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Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153789/intensive-care-unit-randomised-trial-comparing-two-approaches-to-oxygen-therapy-icu-rox-results-of-the-pilot-phase
#1
LETTER
Paul Young
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153788/intensive-care-unit-randomised-trial-comparing-two-approaches-to-oxygen-therapy-icu-rox-results-of-the-pilot-phase
#2
Hadrien Winiszewski, Loic Barrot, Gaël Piton, Gilles Capellier
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153787/body-temperature-measurement-methods-and-targets-in-australian-and-new-zealand-intensive-care-units
#3
Salvatore L Cutuli, Eduardo A Osawa, Neil J Glassford, David Marshall, Christopher T Eyeington, Glenn M Eastwood, Paul J Young, Rinaldo Bellomo
OBJECTIVE: In Australian and New Zealand (ANZ) intensive care units (ICUs), the preferred measurement methods and targets for temperature remain uncertain, but are crucial for future interventional studies. We aimed to investigate the reported use of temperature measurement methods and targets in ANZ ICUs. DESIGN, SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: Structured online questionnaire delivered via the email list of the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153786/chlorhexidine-washing-in-intensive-care-does-not-reduce-bloodstream-infections-blood-culture-contamination-and-drug-resistant-microorganism-acquisition-an-interrupted-time-series-analysis
#4
Roel Kengen, Elcke Thoonen, Kathryn Daveson, Bronwyn Loong, Helen Rodgers, Wendy Beckingham, Karina Kennedy, Ruwan Suwandarathne, Frank van Haren
BACKGROUND: Health care-associated infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in intensive care patients. The effect of daily washing with chlorhexidine on these infections is controversial. METHODS: Single-centre, retrospective, open-label, sequential period, interrupted time series (ITS) analysis in a 31-bed tertiary referral mixed intensive care unit (ICU), comparing daily washing with water and soap (from January 2011 to August 2013) with chlorhexidine washing (from November 2013 to December 2015), after the introduction of a unit-level policy of chlorhexidine washing...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153785/predictors-of-mortality-after-extracorporeal-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#5
Bishoy Zakhary, Vinodh B Nanjayya, Jayne Sheldrake, Kathleen Collins, Joshua F Ihle, Vincent Pellegrino
OBJECTIVE: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a promising adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in refractory cardiac arrest (CA). Factors associated with outcome are incompletely characterised. The aim of our study was to identify pre-ECMO factors associated with in-hospital mortality after extracorporeal CPR (ECPR). DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of patients. SETTING: Academic quaternary referral hospital...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153784/increasing-frequency-of-critically-ill-patient-turns-is-associated-with-a-reduction-in-pressure-injuries
#6
Jai N Darvall, Lidgalem Mesfin, Alexandra Gorelik
OBJECTIVE: Pressure injuries are a significant problem for critically ill patients; they increase morbidity, cost, and duration of hospitalisation. Prolonged immobility is a major risk factor, but evidence guiding how frequently patients should be turned to prevent this complication is limited. We aimed to determine the impact of changing from 5-hourly to 3-hourly turns on pressure injury incidence in critically ill patients. DESIGN: We conducted a pre-post intervention evaluation study, comparing a 6-month period during which patient turns were 5-hourly (1 July 2015 - 31 December 2015) with a 6-month period during which turns were 3-hourly (1 February 2016 - 31 August 2016)...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153783/magnesium-sulfate-therapy-after-cardiac-surgery-a-before-and-after-study-comparing-strategies-involving-bolus-and-continuous-infusion
#7
Eduardo A Osawa, Peter Biesenbach, Salvatore L Cutuli, Glenn M Eastwood, Johan Mårtensson, George Matalanis, Jessica Fairley, Rinaldo Bellomo
BACKGROUND: Magnesium therapy may reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery. However, studies are heterogeneous in relation to dosage and method of delivery and no studies have directly compared the biochemical effect of different delivery strategies. AIMS: We conducted a before-and-after study to compare the effects of two strategies of magnesium delivery after cardiac surgery. METHODS: We conducted a prospective interventional before-and-after study...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153782/fluid-resuscitation-associated-with-elevated-angiopoietin-2-and-length-of-mechanical-ventilation-after-cardiac-surgery
#8
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Rachael Parke, Shailesh Bihari, Dani-Louise Dixon, Eileen Gilder, Elena Cavallaro, Shay McGuinness, Andrew D Bersten
