journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28102907/global-lessons-from-successful-rhinoceros-conservation-in-nepal
#1
Achyut Aryal, Krishna Prasad Acharya, Uttam Babu Shrestha, Maheshwar Dhakal, David Raubenhiemer, Wendy Wright
Global populations of rhinoceros have declined alarmingly, from about 500,000 at the beginning of the 20(th) century to 29,000 in 2016, largely due to an escalation of poaching for rhinoceros horn (Traffic 2016; Biggs et al. 2013). The current global rhino population is comprised of three Asian Species and two African species, the latter located in South Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Namibia and Zimbabwe,. In Africa, the Southern white rhinoceros population is estimated at 20,700; and there are estimated to be around 4,885 black rhinoceros...
January 19, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092422/international-consensus-principles-for-ethical-wildlife-control
#2
Sara Dubois, Nicole Fenwick, Erin A Ryan, Liv Baker, Sandra E Baker, Ngaio J Beausoleil, Scott Carter, Barbara Cartwright, Federico Costa, Chris Draper, John Griffin, Adam Grogan, Gregg Howald, Bidda Jones, Kate E Littin, Amanda T Lombard, David J Mellor, Daniel Ramp, Catherine A Schuppli, David Fraser
Human-wildlife conflicts are commonly addressed by excluding, relocating, or lethally controlling animals with the goal of preserving public health and safety, protecting property, or conserving other valued wildlife. However, declining wildlife populations, a lack of efficacy of control methods in achieving desired outcomes, and changes in how people value animals have triggered widespread acknowledgment of the need for ethical and evidence-based approaches to managing such conflicts. We explored international perspectives on and experiences with human-wildlife conflicts to develop principles for ethical wildlife control...
January 16, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079282/troubling-issues-at-the-frontier-of-animal-tracking-for-conservation-and-management
#3
Steven J Cooke, Vivian M Nguyen, Steven T Kessel, Nigel E Hussey, Nathan Young, Adam T Ford
Developments in electronic tagging and tracking, including biotelemetry and biologging, have provided unprecedented insight into the ecology of wild animals (Cooke et al. 2004) and revealed hidden movement patterns, habitat associations, animal-environment interactions, and mortality rates for even the most cryptic of species (Hussey et al. 2015; Kays et al. 2015). Natural history, ecology (including movement ecology), conservation, and resource management have all benefitted from the application of this technology...
January 12, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28075039/using-dna-barcoding-to-track-seafood-mislabeling-in-los-angeles-restaurants
#4
Demian A Willette, Sara E Simmonds, Samantha H Cheng, Sofia Esteves, Tonya L Kane, Hayley Nuetzel, Nicholas Pilaud, Rita Rachmawati, Paul H Barber
Seafood mislabeling is common in both domestic and international markets. Previous studies on seafood fraud often report high rates of mislabeling (e.g. >70%), but these studies have been limited to a single sampling year, making it difficult to assess the impact of stricter governmental truth-in-labeling regulations. This study uses DNA barcoding to assess seafood mislabeling in Los Angeles over a four-year period. Sushi restaurants had a consistently high percentage of mislabeling (47%) from 2012 to 2015, yet mislabeling was not homogenous across species...
January 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074624/assessing-the-sustainability-of-waiwai-subsistence-hunting-in-guyana-with-implications-for-co-management-in-amazonian-indigenous-reserves
#5
Christopher A Shaffer, Marissa S Milstein, Charakura Yukuma, Elisha Marawanaru, Phillip Suse
While hunting is a key component of the subsistence strategies of many Amazonians, it is also one of the most important threats to wildlife conservation throughout South America. As indigenous reserves now make up more than 20% of Amazonia, effective conservation often requires working closely with indigenous groups as shared stakeholders in the management of hunting. We present a novel approach to co-management that integrates hunter generated harvesting data with spatially explicit, biodemographic modeling to assess the sustainability of the subsistence hunting of indigenous Waiwai in Guyana...
January 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074559/effects-of-traffic-noise-on-tree-frog-stress-levels-immunity-and-color-signaling
#6
Mathieu Troïanowski, Nathalie Mondy, Adeline Dumet, Caroline Arcanjo, Thierry Lengagne
During the last decade, many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of noise pollution on acoustic communication. Surprisingly, while it is known that noise exposure strongly influences health in humans, studies on wildlife remain scarce. In order to gain insight into the consequences of traffic noise exposure, we experimentally manipulated traffic noise exposure as well as the endocrine status of animals to investigate physiological and phenotypic consequences of noise pollution in an anuran species...
