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Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29774957/progress-and-challenges-in-consolidating-the-management-of-amazonian-protected-areas-and-indigenous-territories
#1
Raymond E Gullison, Jared Hardner
Achieving the effective management of all existing protected areas and indigenous territories in the Amazon Biome may be needed to avoid a deforestation "tipping point" beyond which regional climatic feedbacks and global climate change interact to catalyze irreversible drying and savannization of large portions of the biome. However, the time and money required to consolidate the effective management of all types of protected sites in the Amazon is still poorly understood. At present, protected areas and indigenous territories cover 45...
May 18, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29767466/addressing-transboundary-conservation-challenges-through-marine-spatial-prioritization
#2
Elena Gissi, Jennifer McGowan, Chiara Venier, Davide Di Carlo, Francesco Musco, Stefano Menegon, Peter Mackelworth, Tundi Agardy, Hugh Possingham
The Adriatic and Ionian Region (AIR) is an important area for both strategic maritime development and biodiversity conservation in the European Union (EU). However, given that both EU and non-EU countries border the sea, multiple legal and regulatory frameworks operate at different scales which can hinder the coordinated long-term sustainable development of the region. Transboundary marine (or maritime) spatial planning can help overcome these challenges by building consensus on planning objectives and making the trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and its influence on economically important sectors more explicit...
May 16, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29752832/examining-conservation-compliance-with-randomized-response-technique-analyses
#3
Charlotte H Chang, Maarten J L F Cruyff, Xingli Giam
Understanding conservation non-compliance-violations of laws or social norms designed to protect natural resources from overexploitation-is a priority for conservation research and management. As direct questioning about stigmatized behaviors can be biased, researchers have adopted more complex indirect questioning techniques. The randomized response technique (RRT) is one of the most powerful indirect survey methods, yet analyses of these data require sophisticated statistical models. To date, there has been limited user-friendly software to analyze RRT data, particularly so for models that combine information from multiple RRT questions...
May 12, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29744936/distribution-and-protection-of-climatic-refugia-in-north-america
#4
Julia L Michalak, Joshua J Lawler, David R Roberts, Carlos Carroll
As evidenced by past climatic refugia, locations projected to harbor remnants of present day climates may serve as critical refugia for current biodiversity in the face of modern climate change. Here, we map potential future climatic refugia across North America, defined as locations with increasingly rare climatic conditions. We identified these locations by tracking projected changes in the size and distribution of climate analogs over time. We used biologically-derived thresholds to define analogs and tested the impacts of dispersal limitation using four distances to limit analog searches...
May 10, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738621/using-social-network-research-to-improve-outcomes-in-natural-resource-management
#5
REVIEW
Julie E Groce, Megan A Farrelly, Bradley S Jorgensen, Carly N Cook
The conservation and management of natural resources operates within social-ecological systems, in which resource users are embedded in social and environmental contexts that influence their management decisions. Characterizing social networks of resource users has received growing interest as an approach for understanding social influences on decision-making, and social network analysis (SNA) has emerged as a useful technique to explore these relationships. In this review, we synthesize how SNA has been used in studies of natural resource management...
May 8, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738619/prioritizing-sites-for-conservation-based-on-similarity-to-historical-baselines-and-feasibility-of-protection
#6
Traci Popejoy, Charles R Randklev, Thomas M Neeson, Caryn C Vaughn
The shifting baseline syndrome concept advocates for the use of historical knowledge to inform conservation baselines, but does not address the feasibility of restoring sites to those baselines. In many regions, conservation feasibility varies among sites due to differences in resource availability, statutory power, and land-owner participation. We use zooarchaeological records to identify a historical baseline of the freshwater mussel community's composition before Euro-American influence at a river-reach scale...
May 8, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29737556/time-discounting-and-protected-area-priorities
#7
Paul R Armsworth
Should conservation organizations focus on protecting habitats that are at imminent risk of being converted but are expensive or more remote areas that are less immediately threatened but where a large amount of land can be set aside? Variants of this trade-off commonly arise in spatial planning. We examined this trade-off using models of land use change near a deforestation frontier. The optimal choice of where to protect was determined by how decisions taken today accounted for ecological benefits and economic costs of conservation actions that would occur sometime in the future...
May 8, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29722069/investigating-cumulative-effects-across-ecological-scales
#8
REVIEW
Emma E Hodgson, Benjamin S Halpern
Species, habitats and ecosystems across the globe are increasingly exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors, fueling a rapidly expanding research program to understand the cumulative impacts of these environmental modifications. Since the 1970s when much of the research in cumulative effects assessment (CEA) began, a growing set of methods has been developed through two parallel, sometimes connected, streams of research within the applied (practitioner) and academic (researcher) realms. Past reviews of CEA methods have focused on one of these research streams, namely approaches used by practitioners...
May 2, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29718564/decision-complacency-and-conservation-planning
#9
Charlie J Gardner, Patrick O Waeber, Onja H Razafindratsima, Lucienne Wilmé
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29707822/when-and-how-to-use-q-methodology-to-understand-perspectives-in-conservation-research
#10
Aiora Zabala, Chris Sandbrook, Nibedita Mukherjee
Understanding human perspectives is critical in a range of conservation contexts, for example, to help overcome conflicts or to develop projects that are acceptable to relevant stakeholders. Q methodology is a unique semi-quantitative technique to explore human perspectives. It brings together the transparency of a structured quantitative procedure with the depth of understanding of a qualitative approach. It has been applied for decades in other disciplines and recently gained traction in conservation (>75% of Q studies in this field published since 2012)...