BACKGROUND: Fluid restriction in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome increases ventilator-free days while lowering plasma angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), a marker of pulmonary endothelial injury. We hypothesised that fluid resuscitation may lead to endothelial injury after cardiac surgery and analysed Ang-2, angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2 ) levels and the impact of fluid management on ventilation time. METHODS: Patients enrolled in a single-centre, prospectively randomised interventional study of liberal or conservative fluid resuscitation strategy had plasma Ang-2, Ang-1 and PLA2 levels measured at baseline (pre-operative), 6 and 24 hours after commencement of cardiopulmonary bypass, and analysed by linear mixed models as liberal v conservative (intention to treat) or high v low fluid group (actual treatment, ≥ 3250 mL of fluid administered), and further subclassified as EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation) II ≥ 0...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153781/design-and-statistical-analysis-plan-for-a-trial-comparing-a-conservative-fluid-management-strategy-with-usual-care-in-patients-after-cardiac-surgery-the-fab-study
#9
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Rachael Parke, Eileen Gilder, Michael Gillham, Laurence Walker, Michael Bailey, Shay McGuinness
BACKGROUND: Cardiac surgery is one of the most frequently performed major surgical procedures. Following surgery, haemodynamic instability and prevention of organ dysfunction may be treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) with intravenous fluid, inotropes and vasopressors. In other surgical groups, liberal intravenous fluid administration and a positive fluid balance have been associated with adverse outcomes and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. There is a paucity of evidence to guide intravenous fluid administration in cardiac surgery patients...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153780/a-cluster-randomised-crossover-registry-embedded-clinical-trial-of-proton-pump-inhibitors-versus-histamine-2-receptor-blockers-for-ulcer-prophylaxis-therapy-in-the-intensive-care-unit-peptic-study-study-protocol
#10
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Paul J Young, Sean M Bagshaw, Andrew Forbes, Alistair Nichol, Stephen E Wright, Rinaldo Bellomo, Michael J Bailey, Richard W Beasley, Glenn M Eastwood, Marino Festa, David Gattas, Frank van Haren, Edward Litton, Paul R Mouncey, Leanlove Navarra, David Pilcher, Diane M Mackle, Colin J McArthur, Shay P McGuinness, Manoj K Saxena, Steve Webb, Kathryn M Rowan
BACKGROUND: The balance of risks and benefits with using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) versus histamine-2 receptor blockers (H2 RB) for stress ulcer prophylaxis in patients who are invasively ventilated in the intensive care unit (ICU) is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To describe the study protocol and statistical analysis plan for the Proton Pump Inhibitors versus Histamine-2 Receptor Blockers for Ulcer Prophylaxis Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit (PEPTIC) study. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Protocol for a prospective, multicentre, randomised, open-label, cluster crossover, registry-embedded trial to be conducted in 50 ICUs in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the United Kingdom...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153779/stability-of-intravenous-vitamin-c-solutions-a-technical-report
#11
Anitra Carr, Christina Wohlrab, Paul Young, Rinaldo Bellomo
BACKGROUND: There has recently been a surge of interest in intravenous (IV) vitamin C as a potential therapy in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, particularly in those with septic shock. Establishing the safety and efficacy of IV vitamin C therapy through rigorously conducted randomised controlled trials is a priority. A key logistical issue for such trials is to establish the stability of IV vitamin C solutions prepared for infusion ahead of time. Accordingly, we aimed to assess the stability of IV vitamin C solutions over time using doses of vitamin C from previous pilot trials...
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153778/understanding-the-rationale-for-parenteral-ascorbate-vitamin-c-during-an-acute-inflammatory-reaction-a-biochemical-perspective
#12
Robert McNamara, Adam M Deane, James Anstey, Rinaldo Bellomo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153777/what-are-the-next-steps-for-vitamin-c-in-sepsis
#13
EDITORIAL
Andrew Udy, Tomoko Fujii, Nora Luethi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30153776/in-this-issue-of-ccr
#14
Rinaldo Bellomo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29852855/repeated-sensor-use-for-regional-cerebral-oxygenation-measurements-by-near-infrared-spectroscopy-a-technical-report
#15
Paolo Ancona, Christopher T Eyeington, Salvatore L Cutuli, Neil J Glassford, Glenn M Eastwood, Rinaldo Bellomo
OBJECTIVE: Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used in clinical practice to assess regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (StcO2 ). There is no evidence whether repeated use of the same sensor affects StcO2 measurements. We aimed to assess whether there was a significant systematic decrease or increase in StcO2 when NIRS sensors were reused. DESIGN: Participants were divided into three groups (A, B and C). StcO2 was recorded over 5 minutes daily for 5 days in Groups A and B ("new-sensor" [NS] period; sensor age, 1-5 days) and in Groups A and C, with the sensor previously used for A ("extended-use" [EU] period; sensor age, 6-10 days)...
