people and their facial emotional displays. This electrophysiological experiment aimed to study how the use of personal identity and emotional expressions as cues impacts different stages of face processing and their potential isolated or interactive processing. Participants played a modified trust game with 8 different alleged partners, and in separate blocks either the identity or the emotions carried information regarding potential trial outcomes (win or loss)...
November 30, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905081/parasympathetic-cardio-regulation-during-social-interactions-in-individuals-with-obesity-the-influence-of-negative-body-image
#17
Anne Schrimpf, Jana Kube, Jane Neumann, Annette Horstmann, Arno Villringer, Michael Gaebler
Individuals with obesity in Western societies often face weight-related stigmatization and social exclusion. Recurrent exposure to prejudice and negative social feedback alters one's behavior in future social interactions. In this study, we aimed to investigate autonomic nervous system and affective responses to social interactions in individuals with obesity. Women and men with (n = 56) and without (n = 56) obesity participated in episodes of social inclusion and social exclusion using a virtual ball-tossing game...
November 30, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905080/a-neural-model-of-normal-and-abnormal-learning-and-memory-consolidation-adaptively-timed-conditioning-hippocampus-amnesia-neurotrophins-and-consciousness
#18
Daniel J Franklin, Stephen Grossberg
How do the hippocampus and amygdala interact with thalamocortical systems to regulate cognitive and cognitive-emotional learning? Why do lesions of thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, and cortex have differential effects depending on the phase of learning when they occur? In particular, why is the hippocampus typically needed for trace conditioning, but not delay conditioning, and what do the exceptions reveal? Why do amygdala lesions made before or immediately after training decelerate conditioning while those made later do not? Why do thalamic or sensory cortical lesions degrade trace conditioning more than delay conditioning? Why do hippocampal lesions during trace conditioning experiments degrade recent but not temporally remote learning? Why do orbitofrontal cortical lesions degrade temporally remote but not recent or post-lesion learning? How is temporally graded amnesia caused by ablation of prefrontal cortex after memory consolidation? How are attention and consciousness linked during conditioning? How do neurotrophins, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), influence memory formation and consolidation? Is there a common output path for learned performance? A neural model proposes a unified answer to these questions that overcome problems of alternative memory models...
November 30, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896714/stopping-ability-in-younger-and-older-adults-behavioral-and-event-related-potential
#19
Shulan Hsieh, Yu-Chi Lin
This study examines age-related differences in inhibitory control as measured by stop-signal performance. The participants were 24 adults aged 20-30 years and 24 older adults aged 61-76 years. The task blocks were pure choice reaction-time blocks, global stop-signal blocks (with an auditory stop signal), and selective stop-signal blocks (with valid and invalid stop signals). There was a decline in reactive inhibitory control for the older group reflected by greater stop-signal reaction times and reduced P3 peak amplitudes in both global and selective stop-signal task blocks...
November 28, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27858329/saving-mental-effort-to-maintain-physical-effort-a-shift-of-activity-within-the-prefrontal-cortex-in-anticipation-of-prolonged-exercise
#20
Rémi Radel, Jeanick Brisswalter, Stéphane Perrey
Executive functioning and attention require mental effort. In line with the resource conservation principle, we hypothesized that mental effort would be saved when individuals expected to exercise for a long period. Twenty-two study participants exercised twice on a cycle ergometer for 10 min at 60% of their maximal aerobic power, with the expectation of exercising for either 10 min or 60 min. Changes in activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC) and right medial frontal cortex (rmPFC) were investigated by measuring oxyhemoglobin using near-infrared spectroscopy...
November 17, 2016: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
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