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Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30324357/contributions-of-neighborhood-parks-to-physical-activity-in-high-poverty-urban-neighborhoods
#1
Sujeong Park, Bing Han, Deborah A Cohen, Kathryn P Derose
Neighborhood parks are important venues for the urban population to do moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in leisure time. Parks can be particularly important for low-income neighborhoods, whose residents suffer from high rates of chronic diseases and may have less access to fee-based fitness exercise facilities. This study assessed the contribution of parks to local populations' physical activity in 48 high-poverty neighborhoods in the city of Los Angeles, using systematic observation of park use and surveys of park users and residents conducted between 2013 and 2015...
October 15, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30324356/safety-of-a-modified-community-trailer-to-manage-patients-with-presumed-fentanyl-overdose
#2
Frank X Scheuermeyer, Eric Grafstein, Jane Buxton, Keith Ahamad, Mark Lysyshyn, Stan DeVlaming, Gerrit Prinsloo, Christopher Van Veen, Andrew Kestler, Reka Gustafson
Opioid overdoses (OD) cause substantial morbidity and mortality globally, and current emergency management is typically limited to supportive care, with variable emphasis on harm reduction and addictions treatment. Our urban setting has a high concentration of patients with presumed fentanyl OD, which places a burden on both pre-hospital and emergency department (ED) resources. From December 13, 2016, to March 1, 2017, we placed a modified trailer away from an ED but near the center of the expected area of high OD and accepted low-risk patients with presumed fentanyl OD...
October 15, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30324355/privacy-confidentiality-and-safety-considerations-for-conducting-geographic-momentary-assessment-studies-among-persons-who-use-drugs-and-men-who-have-sex-with-men
#3
Abby E Rudolph, April M Young, Jennifer R Havens
Geographic momentary assessments (GMA) collect real-time behavioral data in one's natural environment using a smartphone and could potentially increase the ecological validity of behavioral data. Several studies have evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of GMA among persons who use drugs (PWUD) and men who have sex with men (MSM), but fewer have discussed privacy, confidentiality, and safety concerns, particularly when illegal or stigmatized behavioral data were collected. This study explores perceptions regarding privacy, confidentiality, and safety of GMA research among PWUD and MSM recruited in three different settings (rural Appalachia, a mid-sized city in the South, and a mid-Atlantic city)...
October 15, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30311055/variation-in-rates-of-fatal-police-shootings-across-us-states-the-role-of-firearm-availability
#4
David Hemenway, Deborah Azrael, Andrew Conner, Matthew Miller
The USA has very high rates of homicide by police compared to other high-income countries, with approximately 1000 civilians killed annually. The overwhelming majority of these police homicides are fatal shootings. Over the past 5 years, several comprehensive, real-time, data repositories, drawn largely from news reporting, have kept track of incidents in which civilians die during an encounter with the police and have become widely available. Data from these repositories, which are more complete than data available from federal data systems, have been used to explore fatal police shootings of civilians, often with a focus on racial disparities in police shootings of unarmed civilians, and have consistently found that police are more likely to shoot unarmed African American men than unarmed White men...
October 11, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30264231/the-urban-health-equity-assessment-and-response-tool-heart-a-decade-of-development-and-implementation
#5
EDITORIAL
Amit Prasad
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 27, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30232690/how-do-risk-environment-factors-influence-perpetration-of-partner-violence-among-male-migrant-and-non-migrant-market-workers-in-central-asia
#6
Louisa Gilbert, Lynn Michalopolous, Xin Ma, Tina Jiwatram-Negrón, Assel Terlikbayeva, Sholpan Primbetova, Tara McCrimmon, Mingway Chang, Timothy Hunt, Stacey A Shaw, Gaukhar Mergenova
Intimate partner violence (IPV) has emerged as a serious public health issue in migrant communities in Central Asia and globally. To date, however, research on risk factors associated with male perpetration of IPV among migrants remains scant. This study aims to examine risk environment theory-driven factors associated with male perpetration of IPV in the prior 6 months. We recruited, enrolled, and surveyed a respondent-driven sample of 1342 male market workers in Almaty, Kazakhstan, that included 562 (42%) non-migrants defined as Kazakhstan citizens who reside in Almaty; 502 (37%) external migrants from Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, or Uzbekistan; and 278 (21%) internal migrants from other areas of Kazakhstan...
September 19, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30232689/the-association-between-park-facilities-and-duration-of-physical-activity-during-active-park-visits
#7
Orion T Stewart, Anne Vernez Moudon, Alyson J Littman, Edmund Seto, Brian E Saelens
Public parks provide places for urban residents to obtain physical activity (PA), which is associated with numerous health benefits. Adding facilities to existing parks could be a cost-effective approach to increase the duration of PA that occurs during park visits. Using objectively measured PA and comprehensively measured park visit data among an urban community-dwelling sample of adults, we tested the association between the variety of park facilities that directly support PA and the duration of PA during park visits where any PA occurred...
