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Animal Cognition

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28634675/wild-capuchin-monkeys-anticipate-the-amount-of-ripe-fruit-in-natural-trees
#1
María Paula Tujague, Charles H Janson
Tropical forests have a high diversity of tree species which have very low densities and vary across time in their seasons of peak fruiting and maturation rates. As evidence of the ability of primates to track or anticipate changes in fruit production at individual trees, researchers have used the increased speed of primate groups toward more rewarding food patches. We analyzed the speed of approach to natural trees of wild capuchin monkeys under the effect of scramble competition, after excluding any plausible visual, olfactory and auditory cues...
June 20, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620776/quantity-discrimination-in-angelfish-pterophyllum-scalare-is-maintained-after-a-30-s-retention-interval-in-the-large-but-not-in-the-small-number-range
#2
Luis M Gómez-Laplaza, Álvaro L Caicoya, Robert Gerlai
The ability to discriminate between sets that differ in the number of elements can be useful in different contexts and may have survival and fitness consequences. As such, numerical/quantity discrimination has been demonstrated in a diversity of animal species. In the laboratory, this ability has been analyzed, for example, using binary choice tests. Furthermore, when the different number of items first presented to the subjects are subsequently obscured, i.e., are not visible at the moment of making a choice, the task requires memory for the size of the sets...
June 15, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616841/zebrafish-prefer-larger-to-smaller-shoals-analysis-of-quantity-estimation-in-a-genetically-tractable-model-organism
#3
Diane Seguin, Robert Gerlai
Numerical abilities have been demonstrated in a variety of non-human vertebrates. However, underlying biological mechanisms have been difficult to study due to a paucity of experimental tools. Powerful genetic and neurobiological tools already exist for the zebrafish, but numerical abilities remain scarcely explored with this species. Here, we investigate the choice made by single experimental zebrafish between numerically different shoals of conspecifics presented concurrently on opposite sides of the experimental tank...
June 14, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600681/responses-to-familiar-and-unfamiliar-objects-by-belugas-delphinapterus-leucas-bottlenose-dolphins-tursiops-truncatus-and-pacific-white-sided-dolphins-lagenorhynchus-obliquidens
#4
Sara Guarino, Deirdre Yeater, Steve Lacy, Tricia Dees, Heather M Hill
Previous research with bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) demonstrated their ability to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar stimuli. Dolphins gazed longer at unfamiliar stimuli. The current study attempted to extend this original research by examining the responses of three species of cetaceans to objects that differed in familiarity. Eleven belugas from two facilities, five bottlenose dolphins and five Pacific white-sided dolphins housed at one facility were presented different objects in a free-swim scenario...
June 9, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577256/dominance-and-social-information-use-in-a-lizard
#5
Fonti Kar, Martin J Whiting, Daniel W A Noble
There is mounting evidence that social learning is not just restricted to group-living animals, but also occurs in species with a wide range of social systems. However, we still have a poor understanding of the factors driving individual differences in social information use. We investigated the effects of relative dominance on social information use in the eastern water skink (Eulamprus quoyii), a species with age-dependent social learning. We used staged contests to establish dominant-subordinate relationships in pairs of lizards and tested whether observers use social information to more quickly solve both an association and reversal learning task in situations where the demonstrator was either dominant or subordinate...
