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Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425128/understanding-the-effects-of-different-social-data-on-selecting-priority-conservation-areas
#1
Azadeh Karimi, Ayesha I T Tulloch, Greg Brown, Marc Hockings
Conservation success is contingent on assessing social as well as environmental factors so that cost-effective implementation of strategies and actions can be placed in a broad social-ecological context. Until now, the focus has been on how to include spatially-explicit social data in conservation planning, whereas the value of different kinds of social data has received limited attention. In a regional systematic conservation planning case study in Australia, we examined the spatial concurrence of a range of spatially-explicit social values and preferences collected using public participation GIS (PPGIS) methods with biological data...
April 20, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399327/problems-with-reductive-polygon-based-methods-for-estimating-species-ranges-reply-to-pimm-et%C3%A2-al-2017
#2
A Townsend Peterson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399326/unfulfilled-promise-of-data-driven-approaches-response-to-peterson-et%C3%A2-al
#3
Stuart L Pimm, Grant Harris, Clinton N Jenkins, Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela, Binbin V Li
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 11, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28384391/trends-in-anecdotal-fox-sightings-in-tasmania-accounted-for-by-psychological-factors
#4
Clive A Marks, Malcolm Clark, David Obendorf, Graham P Hall, Inês Soares, Filipe Pereira
There has been little evaluation of anecdotal sightings as a means to confirm new incursions of invasive species. This paper explores the potential for equivocal information communicated by the media to account for patterns of anecdotal reports. In 2001 it was widely reported that red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) had been deliberately released in the island state of Tasmania (Australia), although this claim was later revealed to be baseless. Regardless, by 2013 a total of 3153 anecdotal fox sightings had been reported by members of the public and this implied the wide distribution of foxes...
April 6, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383758/applying-network-theory-to-prioritize-multi-species-habitat-networks-that-are-robust-to-climate-and-land-use-change
#5
Cécile H Albert, Bronwyn Rayfield, Maria Dumitru, Andrew Gonzalez
Designing connected landscapes is among the most widespread strategies for achieving biodiversity conservation targets. The challenge lies in simultaneously satisfying the connectivity needs of multiple species at multiple spatial scales under uncertain climate and land-use change. To evaluate the contribution of remnant habitat fragments to the connectivity of regional habitat networks, we develop a framework integrating uncertainty in climate and land-use change projections with the latest developments in network connectivity research and spatial, multi-purpose conservation prioritization...
April 6, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370469/need-for-conservation-planning-in-postconflict-colombia
#6
LETTER
Pablo Jose Negret, James Allan, Alexander Braczkowski, Martine Maron, James E M Watson
More than 80% of recent major armed conflicts have taken place in biodiversity hotspots, including the Tropical Andes which is home to the world's highest concentrations of bird, mammal, and amphibian species and over 10% of all vascular plant species (Mittermeier et al. 2004; Hanson et al. 2009). Armed conflicts not only seriously impact social and political systems but also have large effects on biodiversity from the time preparations for conflict start through the period of social reorganization (Machlis & Hanson 2008) (hereafter postconflict period)...
April 3, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370371/a-critical-evaluation-of-the-historical-fire-regime-concept-in-conservation
#7
REVIEW
Johanna Freeman, Leda Kobziar, Elizabeth White Rose, Wendell Cropper
Prescribed fire has gained widespread acceptance as a conservation tool, due to the recognition that fire is a process essential to the maintenance of native biodiversity in many terrestrial communities. Approaches to developing fire prescriptions vary greatly between continents, but scientists and practitioners stand to benefit from knowledge sharing across world regions. In North America, decisions about how and when to apply prescribed fire are typically based on the historical fire regime concept (HFRC), which holds that replicating the pattern of fires ignited by lightning and/or pre-industrial humans will best promote native species in fire-prone regions...
March 31, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370297/a-condition-metric-for-eucalyptus-woodland-derived-from-expert-evaluations
#8
Steve J Sinclair, Matthew J Bruce, Peter Griffioen, Amanda Dodd, Matthew D White
The evaluation of ecosystem quality is important for land management and land-use planning. Evaluation is unavoidably subjective, and robust metrics must be based on consensus and the structured use of observations. This paper presents a means of building and testing metrics based on expert evaluation data, using a transparent and repeatable process. We gather quantitative evaluation data from a defined expert group, about the quality of synthetic (fictional) grassy woodland sites. We use these data to train a model (an ensemble of thirty bagged regression trees) capable of predicting the perceived quality of similar synthetic woodlands using a set of thirteen site variables as inputs...