September 19, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30191511/drug-treatment-accessed-through-the-criminal-justice-system-participants-perspectives-and-uses
#8
Alana Rosenberg, Robert Heimer, Danya E Keene, Allison K Groves, Kim M Blankenship
The criminal justice system has become a major pathway to drug treatment across the USA. Millions of criminal justice dollars are spent on an array of treatment programs for justice-involved populations, from pre-sentence diversionary programs to outpatient services for those on community supervision. This study uses 235 qualitative, longitudinal interviews with 45 people convicted of drug offenses to describe participants' perspectives on criminal justice-related drug treatment (programs within correctional facilities; court, probation, or parole-ordered mandates and referrals; and self-referrals made with the goal of reducing criminal justice involvement), beyond discourses about help with addiction...
September 6, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30182249/relationship-of-racial-residential-segregation-to-newly-diagnosed-cases-of-hiv-among-black-heterosexuals-in-us-metropolitan-areas-2008-2015
#9
Umedjon Ibragimov, Stephanie Beane, Adaora A Adimora, Samuel R Friedman, Leslie Williams, Barbara Tempalski, Ron Stall, Gina Wingood, H Irene Hall, Anna Satcher Johnson, Hannah L F Cooper
Social science and public health literature has framed residential segregation as a potent structural determinant of the higher HIV burden among black heterosexuals, but empirical evidence has been limited. The purpose of this study is to test, for the first time, the association between racial segregation and newly diagnosed heterosexually acquired HIV cases among black adults and adolescents in 95 large US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in 2008-2015. We operationalized racial segregation (the main exposure) using Massey and Denton's isolation index for black residents; the outcome was the rate of newly diagnosed HIV cases per 10,000 black adult heterosexuals...
September 4, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30159634/reducing-inequity-in-urban-health-have-the-intra-urban-differentials-in-reproductive-health-service-utilization-and-child-nutritional-outcome-narrowed-in-bangladesh
#10
Gustavo Angeles, Karar Zunaid Ahsan, Peter Kim Streatfield, Shams El Arifeen, Kanta Jamil
Bangladesh is undergoing a rapid urbanization process. About one-third of the population of major cities in the country live in slums, which are areas that exhibit pronounced concentrations of factors that negatively affect health and nutrition. People living in slums face greater challenge to improve their health than other parts of the country, which fuels the growing intra-urban health inequities. Two rounds of the Bangladesh Urban Health Survey (UHS), conducted in 2013 and 2006, were designed to examine the reproductive health status and service utilization between slum and non-slum residents...
August 29, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30151815/correction-to-avenues-of-influence-the-relationship-between-health-impact-assessment-and-determinants-of-health-and-health-equity
#11
Elizabeth Kelley Sohn, Lauren J Stein, Allison Wolpoff, Ruth Lindberg, Abigail Baum, Arielle McInnis-Simoncelli, Keshia M Pollack
Please note that the correct name of the penultimate author of this article is "Arielle McInnis-Simoncelli", not "Arielle Mc-Innis Simoncelli" as presented in the article as originally published. The original article has been corrected.
August 27, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30141116/housing-quality-and-mental-health-the-association-between-pest-infestation-and-depressive-symptoms-among-public-housing-residents
#12
Snehal N Shah, Alan Fossa, Abigail S Steiner, John Kane, Jonathan I Levy, Gary Adamkiewicz, Willie Mae Bennett-Fripp, Margaret Reid
Housing quality, which includes structural and environmental risks, has been associated with multiple physical health outcomes including injury and asthma. Cockroach and mouse infestations can be prime manifestations of diminished housing quality. While the respiratory health effects of pest infestation are well documented, little is known about the association between infestation and mental health outcomes. To address this gap in knowledge and given the potential to intervene to reduce pest infestation, we assessed the association between household pest infestation and symptoms of depression among public housing residents...
August 23, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30136249/transactional-sex-among-men-who-have-sex-with-men-differences-by-substance-use-and-hiv-status
#13
Marjan Javanbakht, Amy Ragsdale, Steven Shoptaw, Pamina M Gorbach
Exchanging money, drugs, and other goods for sex has been associated with sexual risk behaviors and increased STIs/HIV. While female sex work is well described, data on men who exchange sex for money or goods are more limited. This paper examined the prevalence and correlates of transactional sex among young men who have sex with men, especially focusing on substance use and HIV status. We conducted a cohort study of 511 participants recruited between August 2014 and December 2017 in Los Angeles, CA. Eligible participants were: (1) between 18 and 45 years of age; (2) male; and (3) if HIV-negative, reported condomless anal intercourse with a male partner in the past 6 months...
