journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Medical Humanities

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724778/pain-as-performance-re-virginisation-in-turkey
#1
Hande Güzel
The literature on pain has so far been primarily interested in chronic pain, medically induced pain and pain as an unwanted experience. However, pain is a more complicated experience and the lines between pain and pleasure are blurred in different contexts. In this paper, these lines are explored within the context of re-virginisation in Turkey by taking to its centre the meanings attached to pain through women's online and offline narratives. Re-virginisation refers to the process women undergo in order to reclaim their virginity due to the expectation that women should be virgins at the time of marriage and to the persistence of the myth that virginity can and should be proved via bleeding during or right after sexual intercourse...
May 3, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29720481/sensing-space-and-making-place-the-hospital-and-therapeutic-landscapes-in-two-cancer-narratives
#2
Victoria Bates
This article explores the role of senses in the construction and experience of place, focusing on patients' experiences of hospital care. It compares two cancer narratives for their insights into the heterogeneous ways that hospital environments are made into therapeutic landscapes, arguing that they are a product of dynamic processes rather than something that is simply built. The article draws on a relational model of space and place, alongside literary analysis, to explore the making of un/healthy environments in embodied, affective and sensory terms...
May 2, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29680807/fiction-reading-for-good-or-ill-eating-disorders-interpretation-and-the-case-for-creative-bibliotherapy-research
#3
Emily T Troscianko
Compared with self-help bibliotherapy, little is known about the efficacy of creative bibliotherapy or the mechanisms of its possible efficacy for eating disorders or any other mental health condition. It is clear, however, that fiction is widely used informally as a therapeutic or antitherapeutic tool and that it has considerable potential in both directions, with a possibly significant distinction between the effects of reading fiction about eating disorders (which may-contrary to theoretical predictions-be broadly negative in effect) or one's preferred genre of other fiction (which may be broadly positive)...
April 21, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29669800/-optimal-relief-for-pain-at-the-end-of-life-a-caregiver-s-tale
#4
David B Morris
The current opioid crisis-driven partly by medical overprescription and partly by illegal drug abuse-is a significant cultural and professional dilemma in the USA and elsewhere. It has produced a strong reaction in favour of restricting medical use of opioids for pain, especially chronic pain. The author for a quarter century has written about pain from a biocultural perspective, and in this essay-based on his experience as primary caregiver for his late wife-he approaches the question of appropriate opioid use at the end of life...
April 18, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29602876/supple-bodies-healthy-minds-yoga-psychedelics-and-american-mental-health
#5
Lucas Richert, Matthew DeCloedt
Much discussion about mental health has revolved around treatment models. As interdisciplinary scholarship has shown, mental health knowledge, far from being a neutral product detached from the society that generated it, was shaped by politics, economics and culture. By drawing on case studies of yoga, religion and fitness, this article will examine the ways in which mental health practices-sometimes scientific, sometimes spiritual-have been conceived, debated and applied by researchers and the public. More specifically, it will interrogate the relationship between yoga, psychedelics, South Asian and Eastern religion (as understood and practiced in the USA) and mental health...
March 30, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29563256/women-madness-and-exercise
#6
Jennifer Jane Hardes
The positive relationship between exercise and mental health is often taken for granted in today's society, despite the lack of academic literature evidencing this symbiosis. Gender is considered a significant determinant in a number of mental health diagnoses. Indeed, women are considered twice as likely as men to experience the most pervasive mental health condition, depression. Exercise for women's mental health is promoted through various macrolevel charity, as well as microlevel, campaigns that influence government healthcare policy and National Health Service guidelines...