March 31, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370319/historical-spatial-reconstruction-of-a-spawning-aggregation-fishery
#9
Sarah M Buckley, Ruth H Thurstan, Andrew Tobin, John M Pandolfi
Aggregations forming for breeding are a critical ecological process for many species, yet these aggregations are also inherently vulnerable to exploitation. Documenting the decline of exploited populations that form breeding aggregations is becoming increasingly common, but studies tend to focus upon catch rate, often overlooking reductions in geographic range. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that catch rate and occupancy of exploited fish spawning aggregations (FSAs) decline in synchrony over time...
March 29, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339135/integrated-models-to-support-multiobjective-ecological-restoration-decisions
#10
Hannah Fraser, Libby Rumpff, Jian D L Yen, Doug Robinson, Brendan A Wintle
Many objectives motivate ecological restoration including improving vegetation condition, increasing the range and abundance of threatened species, and improving aggregate measures of biodiversity such as richness and diversity. While ecological models have been used to examine the outcomes of ecological restoration, there are few attempts to develop models to account for multiple, potentially competing objectives. We develop the first predictive model that integrates a vegetation-focused state-and-transition model with species distribution models for birds...
March 24, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339121/connecting-today-s-climates-to-future-analogs-to-facilitate-species-movement-under-climate-change
#11
Caitlin E Littlefield, Brad H McRae, Julia Michalak, Joshua J Lawler, Carlos Carroll
Increasing connectivity is an important strategy for facilitating species range shifts and maintaining biodiversity in the face of climate change. To date, however, few studies have included future climate projections in efforts to prioritize areas for increasing connectivity. Here, we identify key areas likely to facilitate climate-induced species movement across western North America. Using historical climate datasets and future climate projections, we mapped potential routes between current climates and their future analogs with a novel moving-window analysis based on electrical circuit theory...
March 24, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28328146/conservation-and-the-four-rs-which-are-rescue-rehabilitation-release-and-research
#12
REVIEW
Graham H Pyke, Judit K Szabo
Vertebrate animals can be injured or threatened with injury through human activities, thus warranting their 'rescue'. Details of wildlife Rescue, Rehabilitation, Release, and associated Research (our 4 R's) are often recorded in large databases, resulting in a wealth of information. This information has huge research potential and can contribute to our understanding of animal biology, anthropogenic impacts on wildlife, and species conservation. However, such databases have been little used, few studies have evaluated factors influencing success of rehabilitation and/or release, recommended actions to conserve threatened species have rarely arisen, and direct benefits for species conservation are yet to be demonstrated...
March 22, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319283/critically-evaluating-best-management-practices-for-preventing-freshwater-turtle-extinctions
#13
R J Spencer, J U Van Dyke, Michael B Thompson
Ex situ conservation tools, such as captive breeding for reintroduction, are considered last resort to help recover threatened or endangered species. However, they may also provide alternative strategies where reducing threats directly is difficult or ineffective. Headstarting, or captive rearing of eggs or neonate animals and subsequent release into the wild, has been controversial for decades. A major criticism is that headstarting is a symptomatic treatment of conservation problems (halfway technology), however, it may provide a mechanism to address multiple threats, particularly in close proximity of population centres...
March 20, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295579/estimating-freshwater-turtle-mortality-rates-and-population-declines-following-hook-ingestion
#14
David A Steen, Orin J Robinson
Freshwater turtle populations are susceptible to declines following small increases in the mortality of adults, making it essential to identify and understand potential threats. Recent research has used x-ray technology to reveal that freshwater turtles ingest fish hooks associated with recreational angling; this is concerning because hook ingestion is a known source of additive mortality for sea turtles. We used a Bayesian-modeling framework, observed rates of freshwater turtle hook ingestion, and information from sea turtles to estimate there is a 1...