June 2, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540504/can-but-don-t-olfactory-discrimination-between-own-and-alien-offspring-in-the-domestic-cat
#6
Oxána Bánszegi, Elisa Jacinto, Andrea Urrutia, Péter Szenczi, Robyn Hudson
Mammalian maternal care usually comes at a large energetic cost. To maximize their fitness, mothers should preferentially care for their own offspring. However, the majority of studies of mother-offspring recognition have focused on herd- or colony-living species and there is little information on maternal discrimination in more solitary-living species. Olfaction has been found to play a major role in mother-offspring recognition across various taxa. Therefore, our aim was to study this in a species evolved from a solitary-living ancestor, the domestic cat...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28536954/sex-differences-in-dogs-social-learning-of-spatial-information
#7
Claudia Fugazza, Paolo Mongillo, Lieta Marinelli
We used a modified version of the Do as I Do paradigm to investigate dogs' preference and flexibility in the acquisition of different types of spatial information in social learning situations. When required to match the location of the demonstration, dogs (N = 16) preferentially relied on allocentric information, i.e., the relationship between the location of the demonstration and the various objects surrounding it. However, when allocentric cues were inadequate to solve the task, dogs learned to rely on egocentric information, i...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508126/what-s-the-point-golden-and-labrador-retrievers-living-in-kennels-do-not-understand-human-pointing-gestures
#8
Biagio D'Aniello, Alessandra Alterisio, Anna Scandurra, Emanuele Petremolo, Maria Rosaria Iommelli, Massimo Aria
In many studies that have investigated whether dogs' capacities to understand human pointing gestures are aspects of evolutionary or developmental social competences, family-owned dogs have been compared to shelter dogs. However, for most of these studies, the origins of shelter dogs were unknown. Some shelter dogs may have lived with families before entering shelters, and from these past experiences, they may have learned to understand human gestures. Furthermore, there is substantial variation in the methodology and analytic approaches used in such studies (e...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508125/judgement-bias-in-pigs-is-independent-of-performance-in-a-spatial-holeboard-task-and-conditional-discrimination-learning
#9
Sanne Roelofs, Eimear Murphy, Haifang Ni, Elise Gieling, Rebecca E Nordquist, F Josef van der Staay
Biases in judgement of ambiguous stimuli, as measured in a judgement bias task, have been proposed as a measure of the valence of affective states in animals. We recently suggested a list of criteria for behavioural tests of emotion, one of them stating that responses on the task used to assess emotionality should not be confounded by, among others, differences in learning capacity, i.e. must not simply reflect the cognitive capacity of an animal. We performed three independent studies in which pigs acquired a spatial holeboard task, a free choice maze which simultaneously assesses working memory and reference memory...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502063/great-ape-gestures-intentional-communication-with-a-rich-set-of-innate-signals
#10
R W Byrne, E Cartmill, E Genty, K E Graham, C Hobaiter, J Tanner
Great apes give gestures deliberately and voluntarily, in order to influence particular target audiences, whose direction of attention they take into account when choosing which type of gesture to use. These facts make the study of ape gesture directly relevant to understanding the evolutionary precursors of human language; here we present an assessment of ape gesture from that perspective, focusing on the work of the "St Andrews Group" of researchers. Intended meanings of ape gestures are relatively few and simple...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28492975/practice-makes-perfect-familiarity-of-task-determines-success-in-solvable-tasks-for-free-ranging-dogs-canis-lupus-familiaris
#11
Debottam Bhattacharjee, Sandipan Dasgupta, Arpita Biswas, Jayshree Deheria, Shreya Gupta, N Nikhil Dev, Monique Udell, Anindita Bhadra
Domestic dogs' (Canis lupus familiaris) socio-cognitive faculties have made them highly sensitive to human social cues. While dogs often excel at understanding human communicative gestures, they perform comparatively poorly in problem-solving and physical reasoning tasks. This difference in their behaviour could be due to the lifestyle and intense socialization, where problem solving and physical cognition are less important than social cognition. Free-ranging dogs live in human-dominated environments, not under human supervision and are less socialized...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432495/investigating-emotional-contagion-in-dogs-canis-familiaris-to-emotional-sounds-of-humans-and-conspecifics
#12
Annika Huber, Anjuli L A Barber, Tamás Faragó, Corsin A Müller, Ludwig Huber
Emotional contagion, a basic component of empathy defined as emotional state-matching between individuals, has previously been shown in dogs even upon solely hearing negative emotional sounds of humans or conspecifics. The current investigation further sheds light on this phenomenon by directly contrasting emotional sounds of both species (humans and dogs) as well as opposed valences (positive and negative) to gain insights into intra- and interspecies empathy as well as differences between positively and negatively valenced sounds...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429096/differences-in-problem-solving-between-canid-populations-do-domestication-and-lifetime-experience-affect-persistence
#13
Lauren Brubaker, Sandipan Dasgupta, Debottam Bhattacharjee, Anindita Bhadra, Monique A R Udell
Past research has suggested that a variety of factors, phylogenetic and ontogenetic, play a role in how canines behave during problem-solving tasks and the degree to which the presence of a human influences their problem-solving behaviour. While comparisons between socialized wolves and domestic dogs have commonly been used to tease apart these predictive factors, in many cases a single dog population, often pets, have been used for these comparisons. Less is understood about how different populations of dogs may behave when compared with wolves, or with each other, during an independent problem-solving task...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429095/pigeons-columba-livia-show-change-blindness-in-a-color-change-detection-task