August 22, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30129003/correction-to-change-in-obesity-prevalence-among-new-york-city-adults-the-nyc-health-and-nutrition-examination-survey-2004-and-2013-2014
#14
Pasquale Rummo, Rania Kanchi, Sharon Perlman, Brian Elbel, Chau Trinh-Shevrin, Lorna Thorpe
Readers should note the following two typographical errors in this article.
August 20, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30120726/sources-of-stress-among-adults-with-co-occurring-drug-use-and-depressive-symptoms
#15
Kayla N Tormohlen, Karin E Tobin, Carl Latkin
Stress, drug use, and depression are interconnected, but less is understood about sources of stress among adults with co-occurring drug use and depressive symptoms. The current study aimed to identify sources of stress and correlates among these adults. Data come from a cross-sectional baseline survey, including participants (n = 336) 18 to 55 years old, who reported past 6-month heroin or cocaine use and depressive symptoms. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify sources of stress. Chi-square and multivariable Poisson regression with robust error variance were used to explore correlates of each factor...
August 17, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30117057/correction-to-association-between-firearm-laws-and-homicide-in-urban-counties
#16
Cassandra K Crifasi, Molly Merrill-Francis, Alex McCourt, Jon S Vernick, Garen J Wintemute, Daniel W Webster
The authors would like to publish this erratum to correct estimates generated from regression analyses due to errors discovered in the coding of some state laws.
August 16, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30117056/tracking-declines-in-mercury-exposure-in-the-new-york-city-adult-population-2004-2014
#17
Wendy McKelvey, Byron Alex, Claudia Chernov, Paromita Hore, Christopher D Palmer, Amy J Steuerwald, Patrick J Parsons, Sharon E Perlman
Mercury is a toxic metal that can be measured in human blood and urine. Population-based biomonitoring from 2004 guided New York City (NYC) Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) efforts to reduce exposures by educating the public about risks and benefits of fish consumption-a predominant source of exposure in the general population-and removing mercury-containing skin-lightening creams and other consumer products from the marketplace. We describe changes in exposures over the past decade in relation to these local public health actions and in the context of national changes by comparing mercury concentrations measured in blood (1201 specimens) and urine (1408 specimens) from the NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES) 2013-2014 with measurements from NYC HANES 2004 and National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2003-2004 and 2013-2014...
August 16, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30088128/public-housing-on-the-periphery-vulnerable-residents-and-depleted-resilience-reserves-post-hurricane-sandy
#18
Diana Hernández, David Chang, Carole Hutchinson, Evanah Hill, Amenda Almonte, Rachel Burns, Peggy Shepard, Ingrid Gonzalez, Nora Reissig, David Evans
Hurricane Sandy was the greatest natural disaster to ever impact public housing residents in New York City. It affected approximately 80,000 residents in 400 buildings in 33 developments throughout the city. The storm left residents without power, heat, or running water, yet many chose not to evacuate. This qualitative study was conducted to understand the impact of Sandy among this socially, physically, and geographically vulnerable population. It is the first known study to examine the impact of disasters in high-rise, high-density public housing as a unique risk environment...
August 7, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30073598/addressing-intersecting-housing-and-overdose-crises-in-vancouver-canada-opportunities-and-challenges-from-a-tenant-led-overdose-response-intervention-in-single-room-occupancy-hotels
#19
Geoff Bardwell, Taylor Fleming, Alexandra B Collins, Jade Boyd, Ryan McNeil
We examined the acceptability, feasibility, and implementation of the Tenant Overdose Response Organizers program (TORO)-a tenant-led naloxone training and distribution intervention. This pilot project was implemented in privately owned single room occupancy (SRO) hotels that were disproportionately affected by overdose in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES) neighborhood. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 tenants who had participated in a TORO training session and administered naloxone to someone in their SRO hotel or had overdosed in their SRO hotel and received naloxone from another tenant...
August 2, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30066174/implementing-targeted-sampling-lessons-learned-from-recruiting-female-sex-workers-in-baltimore-md
#20
Sean T Allen, Katherine H A Footer, Noya Galai, Ju Nyeong Park, Bradley Silberzahn, Susan G Sherman
Globally, HIV prevention interventions have proven efficacious among street-based female sex workers (FSWs); yet, there is a dearth of US-based HIV prevention research among this group. The lack of research among FSWs in the USA is partially driven by challenges in recruiting members of this population. The purpose of this research is to describe how targeted sampling was employed to recruit a cohort of street-based FSWs for a study that examined the role of police in shaping the HIV risk environments of street-based FSWs in Baltimore, MD...
July 31, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
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