April 30, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29700860/summoning-compassion-to-address-the-challenges-of-conservation
#11
Arian D Wallach, Marc Bekoff, Chelsea Batavia, Michael P Nelson, Daniel Ramp
Conservation practice is informed by science, but also reflects ethical beliefs about how we ought to value and interact with the Earth's biota. As human activities continue to drive extinctions and diminish critical life-sustaining ecosystem processes, achieving conservation goals becomes increasingly urgent. In our determination to react decisively, conservation challenges can be handled without due deliberation, particularly when wildlife individuals are sacrificed "for the greater good" of wildlife collectives (populations, species, ecosystems)...
April 27, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29693743/invisible-megafauna
#12
Arian D Wallach, Erick J Lundgren, William J Ripple, Daniel Ramp
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 25, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691912/effect-of-hybridization-with-genome-exclusion-on-extinction-risk
#13
Claudio S Quilodrán, Mathias Currat, Juan I Montoya-Burgos
Human-induced habitat changes may lead to the breakdown of reproductive barriers between distantly related species. This phenomenon may result in fertile first-generation hybrids (F1 ) that exclude the genome of one parental species during gametogenesis, thus disabling introgression. The species extinction risk associated with hybridization with genome exclusion is largely underappreciated because the phenomenon produces only F1 hybrid phenotype, leading to the misconception that hybrids are sterile and potentially of minor conservation concern...
April 24, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29687520/conservation-mycology-in-australia-and-the-potential-role-of-citizen-science
#14
Peter J Irga, Katherine Barker, Fraser R Torpy
Fungi are undoubtedly important for ecosystem functioning, however they are relatively poorly considered in biodiversity conservation planning. Fungi have been omitted or given scant attention in most biodiversity policy documents, management plans and formal conservation schedules throughout the world. This oversight may be due to a general lack of awareness in the scientific community, compounded by a scarcity of mycology-associated curricula at the tertiary level, along with a lack of mycologists in research institutions...
April 23, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676813/efficacy-of-extracting-indices-from-large-scale-acoustic-recordings-to-monitor-biodiversity
#15
Rachel Buxton, Megan F McKenna, Mary Clapp, Erik Meyer, Erik Stabenau, Lisa M Angeloni, Kevin Crooks, George Wittemyer
Passive acoustic monitoring has the potential to be a powerful approach for assessing biodiversity across large spatial and temporal scales. However, extracting meaningful information from recordings can be prohibitively time consuming. Acoustic indices offer a relatively rapid method for processing acoustic data and are increasingly used to characterize biological communities. We examine the ability of acoustic indices to predict the diversity and abundance of biological sounds within recordings. First we reviewed the acoustic index literature and found that over 60 indices have been applied to a range of objectives with varying success...
April 20, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29660179/social-license-as-an-emergent-property-of-political-interactions-response-to-kendal-and-ford-2017
#16
Stephen T Garnett, Kerstin K Zander, Catherine J Robinson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 16, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29660178/need-for-empirical-evidence-to-support-use-of-social-license-in-conservation-reply-to-garnett-et-al
#17
Dave Kendal, Rebecca M Ford
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 16, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29660170/wrestling-with-the-complexity-of-evaluation-for-organizations-at-the-boundary-of-science-policy-and-practice
#18
Ruth Pitt, Carina Wyborn, Glenn Page, Jonathon Hutton, Malika Virah Sawmy, Melanie Ryan, Louise Gallagher
Boundary organizations have been promoted as a measure to improve the effectiveness of conservation efforts by building stronger relationships between scientists, policy makers, industry and practitioners (Cook et al. 2013). While their promise has been discussed in theory, the work of and expectations for boundary organizations are less defined in practice. Biodiversity conservation is characterized by complexity, uncertainty, dissent and tight budgets, so boundary organizations face the challenging task of demonstrating their value to diverse stakeholders...
April 16, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29644722/using-machine-learning-to-advance-synthesis-and-use-of-conservation-and-environmental-evidence
#19
LETTER
S H Cheng, C Augustin, A Bethel, D Gill, S Anzaroot, J Brun, B DeWilde, R C Minnich, R Garside, Y J Masuda, D C Miller, D Wilkie, S Wongbusarakum, M C McKinnon
Rapid growth in environmental research (Li & Zhao 2015) presents a potential wealth of information for conservation decision-making. Evidence synthesis methods (e.g. systematic maps, reviews, meta-analyses) (Pullin & Knight 2009) are critical for garnering actionable insight from published research, yet come with high resource demands (time and funding) that are prohibitive for meeting short policy windows (Elliott et al. 2014) and balancing trade-offs between conservation planning and implementation...
April 12, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29604116/revisiting-the-promise-of-conservation-psychology
#20
Matthew J Selinske, Georgia E Garrard, Sarah A Bekessy, Ascelin Gordon, Alexander M Kusmanoff, Fiona Fidler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 31, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
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