January 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074500/level-of-environmental-threat-posed-by-horticultural-trade-in-cactaceae
#7
Ana Novoa, Johannes J Le Roux, David M Richardson, John R U Wilson
Ornamental horticulture has been identified as an important threat to plant biodiversity and the major pathway for plant invasions worldwide. In this context, the family Cactaceae is particularly interesting and challenging for three main reasons-it is considered the fifth most threatened major taxonomic group in the world; several cactus species are amongst the most widespread and damaging invasive species; and Cactaceae is one of the most popular horticultural plant groups. Based on CITES trade data and the eleven main auction sites selling cacti on the internet we document a substantial global trade from and to almost all continents...
January 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042667/the-difficulties-of-systematic-reviews
#8
REVIEW
Martin J Westgate, David B Lindenmayer
The need for robust evidence to support conservation actions has driven the adoption of systematic approaches to research synthesis in ecology. However, applying systematic review to complex or open questions remains challenging, and this task is becoming more difficult as the quantity of scientific literature increases. Here, we draw on the science of linguistics for guidance as to why the process of identifying and sorting information during systematic review remains so labor-intensive, and to provide potential solutions...
January 2, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27995662/effects-of-preference-heterogeneity-among-landowners-on-spatial-conservation-prioritization
#9
Anne Sofie Elberg Nielsen, Niels Strange, Hans Henrik Bruun, Jette Bredahl Jacobsen
The participation of private landowners in conservation is crucial to efficient biodiversity conservation. This is especially the case in settings where the share of private ownership is large and the economic costs associated with the public land acquisition are high. We examine the revealed participation choice of Danish forest owners in a voluntary conservation program, and use the results to spatially predict the likelihood of participation for the full population of Danish forest owners. The outcome is included in a probability model for species survival...
December 20, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27991681/assessing-the-shelf-life-of-cost-efficient-conservation-plans-in-canada-s-farmland
#10
Cassandra M Robillard, Jeremy T Kerr
High conservation costs within agricultural regions warrant spatial prioritization approaches that explicitly consider land prices, to produce reserve sets that accomplish targets efficiently. However, land use changes within these regions, and delays between plan design and implementation, may render optimized plans obsolete before implementation occurs. An initiative to acquire and restore habitat for species at risk in Canada's farmland was simulated to measure the shelf-life of cost-efficient conservation plans, given observed changes in land acquisition costs and in agricultural intensity from Censuses of Agriculture from 1986 to 2011...
December 19, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27982493/control-of-invasive-rats-on-islands-and-priorities-for-future-action
#11
REVIEW
Quiterie Duron, Aaron B Shiels, Eric Vidal
Invasive rats are one of the world's most successful animal groups that cause native species extinctions and ecosystem change, particularly on islands. On large islands, rat eradication is often impossible and population control, defined as the local limitation of rat abundance, is now "routinely" performed on many of the world's islands as an alternative restoration tool. However, a synthesis including the various motivations, techniques, costs, and success levels from such rat control projects is lacking...
December 16, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27982481/consistency-of-effects-of-tropical-forest-disturbance-on-species-composition-and-richness-relative-to-use-of-indicator-taxa
#12
N E Stork, D S Srivastava, P Eggleton, M Hodda, G Lawson, R R B Leakey, A D Watt
A citation-classic study published almost twenty years ago found that the species richness of eight taxa each responded differently to anthropogenic disturbance in Cameroon forests. Recent developments in conservation biology suggest that net number of species is an insensitive measure of change and that understanding which species are affected by disturbance is more important. In addition, it is recognized that all disturbance types are not equal in their effect on species and that grouping species according to function rather than taxonomy is more informative of responses of biodiversity to change...
December 16, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976422/desert-pastoralists-negative-and-positive-effects-on-rare-wildlife-in-the-gobi
#13
REVIEW
L Stefan Ekernas, Wesley M Sarmento, Hannah S Davie, Richard P Reading, James Murdoch, Ganchimeg J Wingard, Sukh Amgalanbaatar, Joel Berger
In arid regions of the developing world, pastoralists and livestock commonly inhabit protected areas, resulting in human-wildlife conflict. Conflict is inextricably linked to the ecological processes shaping relationships between pastoralists and native herbivores and carnivores. To elucidate relationships underpinning human-wildlife conflict, we synthesized 15 years of ecological and ethnographic data from Ikh Nart Nature Reserve in Mongolia's Gobi steppe. The density of argali (Ovis ammon), the world's largest wild sheep, at Ikh Nart was among the highest in Mongolia, yet livestock were >90% of ungulate biomass and dogs >90% of large-carnivore biomass...