June 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29852854/effect-of-active-temperature-management-on-mortality-in-intensive-care-unit-patients
#16
REVIEW
Jonathan Dallimore, Stefan Ebmeier, Darmiga Thayabaran, Rinaldo Bellomo, Gordon Bernard, Frédérique Schortgen, Manoj Saxena, Richard Beasley, Mark Weatherall, Paul Young
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of active temperature management on mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay, as well as the relative efficacy of antipyretic medications and physical cooling devices for achieving reductions in temperature in critically ill adults. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating treatments administered to febrile patients in order to reduce body temperature...
June 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29852853/permissive-hypercapnia-alveolar-recruitment-and-low-airway-pressure-pharlap-a-protocol-for-a-phase-2-trial-in-patients-with-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#17
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Carol Hodgson, David Jamie Cooper, Yaseen Arabi, Victoria Bennett, Andrew Bersten, Kathy Brickell, Andrew Davies, Ciara Fahey, John Fraser, Shay McGuinness, Lynne Murray, Rachael Parke, David Tuxen, Shirley Vallance, Meredith Young, Alistair D Nichol
BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation is a life-saving intervention that maintains gas exchange in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); however, it is associated with high mortality and it may augment, or even initiate, lung injury. An open lung ventilation strategy that combines alveolar recruitment manoeuvres with individually titrated positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and targeting lower tidal volumes, or driving pressures by a permissive approach to hypercapnia, may reduce the lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation...
June 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29852852/fluid-bolus-therapy-in-critically-ill-children-a-survey-of-practice-among-paediatric-intensive-care-doctors-in-australia-and-new-zealand
#18
Ben Gelbart, Luregn Schlapbach, Anusha Ganeshalingham, Subodh Ganu, Simon Erickson, Felix Oberender, Monsurul Hoq, Gary Williams, Shane George, Marino Festa
OBJECTIVE: Fluid bolus therapy (FBT) is a widely used intervention in paediatric critical illness. The aim of this study was to describe the attitudes and practices towards FBT of paediatric intensive care doctors in Australia and New Zealand. DESIGN: An internet-based survey of paediatric intensive care doctors in Australia and New Zealand between 7 and 30 November 2016. SETTING: Paediatric intensive care units with greater than 400 admissions annually...
June 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29852851/the-comparative-effects-of-3-saline-and-0-5m-sodium-lactate-on-cardiac-function-a-randomised-crossover-study-in-volunteers
#19
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Marek Nalos, Euguenia Kholodniak, Louise Smith, Sam Orde, Iris Ting, Michel Slama, Ian Seppelt, Anthony S McLean, Stephen Huang
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the metabolic and cardiac effects of intravenous administration of two hypertonic solutions - 3% saline (SAL) and 0.5M sodium lactate (LAC). DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A randomised, doubleblind, crossover study in ten human volunteers. Intravenous bolus of either SAL or LAC at 3 mL/kg over 20 min followed by a 2 mL/kg infusion over 60 min. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acid base parameters and echocardiographic indices of cardiac function, cardiac output (CO), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and mitral annular peak systolic velocity (Sm) before and after infusion of SAL or LAC...
June 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29852850/sample-size-calculations-for-cluster-randomised-crossover-trials-in-australian-and-new-zealand-intensive-care-research
#20
Sarah J Arnup, Joanne E McKenzie, David Pilcher, Rinaldo Bellomo, Andrew B Forbes
OBJECTIVE: The cluster randomised crossover (CRXO) design provides an opportunity to conduct randomised controlled trials to evaluate low risk interventions in the intensive care setting. Our aim is to provide a tutorial on how to perform a sample size calculation for a CRXO trial, focusing on the meaning of the elements required for the calculations, with application to intensive care trials. DATA SOURCES: We use all-cause in-hospital mortality from the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database clinical registry to illustrate the sample size calculations...
June 2018: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
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