journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30088128/public-housing-on-the-periphery-vulnerable-residents-and-depleted-resilience-reserves-post-hurricane-sandy
#1
Diana Hernández, David Chang, Carole Hutchinson, Evanah Hill, Amenda Almonte, Rachel Burns, Peggy Shepard, Ingrid Gonzalez, Nora Reissig, David Evans
Hurricane Sandy was the greatest natural disaster to ever impact public housing residents in New York City. It affected approximately 80,000 residents in 400 buildings in 33 developments throughout the city. The storm left residents without power, heat, or running water, yet many chose not to evacuate. This qualitative study was conducted to understand the impact of Sandy among this socially, physically, and geographically vulnerable population. It is the first known study to examine the impact of disasters in high-rise, high-density public housing as a unique risk environment...
August 7, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30073599/dissolution-of-committed-partnerships-during-incarceration-and-sti-hiv-related-sexual-risk-behavior-after-prison-release-among-african-american-men
#2
Maria R Khan, Joy D Scheidell, Carol E Golin, Samuel R Friedman, Adaora A Adimora, Carl W Lejuez, Hui Hu, Kelly Quinn, David A Wohl
Incarceration is strongly associated with post-release STI/HIV risk. One pathway linking incarceration and STI/HIV risk may be incarceration-related dissolution of protective network ties. Among African American men released from prison who were in committed partnerships with women at the time of incarceration (N = 207), we measured the association between committed partnership dissolution during incarceration and STI/HIV risk in the 4 weeks after release. Over one-quarter (28%) experienced incarceration-related partnership dissolution...
August 2, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30073598/addressing-intersecting-housing-and-overdose-crises-in-vancouver-canada-opportunities-and-challenges-from-a-tenant-led-overdose-response-intervention-in-single-room-occupancy-hotels
#3
Geoff Bardwell, Taylor Fleming, Alexandra B Collins, Jade Boyd, Ryan McNeil
We examined the acceptability, feasibility, and implementation of the Tenant Overdose Response Organizers program (TORO)-a tenant-led naloxone training and distribution intervention. This pilot project was implemented in privately owned single room occupancy (SRO) hotels that were disproportionately affected by overdose in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES) neighborhood. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 tenants who had participated in a TORO training session and administered naloxone to someone in their SRO hotel or had overdosed in their SRO hotel and received naloxone from another tenant...
August 2, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30066174/implementing-targeted-sampling-lessons-learned-from-recruiting-female-sex-workers-in-baltimore-md
#4
Sean T Allen, Katherine H A Footer, Noya Galai, Ju Nyeong Park, Bradley Silberzahn, Susan G Sherman
Globally, HIV prevention interventions have proven efficacious among street-based female sex workers (FSWs); yet, there is a dearth of US-based HIV prevention research among this group. The lack of research among FSWs in the USA is partially driven by challenges in recruiting members of this population. The purpose of this research is to describe how targeted sampling was employed to recruit a cohort of street-based FSWs for a study that examined the role of police in shaping the HIV risk environments of street-based FSWs in Baltimore, MD...
July 31, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30062644/the-influence-of-neighborhood-social-capital-on-leisure-time-physical-activity-a-population-based-study-in-brazil
#5
Daiana Elias Rodrigues, Cibele Comini César, Ichiro Kawachi, César Coelho Xavier, Waleska Teixeira Caiaffa, Fernando Augusto Proietti
Environmentally targeted approaches to promote physical activity are emerging in recent years as a complementary strategy to the traditional individual approaches. This study explored the relation between community social capital and leisure-time physical activity in an adult population-based sample in Brazil. We applied a generalized estimating equation approach to analyze a cross-sectional survey of 3667 adults living in 149 neighborhoods. Social capital was assessed by scales that measured collective efficacy and social cohesion in the neighborhood...
July 30, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30051239/concept-mapping-engaging-urban-men-to-understand-community-influences-on-partner-violence-perpetration
#6
Charvonne N Holliday, Sophie M Morse, Nathan A Irvin, Angelique Green-Manning, Lisa M Nitsch, Jessica G Burke, Jacquelyn C Campbell, Michele R Decker
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant health concern rooted in community experiences and other social determinants. The purpose of this study is to understand community-based risk and protective factors of IPV perpetration through participatory research that engages men who use IPV. Secondarily, we assess the relative influence, as measured by ranking, of these factors regarding risk of IPV perpetration and stress. We conducted concept mapping with Baltimore men (n = 28), ages 18 and older, enrolled in an abuse intervention program (AIP), through partnership with a domestic violence agency...
