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Nature Cell Biology

Fiorenza Fumagalli, Julia Noack, Timothy J Bergmann, Eduardo Cebollero Presmanes, Giorgia Brambilla Pisoni, Elisa Fasana, Ilaria Fregno, Carmela Galli, Marisa Loi, Tatiana Soldà, Rocco D'Antuono, Andrea Raimondi, Martin Jung, Armin Melnyk, Stefan Schorr, Anne Schreiber, Luca Simonelli, Luca Varani, Caroline Wilson-Zbinden, Oliver Zerbe, Kay Hofmann, Matthias Peter, Manfredo Quadroni, Richard Zimmermann, Maurizio Molinari
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a site of protein biogenesis in eukaryotic cells. Perturbing ER homeostasis activates stress programs collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR enhances production of ER-resident chaperones and enzymes to reduce the burden of misfolded proteins. On resolution of ER stress, ill-defined, selective autophagic programs remove excess ER components. Here we identify Sec62, a constituent of the translocon complex regulating protein import in the mammalian ER, as an ER-resident autophagy receptor...
October 17, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Alexandros Strikoudis, Charalampos Lazaris, Thomas Trimarchi, Antonio L Galvao Neto, Yan Yang, Panagiotis Ntziachristos, Scott Rothbart, Shannon Buckley, Igor Dolgalev, Matthias Stadtfeld, Brian D Strahl, Brian D Dynlacht, Aristotelis Tsirigos, Iannis Aifantis
Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) self-renew or differentiate into all tissues of the developing embryo and cell-specification factors are necessary to balance gene expression. Here we delineate the function of the PHD-finger protein 5a (Phf5a) in ESC self-renewal and ascribe its role in regulating pluripotency, cellular reprogramming and myoblast specification. We demonstrate that Phf5a is essential for maintaining pluripotency, since depleted ESCs exhibit hallmarks of differentiation. Mechanistically, we attribute Phf5a function to the stabilization of the Paf1 transcriptional complex and control of RNA polymerase II elongation on pluripotency loci...
October 17, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Ting Ni, Xiao-Yan Li, Na Lu, Teng An, Zhi-Ping Liu, Rong Fu, Wen-Cong Lv, Yi-Wei Zhang, Xiao-Jun Xu, R Grant Rowe, Yong-Shun Lin, Amanda Scherer, Tamar Feinberg, Xiao-Qi Zheng, Bao-An Chen, X Shirley Liu, Qing-Long Guo, Zhao-Qiu Wu, Stephen J Weiss
The zinc-finger transcription factor Snail1 is inappropriately expressed in breast cancer and associated with poor prognosis. While interrogating human databases, we uncovered marked decreases in relapse-free survival of breast cancer patients expressing high Snail1 levels in tandem with wild-type, but not mutant, p53. Using a Snail1 conditional knockout model of mouse breast cancer that maintains wild-type p53, we find that Snail1 plays an essential role in tumour progression by controlling the expansion and activity of tumour-initiating cells in preneoplastic glands and established tumours, whereas it is not required for normal mammary development...
October 17, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Laurynas Pasakarnis, Erich Frei, Emmanuel Caussinus, Markus Affolter, Damian Brunner
Tissue morphogenesis requires coordination of multiple force-producing components. During dorsal closure in fly embryogenesis, an epidermis opening closes. A tensioned epidermal actin/MyosinII cable, which surrounds the opening, produces a force that is thought to combine with another MyosinII force mediating apical constriction of the amnioserosa cells that fill the opening. A model proposing that each force could autonomously drive dorsal closure was recently challenged by a model in which the two forces combine in a ratchet mechanism...
October 17, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Antoine Ducuing, Stéphane Vincent
The actin cable is a supracellular structure that embryonic epithelia produce to close gaps. However, the action of the cable remains debated. Here, we address the function of the cable using Drosophila dorsal closure, a paradigm to understand wound healing. First, we show that the actin cytoskeleton protein Zasp52 is specifically required for actin cable formation. Next, we used Zasp52 loss of function to dissect the mechanism of action of the cable. Surprisingly, closure dynamics are perfect in Zasp52 mutants: the cable is therefore dispensable for closure, even in the absence of the amnioserosa...
October 17, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Marcello Stanzione, Marek Baumann, Frantzeskos Papanikos, Ihsan Dereli, Julian Lange, Angelique Ramlal, Daniel Tränkner, Hiroki Shibuya, Bernard de Massy, Yoshinori Watanabe, Maria Jasin, Scott Keeney, Attila Tóth
DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are induced by SPO11 during meiosis to initiate recombination-mediated pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Germline genome integrity requires spatiotemporal control of DSB formation, which involves the proteinaceous chromosome axis along the core of each meiotic chromosome. In particular, a component of unsynapsed axes, HORMAD1, promotes DSB formation in unsynapsed regions where DSB formation must occur to ensure completion of synapsis. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanism has remained elusive...
