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Nature Neuroscience

Anthony Holtmaat, Pico Caroni
Learning and memory are associated with the formation and modification of neuronal assemblies: populations of neurons that encode what has been learned and mediate memory retrieval upon recall. Functional studies of neuronal assemblies have progressed dramatically thanks to recent technological advances. Here we discuss how a focus on assembly formation and consolidation has provided a powerful conceptual framework to relate mechanistic studies of synaptic and circuit plasticity to behaviorally relevant aspects of learning and memory...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Junjie Luo, Wei L Shen, Craig Montell
Avoidance of noxious ambient heat is crucial for survival. A well-known phenomenon is that animals are sensitive to the rate of temperature change. However, the cellular and molecular underpinnings through which animals sense and respond much more vigorously to fast temperature changes are unknown. Using Drosophila larvae, we found that nociceptive rolling behavior was triggered at lower temperatures and at higher frequencies when the temperature increased rapidly. We identified neurons in the brain that were sensitive to the speed of the temperature increase rather than just to the absolute temperature...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Siyu Zhang, Min Xu, Wei-Cheng Chang, Chenyan Ma, Johnny Phong Hoang Do, Daniel Jeong, Tiffany Lei, Jiang Lan Fan, Yang Dan
Long-range projections from the frontal cortex are known to modulate sensory processing in multiple modalities. Although the mouse has become an increasingly important animal model for studying the circuit basis of behavior, the functional organization of its frontal cortical long-range connectivity remains poorly characterized. Here we used virus-assisted circuit mapping to identify the brain networks for top-down modulation of visual, somatosensory and auditory processing. The visual cortex is reciprocally connected to the anterior cingulate area, whereas the somatosensory and auditory cortices are connected to the primary and secondary motor cortices...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jérémie Barral, Alex D Reyes
The balance between excitation and inhibition (E-I balance) is maintained across brain regions though the network size, strength and number of synaptic connections, and connection architecture may vary substantially. We use a culture preparation to examine the homeostatic synaptic scaling rules that produce E-I balance and in vivo-like activity. We show that synaptic strength scales with the number of connections K as ∼ , close to the ideal theoretical value. Using optogenetic techniques, we delivered spatiotemporally patterned stimuli to neurons and confirmed key theoretical predictions: E-I balance is maintained, active decorrelation occurs and the spiking correlation increases with firing rate...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Joshua Kim, Michele Pignatelli, Sangyu Xu, Shigeyoshi Itohara, Susumu Tonegawa
The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a site of convergence of negative and positive stimuli and is critical for emotional behaviors and associations. However, the neural substrate for negative and positive behaviors and relationship between negative and positive representations in the basolateral amygdala are unknown. Here we identify two genetically distinct, spatially segregated populations of excitatory neurons in the mouse BLA that participate in valence-specific behaviors and are connected through mutual inhibition...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jianing Yu, Diego A Gutnisky, S Andrew Hires, Karel Svoboda
We rely on movement to explore the environment, for example, by palpating an object. In somatosensory cortex, activity related to movement of digits or whiskers is suppressed, which could facilitate detection of touch. Movement-related suppression is generally assumed to involve corollary discharges. Here we uncovered a thalamocortical mechanism in which cortical fast-spiking interneurons, driven by sensory input, suppress movement-related activity in layer 4 (L4) excitatory neurons. In mice locating objects with their whiskers, neurons in the ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM) fired in response to touch and whisker movement...
October 17, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Michael W Cole, Takuya Ito, Danielle S Bassett, Douglas H Schultz
Resting-state functional connectivity (FC) has helped reveal the intrinsic network organization of the human brain, yet its relevance to cognitive task activations has been unclear. Uncertainty remains despite evidence that resting-state FC patterns are highly similar to cognitive task activation patterns. Identifying the distributed processes that shape localized cognitive task activations may help reveal why resting-state FC is so strongly related to cognitive task activations. We found that estimating task-evoked activity flow (the spread of activation amplitudes) over resting-state FC networks allowed prediction of cognitive task activations in a large-scale neural network model...
October 10, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Rajeeve Sivadasan, Daniel Hornburg, Carsten Drepper, Nicolas Frank, Sibylle Jablonka, Anna Hansel, Xenia Lojewski, Jared Sterneckert, Andreas Hermann, Pamela J Shaw, Paul G Ince, Matthias Mann, Felix Meissner, Michael Sendtner
Intronic hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72 are common in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia, but it is unknown whether loss of function, toxicity by the expanded RNA or dipeptides from non-ATG-initiated translation are responsible for the pathophysiology. We determined the interactome of C9ORF72 in motor neurons and found that C9ORF72 was present in a complex with cofilin and other actin binding proteins. Phosphorylation of cofilin was enhanced in C9ORF72-depleted motor neurons, in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons and post-mortem brain samples from ALS patients...
October 10, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
William A Liberti, Jeffrey E Markowitz, L Nathan Perkins, Derek C Liberti, Daniel P Leman, Grigori Guitchounts, Tarciso Velho, Darrell N Kotton, Carlos Lois, Timothy J Gardner
Motor skills can be maintained for decades, but the biological basis of this memory persistence remains largely unknown. The zebra finch, for example, sings a highly stereotyped song that is stable for years, but it is not known whether the precise neural patterns underlying song are stable or shift from day to day. Here we demonstrate that the population of projection neurons coding for song in the premotor nucleus, HVC, change from day to day. The most dramatic shifts occur over intervals of sleep. In contrast to the transient participation of excitatory neurons, ensemble measurements dominated by inhibition persist unchanged even after damage to downstream motor nerves...