March 21, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29472316/border-crossings-joining-a-multidisciplinary-conversation-about-medical-humanities
#7
EDITORIAL
Brandy Schillace
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28993427/fate-and-the-clinic-a-multidisciplinary-consideration-of-fatalism-in-health-behaviour
#8
Angela Ross Perfetti
The role of fatalism in health behaviour has stirred significant controversy in literature across several disciplines. Some researchers have demonstrated a negative correlation between fatalistic beliefs and healthy behaviours such as cancer screening, arguing that fatalism is a barrier to health-seeking behaviours. Other studies have painted a more complicated picture of fatalistic beliefs and health behaviours that ultimately questions fatalism's causality as a distinct factor. Unpacking this debate raises thought-provoking questions about how epistemological and methodological frameworks present particular pictures about the connections between belief, race, class and behaviour...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28972037/messy-entanglements-research-assemblages-in-heart-transplantation-discourses-and-practices
#9
Margrit Shildrick, Andrew Carnie, Alexa Wright, Patricia McKeever, Emily Huan-Ching Jan, Enza De Luca, Ingrid Bachmann, Susan Abbey, Dana Dal Bo, Jennifer Poole, Tammer El-Sheikh, Heather Ross
The paper engages with a variety of data around a supposedly single biomedical event, that of heart transplantation. In conventional discourse, organ transplantation constitutes an unproblematised form of spare part surgery in which failing biological components are replaced by more efficient and enduring ones, but once that simple picture is complicated by employing a radically interdisciplinary approach, any biomedical certainty is profoundly disrupted. Our aim, as a cross-sectorial partnership, has been to explore the complexities of heart transplantation by explicitly entangling research from the arts, biosciences and humanities without privileging any one discourse...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935631/cultural-crossings-of-care-an-appeal-to-the-medical-humanities
#10
Julia Kristeva, Marie Rose Moro, John Ødemark, Eivind Engebretsen
Modern medicine is confronted with cultural crossings in various forms. In facing these challenges, it is not enough to simply increase our insight into the cultural dimensions of health and well-being. We must, more radically, question the conventional distinction between the 'objectivity of science' and the 'subjectivity of culture'. This obligation creates an urgent call for the medical humanities but also for a fundamental rethinking of their grounding assumptions.Julia Kristeva (JK) has problematised the biomedical concept of health through her reading of the anthropogony of Cura (Care), who according to the Roman myth created man out of a piece of clay...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28912383/physiotherapists-as-detectives-investigating-clues-and-plots-in-the-clinical-encounter
#11
Birgitte Ahlsen, Anne Marit Mengshoel, Hilde Bondevik, Eivind Engebretsen
This article investigates the clinical reasoning process of physiotherapists working with patients with chronic muscle pain. The article demonstrates how physiotherapists work with clues and weigh up different plots as they seek to build consistent stories about their patient's illness. The material consists of interviews with 10 Norwegian physiotherapists performed after the first clinical encounter with a patient. Using a narrative approach and Lonergan's theory of interpretation, the study highlights how, like detectives, the therapists work with clues by asking a number of interpretive questions of their data...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28887329/the-abdication-of-king-edward-viii-a-study-of-estrangement-between-an-adult-son-and-elderly-mother
#12
Robert C Abrams
In this article the Abdication of King Edward VIII of Great Britain and his estrangement from the dowager Queen Mary are reconsidered as prototypes of intergenerational conflict arising from a collision of values between an adult child and an elderly mother. Historical materials on the Abdication and other respected secondary sources, including biographies of key individuals, were consulted, and the limited sociological and clinical literature on estrangement between elderly parents and adult children was referenced...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28823994/arts-based-interventions-in-healthcare-education
#13
Magda Osman, Bella Eacott, Suzy Willson
Healthcare education institutions are increasingly including arts-based interventions in their programmes. We analysed 62 studies of arts-based interventions to understand how these interventions may be beneficial, and why providing evidence continues to be a challenge for the field.Our analysis highlighted two issues. We found that 79% of the included studies reported that their interventions were successful, but without always defining this success or how it was measured. This lack of clarity was apparent in descriptions of both what arts-based interventions aimed to do, and in descriptions of how they might do this...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756412/heartfelt-images-learning-cardiac-science-artistically