October 10, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Thomas E Bass, Jessica W Luzwick, Gina Kavanaugh, Clinton Carroll, Huzefa Dungrawala, Gloria G Glick, Michael D Feldkamp, Reid Putney, Walter J Chazin, David Cortez
The ATR checkpoint kinase coordinates cellular responses to DNA replication stress. Budding yeast contain three activators of Mec1 (the ATR orthologue); however, only TOPBP1 is known to activate ATR in vertebrates. We identified ETAA1 as a replication stress response protein in two proteomic screens. ETAA1-deficient cells accumulate double-strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges, and other hallmarks of genome instability. They are also hypersensitive to replication stress and have increased frequencies of replication fork collapse...
October 10, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Nicola Festuccia, Agnès Dubois, Sandrine Vandormael-Pournin, Elena Gallego Tejeda, Adrien Mouren, Sylvain Bessonnard, Florian Mueller, Caroline Proux, Michel Cohen-Tannoudji, Pablo Navarro
Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells maintain their identity throughout virtually infinite cell divisions. This phenomenon, referred to as self-renewal, depends on a network of sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) and requires daughter cells to accurately reproduce the gene expression pattern of the mother. However, dramatic chromosomal changes take place in mitosis, generally leading to the eviction of TFs from chromatin. Here, we report that Esrrb, a major pluripotency TF, remains bound to key regulatory regions during mitosis...
October 10, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Lara Wahlster, George Q Daley
De novo generation of haematopoietic stem cells from different human pluripotent stem cell sources remains a high priority for haematology and regenerative medicine. At present, efficient derivation of functional haematopoietic stem cells with the capability for definitive in vivo engraftment and multi-lineage potential remains challenging. Here, we discuss recent progress and strategies to overcome obstacles that have thwarted past efforts. In addition, we review promising advances in the generation of mature blood lineages and the potential of induced pluripotent stem cells...
October 10, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Peter Haahr, Saskia Hoffmann, Maxim A X Tollenaere, Teresa Ho, Luis Ignacio Toledo, Matthias Mann, Simon Bekker-Jensen, Markus Räschle, Niels Mailand
Activation of the ATR kinase following perturbations to DNA replication relies on a complex mechanism involving ATR recruitment to RPA-coated single-stranded DNA via its binding partner ATRIP and stimulation of ATR kinase activity by TopBP1. Here, we discovered an independent ATR activation pathway in vertebrates, mediated by the uncharacterized protein ETAA1 (Ewing's tumour-associated antigen 1). Human ETAA1 accumulates at DNA damage sites via dual RPA-binding motifs and promotes replication fork progression and integrity, ATR signalling and cell survival after genotoxic insults...
October 10, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Weiyue Zheng, Masataka Umitsu, Ishaan Jagan, Charles W Tran, Noboru Ishiyama, Michael BeGora, Kiyomi Araki, Pamela S Ohashi, Mitsuhiko Ikura, Senthil K Muthuswamy
The polarity protein Scribble (SCRIB) regulates apical-basal polarity, directional migration and tumour suppression in Drosophila and mammals. Here we report that SCRIB is an important regulator of myeloid cell functions including bacterial infection and inflammation. SCRIB interacts directly with the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex in a PSD95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ)-domain-dependent manner and is required for NOX-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in culture and in vivo. On bacterial infection, SCRIB localized to phagosomes in a leucine-rich repeat-dependent manner and promoted ROS production within phagosomes to kill bacteria...
October 3, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Rachelle W Johnson, Elizabeth C Finger, Monica M Olcina, Marta Vilalta, Todd Aguilera, Yu Miao, Alyssa R Merkel, Joshua R Johnson, Julie A Sterling, Joy Y Wu, Amato J Giaccia
Breast cancer cells frequently home to the bone marrow, where they may enter a dormant state before forming a bone metastasis. Several members of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family are implicated in breast cancer bone colonization, but the role for the IL-6 cytokine leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in this process is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that LIF provides a pro-dormancy signal to breast cancer cells in the bone. In breast cancer patients, LIF receptor (LIFR) levels are lower with bone metastases and are significantly and inversely correlated with patient outcome and hypoxia gene activity...
September 19, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Kazuki Kodo, Sang-Ging Ong, Fereshteh Jahanbani, Vittavat Termglinchan, Keiichi Hirono, Kolsoum InanlooRahatloo, Antje D Ebert, Praveen Shukla, Oscar J Abilez, Jared M Churko, Ioannis Karakikes, Gwanghyun Jung, Fukiko Ichida, Sean M Wu, Michael P Snyder, Daniel Bernstein, Joseph C Wu
Left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) is the third most prevalent cardiomyopathy in children and its pathogenesis has been associated with the developmental defect of the embryonic myocardium. We show that patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) generated from LVNC patients carrying a mutation in the cardiac transcription factor TBX20 recapitulate a key aspect of the pathological phenotype at the single-cell level and this was associated with perturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signalling...