July 26, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30051238/power-outage-preparedness-and-concern-among-vulnerable-new-york-city-residents
#7
Christine Dominianni, Munerah Ahmed, Sarah Johnson, Micheline Blum, Kazuhiko Ito, Kathryn Lane
Power outages can impact health, and certain populations may be more at risk. Personal preparedness may reduce impacts, but information on power outage preparedness and risk perception among vulnerable populations is limited. We examined power outage preparedness and concern among New York City residents, including vulnerable populations defined as older adults (≥ 65 years), and respondents with household members who require assistance with daily activities or depend on electric medical devices. A random sample telephone survey was conducted during November-December 2016...
July 26, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30046951/environmental-and-socio-demographic-factors-associated-with-6-10-year-old-children-s-school-travel-in-urban-and-non-urban-settings
#8
Daniela Rodrigues, Cristina Padez, Aristides M Machado-Rodrigues
Walking or bicycling to school is an important source of physical activity and may help prevent childhood obesity. However, active commuting has been declining in recent decades. The purposes of this study were to explore travel characteristics in children and examine factors associated with active commuting in children living in urban and non-urban setting. Participants were 834 parents and corresponding children aged 6-10 years, living in the district of Coimbra, Portugal. Data were collected during April-June of 2013 and 2014...
July 25, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30039302/correction-to-talking-the-walk-perceptions-of-neighborhood-characteristics-from-users-of-open-streets-programs-in-latin-america-and-the-usa
#9
Susan G Zieff, Elaine A Musselman, Olga L Sarmiento, Silvia A Gonzalez, Nicolas Aguilar-Farias, Sandra J Winter, J Aaron Hipp, Karoll Quijano, Abby C King
There were two errors in this article as originally published: Coauthor Olga L. Sarmiento was listed with an affiliation-Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute-that does not apply to her (only "Universidad de los Andes Bogota, Colombia" is a correct affiliation for her).
July 23, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30039301/the-effect-of-violence-and-intersecting-structural-inequities-on-high-rates-of-food-insecurity-among-marginalized-sex-workers-in-a-canadian-setting
#10
Daniella Barreto, Jeannie Shoveller, Melissa Braschel, Putu Duff, Kate Shannon
Food security is both a basic human right and a public health necessity. Despite known gendered contexts of food insecurity, there is a dearth of research on prevalence and factors driving increased food insecurity for sex workers in a criminalized setting. The current study longitudinally examines the prevalence and structural and individual factors associated with increased odds of food insecurity among street and off-street sex workers in a Canadian urban setting. Prospective analyses drew on data from a community-based longitudinal cohort of cis and trans women in street and off-street sex work in An Evaluation of Sex Workers Health Access (2010-2014)...
July 23, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30030685/food-insecurity-morbidities-and-substance-use-in-adults-on-probation-in-rhode-island
#11
Kimberly R Dong, Aviva Must, Alice M Tang, Thomas J Stopka, Curt G Beckwith
When individuals are on probation, they face challenges with securing employment and safe housing due to their criminal records, which may make food access problematic. Food insecurity is a construct used as a marker for food access that considers financial constraints and has been associated with poorer health and substance use. There is limited research on the extent of food insecurity and associated morbidities and substance use among adults on probation. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2016, surveying 304 probationers in Rhode Island to determine whether food insecurity is associated with obesity, high blood pressure, depression, and substance use...
July 20, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30027428/personal-versus-group-experiences-of-racism-and-risk-of-delivering-a-small-for-gestational-age-infant-in-african-american-women-a-life-course-perspective
#12
Jaime C Slaughter-Acey, Lloyd M Talley, Howard C Stevenson, Dawn P Misra
The majority of studies investigating the relationship between racism/racial discrimination and birth outcomes have focused on perceived experiences of racism/racial discrimination directed at oneself (personal racism). However, evidence suggests individuals report with greater frequency racism/racial discrimination directed at friends, family members, or other members of their racial/ethnic group (group racism). We examined how much African American (AA) women report lifetime experiences of perceived racism or racial discrimination, both personal and group, varied by maternal age...
