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Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29181615/right-ear-advantage-for-speech-in-noise-recognition-in-patients-with-nonlateralized-tinnitus-and-normal-hearing-sensitivity
#1
Yihsin Tai, Fatima T Husain
Despite having normal hearing sensitivity, patients with chronic tinnitus may experience more difficulty recognizing speech in adverse listening conditions as compared to controls. However, the association between the characteristics of tinnitus (severity and loudness) and speech recognition remains unclear. In this study, the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN) was conducted monaurally on 14 patients with bilateral tinnitus and 14 age- and hearing-matched adults to determine the relation between tinnitus characteristics and speech understanding...
November 27, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29134476/aminoglycoside-damage-and-hair-cell-regeneration-in-the-chicken-utricle
#2
Mirko Scheibinger, Daniel C Ellwanger, C Eduardo Corrales, Jennifer S Stone, Stefan Heller
In this study, we present a systematic characterization of hair cell loss and regeneration in the chicken utricle in vivo. A single unilateral surgical delivery of streptomycin caused robust decline of hair cell numbers in striolar as well as extrastriolar regions, which in the striola was detected very early, 6 h post-insult. During the initial 12 h of damage response, we observed global repression of DNA replication, in contrast to the natural, mitotic hair cell production in undamaged control utricles...
November 13, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29134475/synchronized-spontaneous-otoacoustic-emissions-provide-a-signal-to-noise-ratio-advantage-in-medial-olivocochlear-reflex-assays
#3
James D Lewis
Detection of medial olivocochlear-induced (MOC) changes to transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) requires high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). TEOAEs associated with synchronized spontaneous (SS) OAEs exhibit higher SNRs than TEOAEs in the absence of SSOAEs, potentially making the former well suited for MOC assays. Although SSOAEs may complicate interpretation of MOC-induced changes to TEOAE latency, recent work suggests SSOAEs are not a problem in non-latency-dependent MOC assays. The current work examined the potential benefit of SSOAEs in TEOAE-based assays of the MOC efferents...
November 13, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29110135/the-effect-of-visual-contrast-on-human-vestibulo-ocular-reflex-adaptation
#4
M Muntaseer Mahfuz, Michael C Schubert, Christopher J Todd, William V C Figtree, Serajul I Khan, Americo A Migliaccio
The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is the main retinal image stabilising mechanism during rapid head movement. When the VOR does not stabilise the world or target image on the retina, retinal image slip occurs generating an error signal that drives the VOR response to increase or decrease until image slip is minimised, i.e. VOR adaptation occurs. Visual target contrast affects the human smooth pursuit and optokinetic reflex responses. We sought to determine if contrast also affected VOR adaptation. We tested 12 normal subjects, each over 16 separate sessions...
November 6, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29086155/evaluating-multipulse-integration-as-a-neural-health-correlate-in-human-cochlear-implant-users-effects-of-stimulation-mode
#5
Ning Zhou, Lixue Dong, Mingqi Hang
Previous psychophysical studies have shown that a steep detection-threshold-versus-stimulation-rate function (multipulse integration; MPI) is associated with laterally positioned electrodes producing a broad neural excitation pattern. These findings are consistent with steep MPI depending on either a certain width of neural excitation allowing a large population of neurons operating at a low point on their dynamic range to respond to an increase in stimulation rate or a certain slope of excitation pattern that allows recruitment of neurons at the excitation periphery...
October 30, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29047013/behavioral-animal-model-of-the-emotional-response-to-tinnitus-and-hearing-loss
#6
Amanda M Lauer, Gail Larkin, Aikeen Jones, Bradford J May
Increased prevalence of emotional distress is associated with tinnitus and hearing loss. The underlying mechanisms of the negative emotional response to tinnitus and hearing loss remain poorly understood, and it is challenging to disentangle the emotional consequences of hearing loss from those specific to tinnitus in listeners experiencing both. We addressed these questions in laboratory rats using three common rodent anxiety screening assays: elevated plus maze, open field test, and social interaction test...
October 18, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29027038/rescue-of-outer-hair-cells-with-antisense-oligonucleotides-in-usher-mice-is-dependent-on-age-of-treatment
#7
Abhilash Ponnath, Frederic F Depreux, Francine M Jodelka, Frank Rigo, Hamilton E Farris, Michelle L Hastings, Jennifer J Lentz
The absence of functional outer hair cells is a component of several forms of hereditary hearing impairment, including Usher syndrome, the most common cause of concurrent hearing and vision loss. Antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment of mice with the human Usher mutation, Ush1c c.216G>A, corrects gene expression and significantly improves hearing, as measured by auditory-evoked brainstem responses (ABRs), as well as inner and outer hair cell (IHC and OHC) bundle morphology. However, it is not clear whether the improvement in hearing achieved by ASO treatment involves the functional rescue of outer hair cells...
