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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671547/health-system-transformation-through-a-scalable-actionable-innovation-strategy
#1
Anne Snowdon
The authors who contributed to this issue of Healthcare Papers have provided rich insights into a promising innovation agenda to support transformational change aimed at achieving high-performing, person-centric health systems that are sustainable and deliver value. First and foremost, the commentaries make clear that a focused innovation agenda with defined goals, objectives and milestones is needed, if innovation is to be a viable and successful strategy to achieve health system transformation. To date, innovation has been a catch-all term for solving the many challenges health systems are experiencing...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671546/key-conditions-for-successful-serial-entrepreneurship-in-healthcare
#2
Cameron Piron
As a serial entrepreneur in the medical device industry, the author embraces Snowdon's (2017) effort to create and stimulate dialogue among experts in health system innovation in an effort to define and support Canada's innovation agenda. In this paper, he outlines some of the attributes and skills that companies need to launch their products and scale their companies. He also identifies the main conditions of an innovation ecosystem that create the necessary infrastructure to enable and support highly successful companies while allowing them to accelerate their growth...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671545/creating-value-in-healthcare-the-need-for-innovative-solutions
#3
Dave Williams, Helena Hutton, Gary Ryan
The combined impact of an aging population's healthcare needs and the growing prevalence of chronic disease has, and will continue to have, a significant impact on healthcare capacity and economics. In the context of resource constraints there is a tendency to focus on doing more with less. However, the real opportunity may lie in building capacity by doing things differently. The authors propose a new paradigm for innovative hospital care and illustrate its potential by examining recent endeavours at a large, full-service hospital in Southern Ontario...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671544/the-drive-towards-sustainable-health-systems-needs-an-alignment-where-are-the-innovations-in-health-systems-planning
#4
Gail Tomblin Murphy, Stephen Birch, Adrian MacKenzie, Janet Rigby, Mary Ellen Purkis
Clarifying the healthcare innovation agenda is critical in order to advance the impact of system innovations. As part of this agenda-setting it is important to address the four conditions within which innovations can enhance system sustainability: 1) the innovation agenda reflects and is aligned with healthcare objectives and policy; 2) planning methodologies for services, workforce and funding are aligned with healthcare objectives and policy; 3) innovations in services are accommodated in systems through innovations in policy, planning and funding; and 4) innovations are systematically monitored and evaluated...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671543/quality-and-innovation-redesigning-a-coordinated-and-connected-health-system
#5
Peter W Vaughan
Nova Scotia's consolidated health system was launched on April 1, 2015. This new approach to organizing health administration and services in the province arose out of necessity. When planning began, Nova Scotia was spending 41% of its annual budget on health services. In comparison to other provinces and territories, our per capita health-related spending was among the highest in the country, we had one of Canada's oldest populations and we had some of the worst health outcomes. Clearly, we could not continue to do the same things and expect different results...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671542/transforming-healthcare-through-technology
#6
Richard Barker, Tara Donnelly
In this commentary, we outline the necessity of change in the way we run healthcare systems due to a range of factors, common across the globe, and assert that transformational technology is an important tool for change. We propose that there are seven imperatives to pursue and that emerging evidence from digital health solutions could become an important part of achieving each of them. We provide examples of some of the technologies that respond to each issue we identify, and reference some programs designed to support the acceleration of use of these technologies across the UK's National Health Service...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671541/shifting-paradigms-in-canadian-healthcare-to-support-the-scale-and-spread-of-innovation
#7
Sarah Padfield
Health systems and healthcare organizations across Canada have identified the need for innovation to transform healthcare by creating the conditions for successful, scalable and impactful system transformation. Meeting these goals requires adopting new leadership paradigms to shape and design policy frameworks, business models, technical structures and funding approaches. In order to scale innovation and achieve system-wide impact, system leaders will need to create a culture that supports innovation and transformational change...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671540/health-system-innovation-lessons-from-tobacco-control
#8
John Garcia
Comprehensive tobacco control is considered by many to be a model for effective population health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Its history holds lessons for the "scalable, actionable, innovation agenda" called for by Anne Snowdon (2017). This commentary discusses lessons from tobacco control related to: changing practices in response to evolving paradigms and scientific evidence; international best practices; the importance of a broadly-accepted, shared vision about elements of an effective strategy; scientific and public service leadership; social actors leading change through advocacy, policy and the media; organizational learning mechanisms and capacity building systems; and, the importance of a continuously renewing, forward-looking agenda...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671539/a-blueprint-for-innovation-to-achieve-health-system-transformation
#9
Anne W Snowdon
Global health systems are challenged by escalating costs and growing demands for care created by the demands of aging populations and rising rates of chronic illness which place unsustainable pressure on health systems to meet population health needs. To overcome these challenges, transformational change is needed to strengthen health system performance and sustainability. Innovation is widely viewed as the strategy to drive transformational change in health systems; yet to date, innovation has lacked a clearly defined focus or agenda to achieve transformation...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28671538/getting-to-now-the-challenge-of-stimulating-innovation-in-complex-systems
#10
Adalsteinn D Brown, William Charnetski
In this issue of Healthcare Papers, Anne Snowdon clearly articulates the elements necessary for a health system innovation agenda. Although these steps are not easy - witness the slow progress of the adoption and diffusion of innovation across Canadian healthcare - they are relatively simple and provide a nice counterpoint to our usual concerns about how to effect change within the complex environment of healthcare. The commentators in this issue re-enforce the importance of particular elements or the feasibility of taking some of the first hard steps...
