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Animal Cognition

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324234/damage-induced-alarm-cues-influence-lateralized-behaviour-but-not-the-relationship-between-behavioural-and-habenular-asymmetry-in-convict-cichlids-amatitlania-nigrofasciata
#1
Michele K Moscicki, Peter L Hurd
Cerebral lateralization, the partitioning of functions into a certain hemisphere of the brain, is ubiquitous among vertebrates. Evidence suggests that the cognitive processing of a stimulus is performed with a specific hemisphere depending in part upon the emotional valence of the stimulus (i.e. whether it is appetitive or aversive). Recent work has implicated a predominance of right-hemisphere processing for aversive stimuli. In fish with laterally placed eyes, the preference to view an object with a specific eye has been used as a proxy for assessing cerebral lateralization...
March 21, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28280939/insightful-problem-solving-and-emulation-in-brown-capuchin-monkeys
#2
Elizabeth Renner, Allison M Abramo, M Karen Hambright, Kimberley A Phillips
We investigated problem solving abilities of capuchin monkeys via the "floating object problem," a task in which the subject must use creative problem solving to retrieve a favored food item from the bottom of a clear tube. Some great apes have solved this problem by adding water to raise the object to a level at which it can be easily grabbed. We presented seven capuchins with the task over eight trials (four "dry" and four "wet"). None of the subjects solved the task, indicating that no capuchin demonstrated insightful problem solving under these experimental conditions...
March 9, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28260155/spontaneous-generalization-of-abstract-multimodal-patterns-in-young-domestic-chicks
#3
Elisabetta Versace, Michelle J Spierings, Matteo Caffini, Carel Ten Cate, Giorgio Vallortigara
From the early stages of life, learning the regularities associated with specific objects is crucial for making sense of experiences. Through filial imprinting, young precocial birds quickly learn the features of their social partners by mere exposure. It is not clear though to what extent chicks can extract abstract patterns of the visual and acoustic stimuli present in the imprinting object, and how they combine them. To investigate this issue, we exposed chicks (Gallus gallus) to three days of visual and acoustic imprinting, using either patterns with two identical items or patterns with two different items, presented visually, acoustically or in both modalities...
March 4, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251387/deceptive-like-behaviour-in-dogs-canis-familiaris
#4
Marianne T E Heberlein, Marta B Manser, Dennis C Turner
Deception, the use of false signals to modify the behaviour of the receiver, occurs in low frequencies even in stable signalling systems. For example, it can be advantageous for subordinate individuals to deceive in competitive situations. We investigated in a three-way choice task whether dogs are able to mislead a human competitor, i.e. if they are capable of tactical deception. During training, dogs experienced the role of their owner, as always being cooperative, and two unfamiliar humans, one acting 'cooperatively' by giving food and the other being 'competitive' and keeping the food for themselves...
March 1, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190126/effect-of-interaction-type-on-the-characteristics-of-pet-directed-speech-in-female-dog-owners
#5
Sarah Jeannin, Caroline Gilbert, Gérard Leboucher
Recent studies focusing on the interspecific communicative interactions between humans and dogs show that owners use a special speech register when addressing their dog. This register, called pet-directed speech (PDS), has prosodic and syntactic features similar to that of infant-directed speech (IDS). While IDS prosody is known to vary according to the context of the communication with babies, we still know little about the way owners adjust acoustic and verbal PDS features according to the type of interaction with their dog...
February 11, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185097/change-in-the-relative-contributions-of-habit-and-working-memory-facilitates-serial-reversal-learning-expertise-in-rhesus-monkeys
#6
Thomas C Hassett, Robert R Hampton
Functionally distinct memory systems likely evolved in response to incompatible demands placed on learning by distinct environmental conditions. Working memory appears adapted, in part, for conditions that change frequently, making rapid acquisition and brief retention of information appropriate. In contrast, habits form gradually over many experiences, adapting organisms to contingencies of reinforcement that are stable over relatively long intervals. Serial reversal learning provides an opportunity to simultaneously examine the processes involved in adapting to rapidly changing and relatively stable contingencies...
February 9, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181001/a-critique-and-empirical-assessment-of-alexandra-horowitz-and-julie-hecht-s-examining-dog-human-play-the-characteristics-affect-and-vocalizations-of-a-unique-interspecific-interaction
#7
Robert W Mitchell
Horowitz and Hecht (Anim Cog 19:779-788, 2016) presented data about activities and vocalizations during brief videotaped dog-owner play provided by owners, examined these in relation to human affect during play, and made comparisons from their results to other research on activities and vocalizations during dog-human play. In this critique, I describe problems with Horowitz and Hecht's methodology, analyses, and evidence; in their interpretations of the data, evidence, and categorizations provided in other research, particularly my own studies of dog-human play; and in their claims of novelty for their findings...
February 8, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181000/erratum-to-domestic-horses-send-signals-to-humans-when-they-are-faced-with-an-unsolvable-task
#8
Monamie Ringhofer, Shinya Yamamoto
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 8, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28176133/extended-spider-cognition
#9
REVIEW
Hilton F Japyassú, Kevin N Laland
There is a tension between the conception of cognition as a central nervous system (CNS) process and a view of cognition as extending towards the body or the contiguous environment. The centralised conception requires large or complex nervous systems to cope with complex environments. Conversely, the extended conception involves the outsourcing of information processing to the body or environment, thus making fewer demands on the processing power of the CNS. The evolution of extended cognition should be particularly favoured among small, generalist predators such as spiders, and here, we review the literature to evaluate the fit of empirical data with these contrasting models of cognition...
