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Medical Humanities

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29305390/blind-alleys-and-dead-ends-researching-innovation-in-late-20th-century-surgery
#1
Harriet Palfreyman, Roger L Kneebone
This article examines the fortunes of one particular surgical innovation in the treatment of gallstones in the late 20th century; the percutaneous cholecystolithotomy (PCCL). This was an experimental procedure which was trialled and developed in the early days of minimally invasive surgery and one which fairly rapidly fell out of favour. Using diverse research methods from textual analysis to oral history to re-enactment, the authors explore the rise and fall of the PCCL demonstrating that such apparent failures are as crucial a part of innovation histories as the triumphs and have much light to shed on the development of surgery more generally...
January 5, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29305389/before-narrative-episodic-reading-and-representations-of-chronic-pain
#2
Sara Wasson
This article suggests that some illness experience may require a reading practice less concerned with narrative coherence or self-authorship, and more interested in the value of textual fragments, episodes and moments considered outside a narrative framework. Chronic pain can pose multiple challenges to the narrative orientations celebrated in both 'survivorship' discourse and classic medical humanities scholarship. In its recalcitrance to cure, its often mysterious aetiology and its complex blend of somatic, interpersonal and affective elements, representations of chronic pain can require a richer vocabulary of temporality...
January 5, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175882/evidence-and-speculation-reimagining-approaches-to-architecture-and-research-within-the-paediatric-hospital
#3
Rebecca McLaughlan, Alan Pert
As the dominant research paradigm within the construction of contemporary healthcare facilities, evidence-based design (EBD) will increasingly impact our expectations of what hospital architecture should be. Research methods within EBD focus on prototyping incremental advances and evaluating what has already been built. Yet medical care is a rapidly evolving system; changes to technology, workforce composition, patient demographics and funding models can create rapid and unpredictable changes to medical practice and modes of care...
November 25, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175881/sing-your-heart-out-community-singing-as-part-of-mental-health-recovery
#4
Tom Shakespeare, Alice Whieldon
This paper reports on a qualitative evaluation of a Norfolk-based network of community singing workshops aimed at people with mental health conditions and the general public. The aims of the study were (a) to evaluate the effectiveness of the Sing Your Heart Out (SYHO) project and (b) to identify the key features which made the project distinctive. The study draws on 20 interviews with participants, two focus groups with organisers and workshop leaders, and participative observation over a 6-month period. Interviewees all reported improvement in or maintenance of their mental health and well-being as a direct result of engagement in the singing workshops...
November 25, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29196432/shame-stigma-and-medicine
#5
Barry Lyons, Luna Dolezal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29196431/editor-s-note-shame-stigma-and-medicine
#6
EDITORIAL
Brandy Schillace
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29079608/vulnerability-survival-and-shame-in-nina-raine-s-tiger-country
#7
Deborah Bowman
Shame in healthcare remains relatively underexplored, yet it is commonplace and its impact is significant. This paper explores shame in healthcare using Nina Raine's 2011 play Tiger Country Three manifestations of shame are explored, namely (1) shame in relation to professional identity and survival in the clinical workplace; (2) shame and illness as experienced by both patients and doctors; and (3) the systemic and organisational influences on shame within healthcare systems. I suggest that the theatre is particularly well-placed to elucidate shame, and that Tiger Country demonstrates the prevalence and impact of shame on clinical work...
December 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29030410/shame-and-the-vulnerable-self-in-medical-contexts-the-compassionate-solution
#8
Paul Gilbert
Shame is a powerful experience that plays a vital role in a whole range of aspects of the clinical encounter. Shame experiences can have an impact on our psychological and physiological state and on how we experience ourselves, others and our relationships. The medical encounter is an obvious arena for shame because we are presenting (aspects of) our bodies and minds that can be seen as unattractive and undesirable, diseased, decayed and injured with the various excretions that typically might invite disgust...
October 13, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28993427/fate-and-the-clinic-a-multidisciplinary-consideration-of-fatalism-in-health-behaviour
#9
Angela Ross Perfetti
The role of fatalism in health behaviour has stirred significant controversy in literature across several disciplines. Some researchers have demonstrated a negative correlation between fatalistic beliefs and healthy behaviours such as cancer screening, arguing that fatalism is a barrier to health-seeking behaviours. Other studies have painted a more complicated picture of fatalistic beliefs and health behaviours that ultimately questions fatalism's causality as a distinct factor. Unpacking this debate raises thought-provoking questions about how epistemological and methodological frameworks present particular pictures about the connections between belief, race, class and behaviour...