October 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Min Pan, Michael A Reid, Xazmin H Lowman, Rajan P Kulkarni, Thai Q Tran, Xiaojing Liu, Ying Yang, Jenny E Hernandez-Davies, Kimberly K Rosales, Haiqing Li, Willy Hugo, Chunying Song, Xiangdong Xu, Dustin E Schones, David K Ann, Viviana Gradinaru, Roger S Lo, Jason W Locasale, Mei Kong
Poorly organized tumour vasculature often results in areas of limited nutrient supply and hypoxia. Despite our understanding of solid tumour responses to hypoxia, how nutrient deprivation regionally affects tumour growth and therapeutic response is poorly understood. Here, we show that the core region of solid tumours displayed glutamine deficiency compared with other amino acids. Low glutamine in tumour core regions led to dramatic histone hypermethylation due to decreased α-ketoglutarate levels, a key cofactor for the Jumonji-domain-containing histone demethylases...
October 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Audrey Guesdon, Franck Bazile, Rubén M Buey, Renu Mohan, Solange Monier, Ruddi Rodríguez García, Morgane Angevin, Claire Heichette, Ralph Wieneke, Robert Tampé, Laurence Duchesne, Anna Akhmanova, Michel O Steinmetz, Denis Chrétien
EB1 is a microtubule plus-end tracking protein that recognizes GTP-tubulin dimers in microtubules and thus represents a unique probe to investigate the architecture of the GTP cap of growing microtubule ends. Here, we conjugated EB1 to gold nanoparticles (EB1-gold) and imaged by cryo-electron tomography its interaction with dynamic microtubules assembled in vitro from purified tubulin. EB1-gold forms comets at the ends of microtubules assembled in the presence of GTP, and interacts with the outer surface of curved and straight tubulin sheets as well as closed regions of the microtubule lattice...
October 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Yang Li, Meng Xu, Xiao Ding, Chen Yan, Zhiqin Song, Lianwan Chen, Xiahe Huang, Xin Wang, Youli Jian, Guihua Tang, Changyong Tang, Yingtong Di, Shuzhen Mu, Xuezhao Liu, Kai Liu, Ting Li, Yingchun Wang, Long Miao, Weixiang Guo, Xiaojiang Hao, Chonglin Yang
Lysosomes respond to environmental cues by controlling their own biogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we describe a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent and mTORC1-independent mechanism for regulating lysosome biogenesis, which provides insights into previously reported effects of PKC on lysosomes. By identifying lysosome-inducing compounds we show that PKC couples activation of the TFEB transcription factor with inactivation of the ZKSCAN3 transcriptional repressor through two parallel signalling cascades...
October 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Charlotte Aumeier, Laura Schaedel, Jérémie Gaillard, Karin John, Laurent Blanchoin, Manuel Théry
The dynamic instability of microtubules is characterized by slow growth phases stochastically interrupted by rapid depolymerizations called catastrophes. Rescue events can arrest the depolymerization and restore microtubule elongation. However, the origin of these rescue events remains unexplained. Here we show that microtubule lattice self-repair, in structurally damaged sites, is responsible for the rescue of microtubule growth. Tubulin photo-conversion in cells revealed that free tubulin dimers can incorporate along the shafts of microtubules, especially in regions where microtubules cross each other, form bundles or become bent due to mechanical constraints...
October 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Sanguk Yun, Madhusudhan Budatha, James E Dahlman, Brian G Coon, Ryan T Cameron, Robert Langer, Daniel G Anderson, George Baillie, Martin A Schwartz
Atherosclerosis is primarily a disease of lipid metabolism and inflammation; however, it is also closely associated with endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling, with fibronectin accumulating in the laminin-collagen basement membrane. To investigate how fibronectin modulates inflammation in arteries, we replaced the cytoplasmic tail of the fibronectin receptor integrin α5 with that of the collagen/laminin receptor integrin α2. This chimaera suppressed inflammatory signalling in endothelial cells on fibronectin and in knock-in mice...
October 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Ji-Hoon Kim, Gi-Chan Han, Ji-Yun Seo, Inkuk Park, Wookjin Park, Hyun-Woo Jeong, Su Hyeon Lee, Sung-Hwan Bae, Jinwoo Seong, Min-Kyu Yum, Sang-Hyeon Hann, Young-Guen Kwon, Daekwan Seo, Man Ho Choi, Young-Yun Kong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 28, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
Jonas W Højfeldt, Kristian Helin
Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells.
September 28, 2016: Nature Cell Biology
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