February 7, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28130606/touch-screen-assays-of-behavioural-flexibility-and-error-characteristics-in-eastern-grey-squirrels-sciurus-carolinensis
#10
Pizza Ka Yee Chow, Lisa A Leaver, Ming Wang, Stephen E G Lea
Behavioural flexibility allows animals to adjust their behaviours according to changing environmental demands. Such flexibility is frequently assessed by the discrimination-reversal learning task. We examined grey squirrels' behavioural flexibility, using a simultaneous colour discrimination-reversal learning task on a touch screen. Squirrels were trained to select their non-preferred colour in the discrimination phase, and their preferred colour was rewarded in a subsequent reversal phase. We used error rates to divide learning in each phase into three stages (perseveration, chance level and 'learned') and examined response inhibition and head-switching during each stage...
January 27, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28102509/mice-optimize-timed-decisions-about-probabilistic-outcomes-under-deadlines
#11
Ezgi Gür, Fuat Balcı
Optimal performance in temporal decisions requires the integration of timing uncertainty with environmental statistics such as probability or cost functions. Reward maximization under response deadlines constitutes one of the most stringent examples of these problems. The current study investigated whether and how mice can optimize their timing behavior in a complex experimental setting under a response deadline in which reward maximization required the integration of timing uncertainty with a geometrically increasing probability/decreasing cost function...
January 19, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025706/does-social-environment-influence-learning-ability-in-a-family-living-lizard
#12
Julia L Riley, Daniel W A Noble, Richard W Byrne, Martin J Whiting
Early developmental environment can have profound effects on individual physiology, behaviour, and learning. In birds and mammals, social isolation during development is known to negatively affect learning ability; yet in other taxa, like reptiles, the effect of social isolation during development on learning ability is unknown. We investigated how social environment affects learning ability in the family-living tree skink (Egernia striolata). We hypothesized that early social environment shapes cognitive development in skinks and predicted that skinks raised in social isolation would have reduced learning ability compared to skinks raised socially...
December 26, 2016: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28044197/thinking-chickens-a-review-of-cognition-emotion-and-behavior-in-the-domestic-chicken
#13
REVIEW
Lori Marino
Domestic chickens are members of an order, Aves, which has been the focus of a revolution in our understanding of neuroanatomical, cognitive, and social complexity. At least some birds are now known to be on par with many mammals in terms of their level of intelligence, emotional sophistication, and social interaction. Yet, views of chickens have largely remained unrevised by this new evidence. In this paper, I examine the peer-reviewed scientific data on the leading edge of cognition, emotions, personality, and sociality in chickens, exploring such areas as self-awareness, cognitive bias, social learning and self-control, and comparing their abilities in these areas with other birds and other vertebrates, particularly mammals...
March 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27709367/a-test-of-the-reward-value-hypothesis
#14
Alexandra E Smith, Stefan J Dalecki, Jonathon D Crystal
Rats retain source memory (memory for the origin of information) over a retention interval of at least 1 week, whereas their spatial working memory (radial maze locations) decays within approximately 1 day. We have argued that different forgetting functions dissociate memory systems. However, the two tasks, in our previous work, used different reward values. The source memory task used multiple pellets of a preferred food flavor (chocolate), whereas the spatial working memory task provided access to a single pellet of standard chow-flavored food at each location...
March 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27658675/generalizing-prosodic-patterns-by-a-non-vocal-learning-mammal
#15
Juan M Toro, Marisa Hoeschele
Prosody, a salient aspect of speech that includes rhythm and intonation, has been shown to help infants acquire some aspects of syntax. Recent studies have shown that birds of two vocal learning species are able to categorize human speech stimuli based on prosody. In the current study, we found that the non-vocal learning rat could also discriminate human speech stimuli based on prosody. Not only that, but rats were able to generalize to novel stimuli they had not been trained with, which suggests that they had not simply memorized the properties of individual stimuli, but learned a prosodic rule...
March 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27632158/the-gestural-repertoire-of-the-wild-bonobo-pan-paniscus-a-mutually-understood-communication-system
#16
Kirsty E Graham, Takeshi Furuichi, Richard W Byrne
In animal communication, signallers and recipients are typically different: each signal is given by one subset of individuals (members of the same age, sex, or social rank) and directed towards another. However, there is scope for signaller-recipient interchangeability in systems where most signals are potentially relevant to all age-sex groups, such as great ape gestural communication. In this study of wild bonobos (Pan paniscus), we aimed to discover whether their gestural communication is indeed a mutually understood communicative repertoire, in which all individuals can act as both signallers and recipients...
March 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093606/erratum-to-adjusting-foraging-strategies-a-comparison-of-rural-and-urban-common-mynas-acridotheres-tristis
#17
Ira G Federspiel, Alexis Garland, David Guez, Thomas Bugnyar, Susan D Healy, Onur Güntürkün, Andrea S Griffin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093605/erratum-to-animal-cognition-in-a-human-dominated-world
#18
Andrea S Griffin, Sabine Tebbich, Thomas Bugnyar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848045/animal-cognition-in-a-human-dominated-world
#19
EDITORIAL
Andrea S Griffin, Sabine Tebbich, Thomas Bugnyar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27796660/responses-of-urban-crows-to-con-and-hetero-specific-alarm-calls-in-predator-and-non-predator-zoo-enclosures
#20
Kateřina Bílá, Jana Beránková, Petr Veselý, Thomas Bugnyar, Christine Schwab
Urban animals and birds in particular are able to cope with diverse novel threats in a city environment such as avoiding novel, unfamiliar predators. Predator avoidance often includes alarm signals that can be used also by hetero-specifics, which is mainly the case in mixed-species flocks. It can also occur when species do not form flocks but co-occur together. In this study we tested whether urban crows use alarm calls of conspecifics and hetero-specifics (jackdaws, Corvus monedula) differently in a predator and a non-predator context with partly novel and unfamiliar zoo animal species...
January 2017: Animal Cognition
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