2017: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734791/lost-in-maps-regionalization-and-indigenous-health-services
#11
Josée G Lavoie, Derek Kornelsen, Yvonne Boyer, Lloy Wylie
The settlement of the land now known as Canada meant the erasure - sometimes from ignorance, often purposeful - of Indigenous place-names, and understandings of territory and associated obligations. The Canadian map with its three territories and ten provinces, electoral boundaries and districts, reflects boundaries that continue to fragment Indigenous nations and traditional lands. Each fragment adds institutional requirements and organizational complexities that Indigenous nations must engage with when attempting to realize the benefits taken for granted under the Canadian social contract...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734790/the-politics-of-regionalization
#12
Katherine Fierlbeck
Regardless of their policy outcomes, strategies of regionalization are prevalent because they are politically useful. They permit governments to be seen addressing serious systemic problems in the healthcare system without fundamentally upsetting the face-to-face relationship between physicians and patients. They shift the responsibility for unpopular policies, including the consolidation of services, away from provincial governments. They can be part of a larger process of decentralizing power that is undertaken for larger, non-health-related reasons...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734789/regionalization-as-one-manifestation-of-the-pursuit-of-the-holy-grail
#13
Stephen Duckett
Regionalization has strengths and weaknesses. The balance of the two will vary over time, differing in different contexts and with different implementations. Alberta's implementation of a centralized structure had some strengths: economies of scale and expertise; opportunities for province-wide learning; internalization of geographic politics; and improved geographic equity. It also had weaknesses: diseconomies of scale, remoteness from communities and politicization. In any implementation of regionalization, policy makers should attempt to realize the benefits of alternative paths not travelled and minimise the weaknesses of the chosen structure...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734788/transforming-regions-into-high-performing-health-systems-toward-the-triple-aim-of-better-health-better-care-and-better-value-for-canadians
#14
Yves Bergevin, Bettina Habib, Keesa Elicksen-Jensen, Stephen Samis, Jean Rochon, Jean-Louis Denis, Denis Roy
A study on the impact of regionalization on the Triple Aim of Better Health, Better Care and Better Value across Canada in 2015 identified major findings including: (a) with regard to the Triple Aim, the Canadian situation is better than before but variable and partial, and Canada continues to underperform compared with other industrialized countries, especially in primary healthcare where it matters most; (b) provinces are converging toward a two-level health system (provincial/regional); (c) optimal size of regions is probably around 350,000-500,000 population; d) citizen and physician engagement remains weak...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734787/health-system-regionalization-the-new-zealand-experience
#15
Tim Tenbensel
New Zealand's health system has many similarities with Canada, and also has longstanding experience with regionalization of healthcare services. Since 2001, the most important change has been the development of regional primary healthcare organizations funded according to population characteristics. This significant change has created the potential for a more integrated health system. However, barriers remain in realizing this potential. The key challenges include dealing with inter-organizational complexity and finding the right balance between hierarchical and collaborative relationships between the state and non-government providers...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734786/regionalization-lessons-from-denmark
#16
Karsten Vrangbaek
Denmark is a small Northern European country with an extensive welfare state and a strong commitment to maintaining a universal healthcare system. Like the other countries in the Nordic region, Denmark has a long tradition of democratically governed local and regional governments with extensive responsibilities in organizing welfare state services. The Danish healthcare system has demonstrated an ability to increase productivity, while at the same time maintaining a high level of patient satisfaction. Ongoing reforms have contributed to these results, as well as a firm commitment to innovation and coordination...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734785/what-can-we-learn-from-the-uk-s-natural-experiments-of-the-benefits-of-regions
#17
Gwyn Bevan
Marchildon highlights the lack of evidence on policies of regionalization in Canada: with regionalization being in favour in the 2000s followed by disillusion and the abolition of regions by some provincial governments. This paper looks at evidence from the UK's single-payer system of the impacts of regions on the performance of the delivery of healthcare. In England, regions were an important part of the hierarchical structure of the National Health Service (NHS) from its beginning, in 1948, to the introduction of provider competition, in the 1990s...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734784/regionalization-what-have-we-learned
#18
Gregory P Marchildon
Regionalization is arguably the most significant health reform in Canada since medicare. Although a majority of provinces continue to have regionalized systems in Canada, the policy is more contested today than it was a decade ago. Since Ontario's implementation of local health integration networks (LHINs) in 2006 and Alberta's elimination of regional health authorities (RHAs) in favour of Alberta Health Services in 2008, Canada has had differing approaches to regionalization. However, due to the centralization of physician budgets in provincial health ministries, primary care has not been integrated into any regionalization model in Canada...
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734783/regionalization-does-not-equal-integration
#19
Adalsteinn D Brown, Peter W T Pisters, C David Naylor
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: HealthcarePapers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27230720/recognizing-the-magnitude-of-the-challenge
#20
Stephen Frank
"Funding Long-Term Care in Canada: Issues And Options" (Adams and Vanin 2016) is a well-argued paper that grounds its recommendations in learnings from other jurisdictions that have tried to enact major reforms to the funding approach for long-term care (LTC). In particular, the paper considers the experience in both the UK and Quebec. The paper correctly highlights the significant difficulty of implementing large structural reforms to deal with LTC funding challenges. This is not a surprising result. Structural reform in healthcare has proven challenging even when the problems being addressed are immediate and large in scale, let alone for those that will manifest themselves in increments over many years or even decades in the future...
2016: HealthcarePapers
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