March 15, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295561/effects-of-national-level-forest-management-regimes-on-non-protected-forests-of-the-himalaya
#15
Jodi S Brandt, Teri Allendorf, Volker Radeloff, Jeremy Brooks
Globally, deforestation continues, and while protected areas are effective at protecting forests, the majority of forests are not in protected areas. This raises the question how effective are different management regimes to avoid deforestation in non-protected forests. Our objective was to assess the ability of different national-level forest management regimes to safeguard forests outside of protected areas. We compared 2000-2014 deforestation rates across the temperate forests of five countries in the Himalaya (Bhutan, Nepal, China, India, and Myanmar) of which only 13% are protected...
March 15, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28272844/performance-of-iucn-proxies-for-generation-length
#16
Han Chi Fung, Robin S Waples
One of the criteria used by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to assess threat status is the rate of decline in abundance over 3 generations or 10 years, whichever is longer. The traditional method for calculating generation length (T) uses age-specific survival and fecundity, but these data are rarely available. Consequently, proxies that require less information are often used, which introduces potential biases. The IUCN recommends 2 proxies based on adult mortality rate, T̂d = α + 1/d, and reproductive life span, T̂z = α + z(*) RL, where α is age at first reproduction, d is adult mortality rate, RL is reproductive life span, and z is a coefficient derived from data for comparable species...
March 8, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28272753/threats-to-intact-tropical-peatlands-and-opportunities-for-their-conservation
#17
K H Roucoux, I T Lawson, T R Baker, D Del Castillo Torres, F C Draper, O Lähteenoja, M P Gilmore, E N Honorio Coronado, T J Kelly, E T A Mitchard, C Vriesendorp
Large, intact areas of tropical peatland are highly threatened at a global scale by the expansion of commercial agriculture and other forms of economic development. Conserving peatlands on a landscape scale, with their hydrology intact, is of international conservation importance to preserve their distinctive biodiversity and ecosystem services, and maintain their resilience to future environmental change. Here, we explore the threats and opportunities for conserving remaining intact tropical peatlands. Our focus therefore largely excludes the peatlands of Indonesia and Malaysia, where extensive deforestation, drainage and conversion to plantation of peat swamp forests over the last few decades means that conservation efforts in this region are reduced to protecting small fragments of the original ecosystem, attempting to restore drained peatlands, or dissuading companies from expanding existing plantations...
March 8, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28248436/defining-ecologically-relevant-scales-for-spatial-protection-with-long-term-data-on-an-endangered-seabird-and-local-prey-availability
#18
Richard B Sherley, Philna Botha, Les G Underhill, Peter G Ryan, Danie van Zyl, Andrew C Cockcroft, Robert J M Crawford, Bruce M Dyer, Timothée R Cook
Human activities are important drivers of marine ecosystem functioning. However, separating the synergistic effects of fishing and environmental variability on the prey base of non-target predators is difficult, often because prey availability estimates on appropriate scales are lacking. Understanding how prey abundance at different spatial scales links to population change can help integrate the needs of non-target predators into fisheries management by defining ecologically-relevant areas for spatial protection...
March 1, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28248429/minimizing-species-extinctions-through-strategic-planning-for-conservation-fencing
#19
Jeremy L Ringma, Brendan Wintle, Richard A Fuller, Diana Fisher, Michael Bode
Conservation fences are an increasingly common management action, particularly for species threatened by invasive predators. However, unlike many conservation actions, fence networks are expanding in an unsystematic manner, generally as a reaction to local funding opportunities or threats. In a gap analysis of Australia's substantial predator exclusion fence network, we found highly uneven protection, with 67% of predator-sensitive species remaining unrepresented. Predator exclusion fences all contain small populations of threatened species, therefore a novel systematic prioritization method for expanding fence networks that explicitly incorporates population viability analysis and minimises expected species' extinctions was developed...
March 1, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28245067/conservation-genomics-of-the-endangered-burmese-roofed-turtle
#20
F Gözde Çilingir, Frank E Rheindt, Kritika M Garg, Kalyar Platt, Steven G Platt, David P Bickford
The Burmese roofed turtle (Batagur trivittata) is one of the world's most endangered turtles. Only one wild population remains in Myanmar. Based on field observations, wild breeders are thought to number around a dozen. Combined in-situ and ex-situ conservation efforts for the species have raised >700 captive turtles over a decade predominantly from wild collected eggs. In one of the most comprehensive studies bridging genomic methodologies with active in-situ and ex-situ conservation efforts, we obtained ∼1500 unlinked genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from ∼40% of the turtles' remaining global population...
February 28, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
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