July 19, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30027427/the-burden-of-untreated-hcv-infection-in-hospitalized-inmates-a-hospital-utilization-and-cost-analysis
#13
Alysse G Wurcel, Deirdre J Burke, Jianing J Wang, Brian Engle, Kathryn Noonan, Tamsin A Knox, Arthur Y Kim, Benjamin P Linas
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly prevalent in incarcerated populations. The high cost of HCV therapy places a major burden on correctional system healthcare budgets, but the burden of untreated HCV is not known. We investigated the economic impact of HCV through comparison of length of stay (LOS), frequency of 30-day readmission, and costs of hospitalizations in inmates with and without HCV using a 2004-2014 administrative claims database. Inmates with HCV had longer LOS, higher frequency of 30-day readmission, and increased cost of hospitalizations...
July 19, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30022417/correction-to-is-the-urban-child-health-advantage-declining-in-malawi-evidence-from-demographic-and-health-surveys-and-multiple-indicator-cluster-surveys
#14
Edgar Arnold Lungu, Regien Biesma, Maureen Chirwa, Catherine Darker
The third from last sentence of the abstract, which reads: "However, U-5MR shows reversal to a significant urban advantage in 2015/2016, and slight increases in urban advantage are noted for infant mortality rate, underweight, full childhood immunization, and stunting rate in 2015/2016".
July 18, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30022416/childbearing-motivations-and-desires-fertility-beliefs-and-contraceptive-use-among-urban-african-american-adolescents-and-young-adults-with-sti-histories
#15
Kamila A Alexander, Nancy Perrin, Jacky M Jennings, Jonathan Ellen, Maria Trent
This study explored the influence of STI history on childbearing motivations, fertility beliefs, current childbearing desires, and contraception use among urban African-American adolescents and young adults (AYA). Secondary data were from the Neighborhood Influences on Adolescent and Young Adult Health (NIAAH) study, conducted from 2004 to 2007. Sample included 517 AYA ages 15-24 years (male: n = 199, female: n = 318). Linear and logistic regression models examined gender differences in childbearing motivations (CBM) and desires, fertility beliefs, condom, and contraception use...
July 18, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30019116/introduction-to-the-special-issue-of-the-journal-of-urban-health-on-incarceration-and-health
#16
EDITORIAL
Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Radha Sadacharan, Alexandra Macmadu, Josiah D Rich
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 17, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30014213/assessment-of-cardiovascular-health-among-community-dwelling-men-with-incarceration-history
#17
Aaron D Fobian, Morgan Froelich, Aaron Sellers, Karen Cropsey, Nicole Redmond
Returning to the community after incarceration is a particularly vulnerable time with significantly increased risk of death in the first 2 weeks. The elevated risk of death persists as long as 2 years, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) among the leading causes. African-Americans, especially African-American men, have higher rates of incarceration and community supervision (e.g., probation and parole) and an earlier onset of hypertension compared to Whites. Few studies have objectively assessed the cardiovascular health profile of criminal justice involved individuals...
July 16, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29995281/geography-and-urban-health
#18
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 11, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29987773/change-in-obesity-prevalence-among-new-york-city-adults-the-nyc-health-and-nutrition-examination-survey-2004-and-2013-2014
#19
Pasquale Rummo, Rania Kanchi, Sharon Perlman, Brian Elbel, Chau Trinh-Shevrin, Lorna Thorpe
The objective of this study was to measure change in obesity prevalence among New York City (NYC) adults from 2004 to 2013-2014 and assess variation across sociodemographic subgroups. We used objectively measured height and weight data from the NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to calculate relative percent change in obesity (≥ 30 kg/m2 ) between 2004 (n = 1987) and 2013-2014 (n = 1489) among all NYC adults and sociodemographic subgroups. We also examined changes in self-reported proxies for energy imbalance...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29987772/gender-and-race-disparities-in-cardiovascular-disease-risk-factors-among-new-york-city-adults-new-york-city-health-and-nutrition-examination-survey-nyc-hanes-2013-2014
#20
Rania Kanchi, Sharon E Perlman, Claudia Chernov, Winfred Wu, Bahman P Tabaei, Chau Trinh-Shevrin, Nadia Islam, Azizi Seixas, Jesica Rodriguez-Lopez, Lorna E Thorpe
While gender and racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have each been well characterized, few studies have comprehensively examined how patterns of major CVD risk factors vary and intersect across gender and major racial/ethnic groups, considered together. Using data from New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2013-2014-a population-based, cross-sectional survey of NYC residents ages 20 years and older-we measured prevalence of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and diabetes across gender and race/ethnicity groups for 1527 individuals...
July 9, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
journal
journal
33027
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"