#14
Walter T Herbranson, Jacob S Jeffers
Change blindness is a phenomenon whereby changes to a stimulus are more likely go unnoticed under certain circumstances. Pigeons learned a change detection task, in which they observed sequential stimulus displays consisting of individual colors back-projected onto three response keys. The color of one response key changed during each sequence and pecks to the key that displayed the change were reinforced. Pigeons showed a change blindness effect, in that change detection accuracy was worse when there was an inter-stimulus interval interrupting the transition between consecutive stimulus displays...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421298/dog-rivalry-impacts-following-behavior-in-a-decision-making-task-involving-food
#15
Christy L Hoffman, Malini Suchak
Dogs learn a great deal from humans and other dogs. Previous studies of socially influenced learning between dogs have typically used a highly trained demonstrator dog who is unfamiliar to the observer. Because of this, it is unknown how dynamics between familiar dogs may influence their likelihood of learning from each other. In this study, we tested dogs living together in two-dog households on whether individual dogs' rivalry scores were associated with performance on a local enhancement task. Specifically, we wanted to know whether dog rivalry impacted whether an observer dog would approach a plate from which a demonstrator dog had eaten all available food, or whether the observer dog would approach the adjacent plate that still contained food...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28397005/sneaking-a-peek-pigeons-use-peripheral-vision-not-mirrors-to-find-hidden-food
#16
Emre Ünver, Alexis Garland, Sepideh Tabrik, Onur Güntürkün
A small number of species are capable of recognizing themselves in the mirror when tested with the mark-and-mirror test. This ability is often seen as evidence of self-recognition and possibly even self-awareness. Strangely, a number of species, for example monkeys, pigs and dogs, are unable to pass the mark test but can locate rewarding objects by using the reflective properties of a mirror. Thus, these species seem to understand how a visual reflection functions but cannot apply it to their own image. We tested this discrepancy in pigeons-a species that does not spontaneously pass the mark test...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393311/discrimination-of-acoustically-similar-conspecific-and-heterospecific-vocalizations-by-black-capped-chickadees-poecile-atricapillus
#17
Allison H Hahn, Kimberley A Campbell, Jenna V Congdon, John Hoang, Neil McMillan, Erin N Scully, Joshua J H Yong, Julie E Elie, Christopher B Sturdy
Chickadees produce a multi-note chick-a-dee call in multiple socially relevant contexts. One component of this call is the D note, which is a low-frequency and acoustically complex note with a harmonic-like structure. In the current study, we tested black-capped chickadees on a between-category operant discrimination task using vocalizations with acoustic structures similar to black-capped chickadee D notes, but produced by various songbird species, in order to examine the role that phylogenetic distance plays in acoustic perception of vocal signals...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391488/selective-auditory-grouping-by-zebra-finches-testing-the-iambic-trochaic-law
#18
Michelle Spierings, Jeroen Hubert, Carel Ten Cate
Humans have a strong tendency to spontaneously group visual or auditory stimuli together in larger patterns. One of these perceptual grouping biases is formulated as the iambic/trochaic law, where humans group successive tones alternating in pitch and intensity as trochees (high-low and loud-soft) and alternating in duration as iambs (short-long). The grouping of alternations in pitch and intensity into trochees is a human universal and is also present in one non-human animal species, rats. The perceptual grouping of sounds alternating in duration seems to be affected by native language in humans and has so far not been found among animals...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389761/a-stop-signal-task-for-sheep-introduction-and-validation-of-a-direct-measure-for-the-stop-signal-reaction-time
#19
Franziska Knolle, Sebastian D McBride, James E Stewart, Rita P Goncalves, A Jennifer Morton
Huntington's disease (HD) patients show reduced flexibility in inhibiting an already-started response. This can be quantified by the stop-signal task. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a sheep version of the stop-signal task that would be suitable for monitoring the progression of cognitive decline in a transgenic sheep model of HD. Using a semi-automated operant system, sheep were trained to perform in a two-choice discrimination task. In 22% of the trials, a stop-signal was presented. Upon the stop-signal presentation, the sheep had to inhibit their already-started response...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28382429/chickadees-discriminate-contingency-reversals-presented-consistently-but-not-frequently
#20
Neil McMillan, Allison H Hahn, Jenna V Congdon, Kimberley A Campbell, John Hoang, Erin N Scully, Marcia L Spetch, Christopher B Sturdy
Chickadees are high-metabolism, non-migratory birds, and thus an especially interesting model for studying how animals follow patterns of food availability over time. Here, we studied whether black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) could learn to reverse their behavior and/or to anticipate changes in reinforcement when the reinforcer contingencies for each stimulus were not stably fixed in time. In Experiment 1, we examined the responses of chickadees on an auditory go/no-go task, with constant reversals in reinforcement contingencies every 120 trials across daily testing intervals...
July 2017: Animal Cognition
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