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Developmental Science

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523758/iconicity-in-the-speech-of-children-and-adults
#1
Lynn K Perry, Marcus Perlman, Bodo Winter, Dominic W Massaro, Gary Lupyan
Iconicity - the correspondence between form and meaning - may help young children learn to use new words. Early-learned words are higher in iconicity than later learned words. However, it remains unclear what role iconicity may play in actual language use. Here, we ask whether iconicity relates not just to the age at which words are acquired, but also to how frequently children and adults use the words in their speech. If iconicity serves to bootstrap word learning, then we would expect that children should say highly iconic words more frequently than less iconic words, especially early in development...
May 18, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523733/the-development-of-cognitive-empathy-and-concern-in-preschool-children-a-behavioral-neuroscience-investigation
#2
Jean Decety, Kimberly L Meidenbauer, Jason M Cowell
This developmental neuroscience study examined the electrophysiological responses (EEG and ERPs) associated with perspective taking and empathic concern in preschool children, as well as their relation to parental empathy dispositions and children's own prosocial behavior. Consistent with a body of previous studies using stimuli depicting somatic pain in both children and adults, larger early (~200 ms) ERPs were identified when perceiving painful versus neutral stimuli. In the slow wave window (~800 ms), a significant interaction of empathy condition and stimulus type was driven by a greater difference between painful and neutral images in the empathic concern condition...
May 18, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503845/the-specificity-of-the-neural-response-to-speech-at-birth
#3
Lillian May, Judit Gervain, Manuel Carreiras, Janet F Werker
In this work we ask whether at birth, the human brain responds uniquely to speech, or if similar activation also occurs to a non-speech surrogate 'language'. We compare neural activation in newborn infants to the language heard in utero (English), to an unfamiliar language (Spanish), and to a whistled surrogate language (Silbo Gomero) that, while used by humans to communicate, is not speech. Anterior temporal areas of the neonate cortex are activated in response to both familiar and unfamiliar spoken language, but these classic language areas are not activated to the whistled surrogate form...
May 15, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497524/changing-minds-children-s-inferences-about-third-party-belief-revision
#4
Rachel W Magid, Phyllis Yan, Max H Siegel, Joshua B Tenenbaum, Laura E Schulz
By the age of 5, children explicitly represent that agents can have both true and false beliefs based on epistemic access to information (e.g., Wellman, Cross, & Watson, 2001). Children also begin to understand that agents can view identical evidence and draw different inferences from it (e.g., Carpendale & Chandler, 1996). However, much less is known about when, and under what conditions, children expect other agents to change their minds. Here, inspired by formal ideal observer models of learning, we investigate children's expectations of the dynamics that underlie third parties' belief revision...
May 12, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497512/children-s-intuitive-sense-of-number-develops-independently-of-their-perception-of-area-density-length-and-time
#5
Darko Odic
Young children can quickly and intuitively represent the number of objects in a visual scene through the Approximate Number System (ANS). The precision of the ANS - indexed as the most difficult ratio of two numbers that children can reliably discriminate - is well known to improve with development: whereas infants require relatively large ratios to discriminate number, children can discriminate finer and finer changes in number between toddlerhood and early adulthood. Which factors drive the developmental improvements in ANS precision? Here, we investigate the influence of four non-numeric dimensions - area, density, line length, and time - on ANS development, exploring the degree to which the ANS develops independently from these other dimensions, from inhibitory control, and from domain-general factors such as attention and working memory that are shared between these tasks...
May 12, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28470820/semantic-richness-and-word-learning-in-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorder
#6
Allison Gladfelter, Lisa Goffman
Semantically rich learning contexts facilitate semantic, phonological, and articulatory aspects of word learning in children with typical development (TD). However, because children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show differences at each of these processing levels, it is unclear whether they will benefit from semantic cues in the same manner as their typical peers. The goal of this study was to track how the inclusion of rich, sparse, or no semantic cues influences semantic, phonological, and articulatory aspects of word learning in children with ASD and TD over time...
May 4, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464437/relationship-between-sports-experience-and-executive-function-in-6-12-year-old-children-independence-from-physical-fitness-and-moderation-by-gender
#7
Toru Ishihara, Shigemi Sugasawa, Yusuke Matsuda, Masao Mizuno
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sports experience (i.e., tennis experience) and executive function in children while controlling for physical activity and physical fitness. Sixty-eight participants (6-12 years old, 34 males and 34 females) were enrolled in regular tennis lessons (mean = 2.4 years, range = 0.1-7.3 years) prior to the study. Executive functions, including inhibitory control (the Stroop Color-Word Test), working memory (the 2-back Task), and cognitive flexibility (the Local-global Task) were evaluated...