October 12, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28971333/attentional-modulation-of-envelope-following-responses-at-lower-93-109%C3%A2-hz-but-not-higher-217-233%C3%A2-hz-modulation-rates
#8
Emma Holmes, David W Purcell, Robert P Carlyon, Hedwig E Gockel, Ingrid S Johnsrude
Directing attention to sounds of different frequencies allows listeners to perceive a sound of interest, like a talker, in a mixture. Whether cortically generated frequency-specific attention affects responses as low as the auditory brainstem is currently unclear. Participants attended to either a high- or low-frequency tone stream, which was presented simultaneously and tagged with different amplitude modulation (AM) rates. In a replication design, we showed that envelope-following responses (EFRs) were modulated by attention only when the stimulus AM rate was slow enough for the auditory cortex to track-and not for stimuli with faster AM rates, which are thought to reflect 'purer' brainstem sources...
October 2, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815315/emerging-gene-therapies-for-genetic-hearing-loss
#9
REVIEW
Hena Ahmed, Olga Shubina-Oleinik, Jeffrey R Holt
Gene therapy, or the treatment of human disease using genetic material, for inner ear dysfunction is coming of age. Recent progress in developing gene therapy treatments for genetic hearing loss has demonstrated tantalizing proof-of-principle in animal models. While successful translation of this progress into treatments for humans awaits, there is growing interest from patients, scientists, clinicians, and industry. Nonetheless, it is clear that a number of hurdles remain, and expectations for total restoration of auditory function should remain tempered until these challenges have been overcome...
October 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28755309/spatial-selectivity-in-cochlear-implants-effects-of-asymmetric-waveforms-and-development-of-a-single-point-measure
#10
Robert P Carlyon, John M Deeks, Jaime Undurraga, Olivier Macherey, Astrid van Wieringen
Three experiments studied the extent to which cochlear implant users' spatial selectivity can be manipulated using asymmetric waveforms and tested an efficient method for comparing spatial selectivity produced by different stimuli. Experiment 1 measured forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) for a partial tripolar (pTP) probe. Maskers were presented on bipolar pairs separated by one unused electrode; waveforms were either symmetric biphasic ("SYM") or pseudomonophasic with the short high-amplitude phase being either anodic ("PSA") or cathodic ("PSC") on the more apical electrode...
October 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28752334/erratum-to-a-modeling-study-of-the-responses-of-the-lateral-superior-olive-to-ipsilateral-sinusoidally-amplitude-modulated-tones
#11
Le Wang, H Steven Colburn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28748487/predictions-of-speech-chimaera-intelligibility-using-auditory-nerve-mean-rate-and-spike-timing-neural-cues
#12
Michael R Wirtzfeld, Rasha A Ibrahim, Ian C Bruce
Perceptual studies of speech intelligibility have shown that slow variations of acoustic envelope (ENV) in a small set of frequency bands provides adequate information for good perceptual performance in quiet, whereas acoustic temporal fine-structure (TFS) cues play a supporting role in background noise. However, the implications for neural coding are prone to misinterpretation because the mean-rate neural representation can contain recovered ENV cues from cochlear filtering of TFS. We investigated ENV recovery and spike-time TFS coding using objective measures of simulated mean-rate and spike-timing neural representations of chimaeric speech, in which either the ENV or the TFS is replaced by another signal...
October 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28721606/fluid-structure-finite-element-modelling-and-clinical-measurement-of-the-wideband-acoustic-input-admittance-of-the-newborn-ear-canal-and-middle-ear
#13
Hamid Motallebzadeh, Nima Maftoon, Jacob Pitaro, W Robert J Funnell, Sam J Daniel
The anatomical differences between the newborn ear and the adult one result in different input admittance responses in newborns than those in adults. Taking into account fluid-structure interactions, we have developed a finite-element model to investigate the wideband admittance responses of the ear canal and middle ear in newborns for frequencies up to 10 kHz. We have also performed admittance measurements on a group of 23 infants with ages between 14 and 28 days, for frequencies from 250 to 8000 Hz with 1/12-octave resolution...
October 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28836061/a-re-examination-of-the-effect-of-masker-phase-curvature-on-non-simultaneous-masking
#14
Robert P Carlyon, Sheila Flanagan, John M Deeks
Forward masking of a sinusoidal signal is determined not only by the masker's power spectrum but also by its phase spectrum. Specifically, when the phase spectrum is such that the output of an auditory filter centred on the signal has a highly modulated ("peaked") envelope, there is less masking than when that envelope is flat. This finding has been attributed to non-linearities, such as compression, reducing the average neural response to maskers that produce more peaked auditory filter outputs (Carlyon and Datta, J Acoust Soc Am 101:3636-3647, 1997)...