October 9, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28972037/messy-entanglements-research-assemblages-in-heart-transplantation-discourses-and-practices
#10
Margrit Shildrick, Andrew Carnie, Alexa Wright, Patricia McKeever, Emily Huan-Ching Jan, Enza De Luca, Ingrid Bachmann, Susan Abbey, Dana Dal Bo, Jennifer Poole, Tammer El-Sheikh, Heather Ross
The paper engages with a variety of data around a supposedly single biomedical event, that of heart transplantation. In conventional discourse, organ transplantation constitutes an unproblematised form of spare part surgery in which failing biological components are replaced by more efficient and enduring ones, but once that simple picture is complicated by employing a radically interdisciplinary approach, any biomedical certainty is profoundly disrupted. Our aim, as a cross-sectorial partnership, has been to explore the complexities of heart transplantation by explicitly entangling research from the arts, biosciences and humanities without privileging any one discourse...
September 28, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935631/cultural-crossings-of-care-an-appeal-to-the-medical-humanities
#11
Julia Kristeva, Marie Rose Moro, John Ødemark, Eivind Engebretsen
Modern medicine is confronted with cultural crossings in various forms. In facing these challenges, it is not enough to simply increase our insight into the cultural dimensions of health and well-being. We must, more radically, question the conventional distinction between the 'objectivity of science' and the 'subjectivity of culture'. This obligation creates an urgent call for the medical humanities but also for a fundamental rethinking of their grounding assumptions.Julia Kristeva (JK) has problematised the biomedical concept of health through her reading of the anthropogony of Cura (Care), who according to the Roman myth created man out of a piece of clay...
September 21, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28912383/physiotherapists-as-detectives-investigating-clues-and-plots-in-the-clinical-encounter
#12
Birgitte Ahlsen, Anne Marit Mengshoel, Hilde Bondevik, Eivind Engebretsen
This article investigates the clinical reasoning process of physiotherapists working with patients with chronic muscle pain. The article demonstrates how physiotherapists work with clues and weigh up different plots as they seek to build consistent stories about their patient's illness. The material consists of interviews with 10 Norwegian physiotherapists performed after the first clinical encounter with a patient. Using a narrative approach and Lonergan's theory of interpretation, the study highlights how, like detectives, the therapists work with clues by asking a number of interpretive questions of their data...
September 14, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28887329/the-abdication-of-king-edward-viii-a-study-of-estrangement-between-an-adult-son-and-elderly-mother
#13
Robert C Abrams
In this article the Abdication of King Edward VIII of Great Britain and his estrangement from the dowager Queen Mary are reconsidered as prototypes of intergenerational conflict arising from a collision of values between an adult child and an elderly mother. Historical materials on the Abdication and other respected secondary sources, including biographies of key individuals, were consulted, and the limited sociological and clinical literature on estrangement between elderly parents and adult children was referenced...
September 8, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28883022/a-visit-to-brookwood-aslyum-in-the-19th-century
#14
Charlotte Cliffe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 7, 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28855380/the-ghost-of-pandemics-past-revisiting-two-centuries-of-influenza-in-sweden
#15
Martin Holmberg
Previous influenza pandemics are usually invoked in pandemic preparedness planning without a thorough analysis of the events surrounding them, what has been called the 'configuration' of epidemics. Historic pandemics are instead used to contrast them to the novelty of the coming imagined plague or as fear of a ghost-like repetition of the past. This view of pandemics is guided by a biomedical framework that is ahistorical and reductionist. The meaning of 'pandemic' influenza is in fact highly ambiguous in its partitioning of pandemic and seasonal influenza...
September 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28855379/new-way-of-seeing
#16
EDITORIAL
Brandy Schillace
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739587/tonio-telling-time
#17
Ron Louie, Ron Louie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28465320/handsome-cat
#18
Kevin Dueck
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28450412/the-art-of-medicine-arts-based-training-in-observation-and-mindfulness-for-fostering-the-empathic-response-in-medical-residents
#19
Joyce Zazulak, May Sanaee, Andrea Frolic, Nicole Knibb, Eve Tesluk, Edward Hughes, Lawrence E M Grierson
Empathy is an essential attribute for medical professionals. Yet, evidence indicates that medical learners' empathy levels decline dramatically during medical school. Training in evidence-based observation and mindfulness has the potential to bolster the acquisition and demonstration of empathic behaviours for medical learners. In this prospective cohort study, we explore the impact of a course in arts-based visual literacy and mindfulness practice (Art of Seeing) on the empathic response of medical residents engaged in obstetrics and gynaecology and family medicine training...
September 2017: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28823994/arts-based-interventions-in-healthcare-education
#20
Magda Osman, Bella Eacott, Suzy Willson
Healthcare education institutions are increasingly including arts-based interventions in their programmes. We analysed 62 studies of arts-based interventions to understand how these interventions may be beneficial, and why providing evidence continues to be a challenge for the field.Our analysis highlighted two issues. We found that 79% of the included studies reported that their interventions were successful, but without always defining this success or how it was measured. This lack of clarity was apparent in descriptions of both what arts-based interventions aimed to do, and in descriptions of how they might do this...
August 19, 2017: Medical Humanities
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