#14
Carol Ann Courneya
There are limited curricular options for medical students to engage in art-making during their training. Yet, it is known that art-making confers a variety of benefits related to learning. This qualitative study utilises a visual methodology to explore students' art-making in the context of the cardiovascular sciences. The existence of a multiyear repository of medical/dental student generated, cardiac-inspired art, collected over 6 years, provided the opportunity to explore the nature of the art made. The aim was to categorise the art produced, as well as the depth and breadth of understanding required to produce the art...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28689196/love-as-delusion-delusions-of-love-erotomania-narcissism-and-shame
#15
Brendan D Kelly
Erotomania has a long, colourful history in psychiatry. It is a rare condition in which the patient ('subject') develops the belief that he or she is loved from afar by another person ('object'). The subject is generally female, though men predominate in forensic samples. The object is generally perceived to belong to a higher social class, reflecting a sociopolitical element in the construction of love. Erotomania requires active treatment and risk management as it can be associated with stalking and other offending behaviour...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630374/classifying-the-body-in-marlene-dumas-the-image-as-burden
#16
Anthea Gordon
Medical photography, and in particular dermatological imagery, is often assumed to provide an objective, and functional, representation of disease and that it can act as a diagnostic aid. By contrast, artistic conceptions of the images of the body tend to focus on interpretative heterogeneity and ambiguity, aiming to create or explore meaning rather than enact a particular function. In her 2015 retrospective exhibition at the Tate Modern, South African artist Marlene Dumas questions these disciplinary divides by using medical imagery (among other photographic sources) as the basis for her portraits...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495908/towards-cultural-materialism-in-the-medical-humanities-the-case-of-blood-rejuvenation
#17
Catherine Oakley
This paper argues for an approach within the medical humanities that draws on the theoretical legacy of cultural materialism as a framework for reading cultural practices and their relationship to the social and economic order. It revisits the origins and development of cultural materialism in cultural studies and literary studies between the 1970s and 1990s and considers how, with adaptation, this methodology might facilitate ideological criticism focused on material formations of health, disease and the human body...
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27288250/a-grieving-process-illustrated
#18
Rory Hutchinson
The sudden death of Pablo Picasso's closest friend Carlos Casagemas in 1901 came as a great shock to the young Picasso. From a young age, Picasso had ruminated on life and death; however, this was his first experience of bereavement. Following the death of Casagemas, Picasso's paintings can be seen as a diary of his grieving process and clearly illustrate the five stages of the grieving process as outlined by Kubler-Ross in ' On Death and Dying ' (1969).
March 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29440385/a-moment-for-compassion-emerging-rhetorics-in-end-of-life-care
#19
Shahaduz Zaman, Alexander Whitelaw, Naomi Richards, Hamilton Inbadas, David Clark
Compassion is an emotional response to the suffering of others. Once felt, it entails subsequent action to ameliorate their suffering. Recently, 'compassion' has become the flagship concept to be fostered in the delivery of end-of-life care, and a rallying call for social action and public health intervention. In this paper, we examine the emerging rhetorics of compassion as they relate to end-of-life care and offer a critique of the expanding discourse around it. We argue that, even where individuals 'possess' compassion or are 'trained' in it, there are difficulties for compassion to flow freely, particularly within Western society...
February 10, 2018: Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29439086/using-photography-to-enhance-gp-trainees-reflective-practice-and-professional-development
#20
Rutherford, Emer Forde, Jacqueline Priego-Hernandez, Aurelia Butcher, Clare Wedderburn
The capacity and the commitment to reflect are integral to the practice of medicine and are core components of most general practitioners (GP) training programmes. Teaching through the humanities is a growing area within medical education, but one which is often considered a voluntary 'add-on' for the interested doctor. This article describes an evaluation of a highly innovative pedagogical project which used photography as a means to enhance GP trainees' reflective capacity, self-awareness and professional development...
February 8, 2018: Medical Humanities
journal
journal
35099
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"