December 15, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976421/trait-based-prediction-of-extinction-risk-of-small-bodied-freshwater-fishes
#14
R Keller Kopf, Casey Shaw, Paul Humphries
Small body size is generally correlated with r-selected life-history traits, including early maturation, short generation times, and rapid growth rates, that result in high population turnover and a reduced risk of extinction. Unlike other classes of vertebrates, however, small freshwater fishes appear to have an equal or greater risk of extinction than large fishes. We explored whether particular traits explain the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List conservation status of small-bodied freshwater fishes from 4 temperate river basins: Murray-Darling, Australia; Danube, Europe; Mississippi-Missouri, North America; and the Rio Grande, North America...
December 15, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27958641/towards-accurate-and-precise-estimates-of-lion-density
#15
Nicholas B Elliot, Arjun M Gopalaswamy
Reliable estimates of animal density are fundamental to our understanding of ecological processes and population dynamics. Furthermore, their accuracy is vital to conservation biology since wildlife authorities rely on these figures to make decisions. However, it is notoriously difficult to accurately estimate density for wide-ranging species such as carnivores that occur at low densities. In recent years, significant progress has been made in density estimation of Asian carnivores, but the methods have not been widely adapted to African carnivores...
December 13, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27943504/phenological-mismatch-and-the-effectiveness-of-assisted-gene-flow
#16
Susana M Wadgymar, Arthur E Weis
The persistence of narrowly adapted species faced with climate change will depend on their ability to migrate apace with their historical climatic envelope or to adapt in place to maintain fitness. This second path to persistence can only occur if there is sufficient genetic variance for response to new selection regimes. Inadequate levels of genetic variation can be remedied by the conservation strategy of Assisted Gene Flow (AGF), that is, the intentional introduction of individuals genetically adapted to localities with historic climates similar to the current or future climate experienced by the resident population...
December 10, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27943463/use-of-demand-and-spatial-flow-in-prioritizing-areas-for-ecosystem-services
#17
Willem Verhagen, Aija S Kukkala, Atte Moilanen, Astrid J A van Teeffelen, Peter H Verburg
Policies and research increasingly focus on the protection of ecosystem services (ESs) through priority areas. Priority areas for ESs should be identified based on both ES capacity and ES demand while accounting for the flow zones between areas of ES capacity and ES demand. Here we tested ways to account for ES demand and flow zones to identify priority areas in the European Union. We mapped the capacity and demand of a global flow (carbon sequestration), a regional flow (flood regulation) and three local flow services (air quality, pollination and urban leisure)...
December 10, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27943401/fixism-and-conservation-science
#18
REVIEW
Alexandre Robert, Colin Fontaine, Simon Veron, Anne-Christine Monnet, Marine Legrand, Joanne Clavel, Stéphane Chantepie, Denis Couvet, Frédéric Ducarme, Benoît Fontaine, Frédéric Jiguet, Isabelle le Viol, Jonathan Rolland, François Sarrazin, Céline Teplitsky, Maud Mouchet
The field of biodiversity conservation has recently been criticised as relying on a fixist view of the living world, in which existing species constitute the targets of conservation efforts and simultaneously static states of reference, which is in apparent disagreement with evolutionary dynamics. Here, we argue that the ethical and theoretical frameworks underlying conservation research are based on macro-evolutionary reference processes rather than fixed reference states. We show how current species, phylogenetic, community and functional conservation approaches constitute short-term responses to short-term human effects on these reference processes, consistent with evolutionary principles...
December 10, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27925351/multispecies-genetic-objectives-in-spatial-conservation-planning
#19
Erica S Nielsen, Maria Beger, Romina Henriques, Kimberly A Selkoe, Sophie von der Heyden
The growing threats to biodiversity and global alteration of habitats and species distributions make it increasingly necessary to consider evolutionary patterns in conservation decision-making. Yet there is no clear-cut guidance on how genetic features can be incorporated into conservation planning processes, with multiple molecular markers and several genetic metrics for each marker type to choose from. Genetic patterns also differ between species, but the potential trade-offs amongst genetic objectives for multiple species in conservation planning are currently understudied...
December 7, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27925315/social-preferences-for-the-design-of-biodiversity-offsets-for-shorebirds-in-australia
#20
Abbie A Rogers, Michael P Burton
Understanding the social acceptability of biodiversity offsets is important in order to properly design offset policy. This study used a discrete choice experiment to quantify preferences of the Australian people for a migratory shorebird offset, in the context of an oil and gas development. We used both current and prospective offset policy characteristics, with a view to informing future policy design of the social dimensions related to offset acceptability. We found that the practice of offsetting was accepted by the community as a means to allow economic development...
December 7, 2016: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
journal
journal
33876
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"