May 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464381/socioeconomic-status-and-hippocampal-volume-in-children-and-young-adults
#8
Qijing Yu, Ana M Daugherty, Dana M Anderson, Mayu Nishimura, David Brush, Amanda Hardwick, William Lacey, Sarah Raz, Noa Ofen
An individual's socioeconomic status (SES) is often viewed as a proxy for a host of environmental influences. SES disparities have been linked to variance in brain structures particularly the hippocampus, a neural substrate of learning and memory. However, it is unclear whether the association between SES and hippocampal volume is similar in children and adults. We investigated the relationship between hippocampal volume and SES in a group of children (n = 31, age 8-12 years) and a group of young adults (n = 32, age 18-25 years)...
May 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28447388/incidental-learning-in-a-multisensory-environment-across-childhood
#9
Hannah J Broadbent, Hayley White, Denis Mareschal, Natasha Z Kirkham
Multisensory information has been shown to modulate attention in infants and facilitate learning in adults, by enhancing the amodal properties of a stimulus. However, it remains unclear whether this translates to learning in a multisensory environment across middle childhood, and particularly in the case of incidental learning. One hundred and eighty-one children aged between 6 and 10 years participated in this study using a novel Multisensory Attention Learning Task (MALT). Participants were asked to respond to the presence of a target stimulus whilst ignoring distractors...
April 26, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28440058/atypical-inter-hemispheric-communication-correlates-with-altered-motor-inhibition-during-learning-of-a-new-bimanual-coordination-pattern-in-developmental-coordination-disorder
#10
Mélody Blais, David Amarantini, Jean-Michel Albaret, Yves Chaix, Jessica Tallet
Impairment of motor learning skills in developmental coordination disorder (DCD) has been reported in several studies. Some hypotheses on neural mechanisms of motor learning deficits in DCD have emerged but, to date, brain-imaging investigations are scarce. The aim of the present study is to assess possible changes in communication between brain areas during practice of a new bimanual coordination task in teenagers with DCD (n = 10) compared to matched controls (n = 10). Accuracy, stability and number of mirror movements were computed as behavioural variables...
April 25, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28382759/development-of-infant-sustained-attention-and-its-relation-to-eeg-oscillations-an-eeg-and-cortical-source-analysis-study
#11
Wanze Xie, Brittany M Mallin, John E Richards
The current study examined the relation between infant sustained attention and infant EEG oscillations. Fifty-nine infants were tested at 6 (N = 15), 8 (N = 17), 10 (N = 14), and 12 (N = 13) months. Three attention phases, stimulus orienting, sustained attention, and attention termination, were defined based on infants' heart rate changes. Frequency analysis using simultaneously recorded EEG focused on infant theta (2-6 Hz), alpha (6-9 Hz), and beta (9-14 Hz) rhythms. Cortical source analysis of EEG oscillations was conducted with realistic infant MRI models...
April 5, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326654/the-development-of-bodily-self-consciousness-changing-responses-to-the-full-body-illusion-in-childhood
#12
Dorothy Cowie, Aisling McKenna, Andrew J Bremner, Jane E Aspell
The present work investigates the development of bodily self-consciousness and its relation to multisensory bodily information, by measuring for the first time the development of responses to the full body illusion in childhood. We tested three age groups of children: 6- to 7-year-olds (n = 28); 8- to 9-year-olds (n = 21); 10- to 11-year-olds (n = 19), and a group of adults (n = 31). Each participant wore a head-mounted display (HMD) which displayed a view from a video camera positioned 2 metres behind their own back...
March 22, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295917/gaze-based-rehearsal-in-children-under-7-a-developmental-investigation-of-eye-movements-during-a-serial-spatial-memory-task
#13
Candice C Morey, Silvana Mareva, Jaroslaw R Lelonkiewicz, Nicolas Chevalier
The emergence of strategic verbal rehearsal at around 7 years of age is widely considered a major milestone in descriptions of the development of short-term memory across childhood. Likewise, rehearsal is believed by many to be a crucial factor in explaining why memory improves with age. This apparent qualitative shift in mnemonic processes has also been characterized as a shift from passive visual to more active verbal mnemonic strategy use, but no investigation of the development of overt spatial rehearsal has informed this explanation...