August 23, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28776202/neurotrophin-gene-therapy-in-deafened-ears-with-cochlear-implants-long-term-effects-on-nerve-survival-and-functional-measures
#15
Bryan E Pfingst, Deborah J Colesa, Donald L Swiderski, Aaron P Hughes, Stefan B Strahl, Moaz Sinan, Yehoash Raphael
Because cochlear implants function by stimulating the auditory nerve, it is assumed that the condition of the nerve plays an important role in the efficacy of the prosthesis. Thus, considerable research has been devoted to methods of preserving the nerve following deafness. Neurotrophins have been identified as a potential contributor to neural health, but most of the research to date has been done in young animals and for short periods (less than 3 to 6 months) after the onset of treatment. The first objective of the current experiment was to examine the effects of a neurotrophin gene therapy delivery method on spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) preservation and function in the long term (5 to 14 months) in mature guinea pigs with cochlear implants...
August 3, 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653118/quantitative-pneumatic-otoscopy-using-a-light-based-ranging-technique
#16
Ryan L Shelton, Ryan M Nolan, Guillermo L Monroy, Paritosh Pande, Michael A Novak, Ryan G Porter, Stephen A Boppart
Otitis media is the leading cause of hearing loss in children. It is commonly associated with fluid in the ear, which can result in up to 45 dB of hearing loss for extended periods of time during a child's most important developmental years. Accurate assessment of middle ear effusions is an important part of understanding otitis media. Current technologies used to diagnose otitis media with effusion are pneumatic otoscopy, tympanometry, and acoustic reflectometry. While all of these techniques can reasonably diagnose the presence of an effusion, they provide limited information about the infection present behind the tympanic membrane...
August 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28646272/rhesus-cochlear-and-vestibular-functions-are-preserved-after-inner-ear-injection-of-saline-volume-sufficient-for-gene-therapy-delivery
#17
Chenkai Dai, Mohamed Lehar, Daniel Q Sun, Lani Swarthout Rvt, John P Carey, Tim MacLachlan, Doug Brough, Hinrich Staecker, Alexandra M Della Santina, Timothy E Hullar, Charles C Della Santina
Sensorineural losses of hearing and vestibular sensation due to hair cell dysfunction are among the most common disabilities. Recent preclinical research demonstrates that treatment of the inner ear with a variety of compounds, including gene therapy agents, may elicit regeneration and/or repair of hair cells in animals exposed to ototoxic medications or other insults to the inner ear. Delivery of gene therapy may also offer a means for treatment of hereditary hearing loss. However, injection of a fluid volume sufficient to deliver an adequate dose of a pharmacologic agent could, in theory, cause inner ear trauma that compromises functional outcome...
August 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593438/eye-movements-are-correctly-timed-during-walking-despite-bilateral-vestibular-hypofunction
#18
Eric R Anson, Tim Kiemel, John P Carey, John J Jeka
Individuals with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) often report symptoms of oscillopsia (the perception that the world is bouncing or unstable) during walking. Efference copy/proprioception contributes to locomotion gaze stability in animals, sometimes inhibiting the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Gaze stability requires both adequate eye velocity and appropriate timing of eye movements. It is unknown whether eye velocity (VOR gain), timing (phase), or both are impaired for individuals with BVH during walking...
August 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447225/functional-interplay-between-the-putative-measures-of-rostral-and-caudal-efferent-regulation-of-speech-perception-in-noise
#19
Sandeep Maruthy, U Ajith Kumar, G Nike Gnanateja
Efferent modulation has been demonstrated to be very important for speech perception, especially in the presence of noise. We examined the functional relationship between two efferent systems: the rostral and caudal efferent pathways and their individual influences on speech perception in noise. Earlier studies have shown that these two efferent mechanisms were correlated with speech perception in noise. However, previously, these mechanisms were studied in isolation, and their functional relationship with each other was not investigated...
August 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439720/the-impact-of-oral-promethazine-on-human-whole-body-motion-perceptual-thresholds
#20
Ana Diaz-Artiles, Adrian J Priesol, Torin K Clark, David P Sherwood, Charles M Oman, Laurence R Young, Faisal Karmali
Despite the widespread treatment of motion sickness symptoms using drugs and the involvement of the vestibular system in motion sickness, little is known about the effects of anti-motion sickness drugs on vestibular perception. In particular, the impact of oral promethazine, widely used for treating motion sickness, on vestibular perceptual thresholds has not previously been quantified. We examined whether promethazine (25 mg) alters vestibular perceptual thresholds in a counterbalanced, double-blind, within-subject study...
August 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
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