March 12, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295877/neuroscientific-insights-into-the-development-of-analogical-reasoning
#14
Kirstie J Whitaker, Michael S Vendetti, Carter Wendelken, Silvia A Bunge
Analogical reasoning, or the ability to find correspondences between entities based on shared relationships, supports knowledge acquisition. As such, the development of this ability during childhood is thought to promote learning. Here, we sought to better understand the mechanisms by which analogical reasoning about semantic relations improves over childhood and adolescence (e.g. chalk is to chalkboard as pen is to…?). We hypothesized that age-related differences would manifest as differences in the brain regions associated with one or more of the following cognitive functions: (1) controlled semantic retrieval, or the ability to retrieve task-relevant semantic associations; (2) response control, or the ability to override the tendency to respond to a salient distractor; and/or (3) relational integration, or the ability to consider jointly two mental relations...
March 12, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295866/mapping-language-to-the-world-the-role-of-iconicity-in-the-sign-language-input
#15
Pamela Perniss, Jenny C Lu, Gary Morgan, Gabriella Vigliocco
Most research on the mechanisms underlying referential mapping has assumed that learning occurs in ostensive contexts, where label and referent co-occur, and that form and meaning are linked by arbitrary convention alone. In the present study, we focus on iconicity in language, that is, resemblance relationships between form and meaning, and on non-ostensive contexts, where label and referent do not co-occur. We approach the question of language learning from the perspective of the language input. Specifically, we look at child-directed language (CDL) in British Sign Language (BSL), a language rich in iconicity due to the affordances of the visual modality...
March 12, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256036/neuroanatomical-correlates-of-performance-in-a-state-wide-test-of-math-achievement
#16
Eric D Wilkey, Laurie E Cutting, Gavin R Price
The development of math skills is a critical component of early education and a strong indicator of later school and economic success. Recent research utilizing population-normed, standardized measures of math achievement suggest that structural and functional integrity of parietal regions, especially the intraparietal sulcus, are closely related to the development of math skills. However, it is unknown how these findings relate to in-school math learning. The present study is the first to address this issue by investigating the relationship between regional differences in grey matter (GM) volume and performance in grade-level mathematics as measured by a state-wide, school-based test of math achievement (TCAP math) in children from 3rd to 8th grade...
March 3, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256107/peripheral-and-central-contribution-to-the-difficulty-of-speech-in-noise-perception-in-dyslexic-children
#17
Axelle Calcus, Paul Deltenre, Cécile Colin, Régine Kolinsky
Noise typically induces both peripheral and central masking of an auditory target. Whereas the idea that a deficit of speech in noise perception is inherent to dyslexia is still debated, most studies have actually focused on the peripheral contribution to the dyslexics' difficulties of perceiving speech in noise. Here, we investigated the respective contribution of both peripheral and central noise in three groups of children: dyslexic, chronological age matched controls (CA), and reading-level matched controls (RL)...
March 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256101/the-procedural-learning-deficit-hypothesis-of-language-learning-disorders-we-see-some-problems
#18
Gillian West, Miguel A Vadillo, David R Shanks, Charles Hulme
Impaired procedural learning has been suggested as a possible cause of developmental dyslexia (DD) and specific language impairment (SLI). This study examined the relationship between measures of verbal and non-verbal implicit and explicit learning and measures of language, literacy and arithmetic attainment in a large sample of 7 to 8-year-old children. Measures of verbal explicit learning were correlated with measures of attainment. In contrast, no relationships between measures of implicit learning and attainment were found...
March 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256097/the-ontogeny-of-relational-memory-and-pattern-separation
#19
Chi T Ngo, Nora S Newcombe, Ingrid R Olson
Episodic memory relies on memory for the relations among multiple elements of an event and the ability to discriminate among similar elements of episodes. The latter phenomenon, termed pattern separation, has been studied mainly in young and older adults with relatively little research on children. Building on prior work with young children, we created an engaging computer-administered relational memory task assessing what-where relations. We also modified the Mnemonic Similarity Task used to assess pattern discrimination in young and older adults for use with preschool children...
March 2, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256035/tracking-independence-and-merging-of-prosodic-and-phonemic-processing-across-infancy
#20
Angelika Becker, Ulrike Schild, Claudia K Friedrich
Recent evidence suggests division of labor in phonological analysis underlying speech recognition. Adults and children appear to decompose the speech stream into phoneme-relevant information and into syllable stress. Here we investigate whether both speech processing streams develop from a common path in infancy, or whether there are two separate streams from early on. We presented stressed and unstressed syllables (spoken primes) followed by initially stressed early learned disyllabic German words (spoken targets)...
March 2, 2017: Developmental Science
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