October 10, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Omer Durak, Fan Gao, Yea Jin Kaeser-Woo, Richard Rueda, Anthony J Martorell, Alexi Nott, Carol Y Liu, L Ashley Watson, Li-Huei Tsai
De novo mutations in CHD8 are strongly associated with autism spectrum disorder, but the basic biology of CHD8 remains poorly understood. Here we report that Chd8 knockdown during cortical development results in defective neural progenitor proliferation and differentiation that ultimately manifests in abnormal neuronal morphology and behaviors in adult mice. Transcriptome analysis revealed that while Chd8 stimulates the transcription of cell cycle genes, it also precludes the induction of neural-specific genes by regulating the expression of PRC2 complex components...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Giulio Genovese, Menachem Fromer, Eli A Stahl, Douglas M Ruderfer, Kimberly Chambert, Mikael Landén, Jennifer L Moran, Shaun M Purcell, Pamela Sklar, Patrick F Sullivan, Christina M Hultman, Steven A McCarroll
By analyzing the exomes of 12,332 unrelated Swedish individuals, including 4,877 individuals affected with schizophrenia, in ways informed by exome sequences from 45,376 other individuals, we identified 244,246 coding-sequence and splice-site ultra-rare variants (URVs) that were unique to individual Swedes. We found that gene-disruptive and putatively protein-damaging URVs (but not synonymous URVs) were more abundant among individuals with schizophrenia than among controls (P = 1.3 × 10(-10)). This elevation of protein-compromising URVs was several times larger than an analogously elevated rate for de novo mutations, suggesting that most rare-variant effects on schizophrenia risk are inherited...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Andrea Ganna, Giulio Genovese, Daniel P Howrigan, Andrea Byrnes, Mitja I Kurki, Seyedeh M Zekavat, Christopher W Whelan, Mart Kals, Michel G Nivard, Alex Bloemendal, Jonathan M Bloom, Jacqueline I Goldstein, Timothy Poterba, Cotton Seed, Robert E Handsaker, Pradeep Natarajan, Reedik Mägi, Diane Gage, Elise B Robinson, Andres Metspalu, Veikko Salomaa, Jaana Suvisaari, Shaun M Purcell, Pamela Sklar, Sekar Kathiresan, Mark J Daly, Steven A McCarroll, Patrick F Sullivan, Aarno Palotie, Tõnu Esko, Christina M Hultman, Benjamin M Neale
Disruptive, damaging ultra-rare variants in highly constrained genes are enriched in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. In the general population, this class of variants was associated with a decrease in years of education (YOE). This effect was stronger among highly brain-expressed genes and explained more YOE variance than pathogenic copy number variation but less than common variants. Disruptive, damaging ultra-rare variants in highly constrained genes influence the determinants of YOE in the general population...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Marcus K Benna, Stefano Fusi
Memories are stored and retained through complex, coupled processes operating on multiple timescales. To understand the computational principles behind these intricate networks of interactions, we construct a broad class of synaptic models that efficiently harness biological complexity to preserve numerous memories by protecting them against the adverse effects of overwriting. The memory capacity scales almost linearly with the number of synapses, which is a substantial improvement over the square root scaling of previous models...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Hieab H H Adams, Derrek P Hibar, Vincent Chouraki, Jason L Stein, Paul A Nyquist, Miguel E Rentería, Stella Trompet, Alejandro Arias-Vasquez, Sudha Seshadri, Sylvane Desrivières, Ashley H Beecham, Neda Jahanshad, Katharina Wittfeld, Sven J Van der Lee, Lucija Abramovic, Saud Alhusaini, Najaf Amin, Micael Andersson, Konstantinos Arfanakis, Benjamin S Aribisala, Nicola J Armstrong, Lavinia Athanasiu, Tomas Axelsson, Alexa Beiser, Manon Bernard, Joshua C Bis, Laura M E Blanken, Susan H Blanton, Marc M Bohlken, Marco P Boks, Janita Bralten, Adam M Brickman, Owen Carmichael, M Mallar Chakravarty, Ganesh Chauhan, Qiang Chen, Christopher R K Ching, Gabriel Cuellar-Partida, Anouk Den Braber, Nhat Trung Doan, Stefan Ehrlich, Irina Filippi, Tian Ge, Sudheer Giddaluru, Aaron L Goldman, Rebecca F Gottesman, Corina U Greven, Oliver Grimm, Michael E Griswold, Tulio Guadalupe, Johanna Hass, Unn K Haukvik, Saima Hilal, Edith Hofer, David Hoehn, Avram J Holmes, Martine Hoogman, Deborah Janowitz, Tianye Jia, Dalia Kasperaviciute, Sungeun Kim, Marieke Klein, Bernd Kraemer, Phil H Lee, Jiemin Liao, David C M Liewald, Lorna M Lopez, Michelle Luciano, Christine Macare, Andre Marquand, Mar Matarin, Karen A Mather, Manuel Mattheisen, Bernard Mazoyer, David R McKay, Rebekah McWhirter, Yuri Milaneschi, Nazanin Mirza-Schreiber, Ryan L Muetzel, Susana Muñoz Maniega, Kwangsik Nho, Allison C Nugent, Loes M Olde Loohuis, Jaap Oosterlaan, Martina Papmeyer, Irene Pappa, Lukas Pirpamer, Sara Pudas, Benno Pütz, Kumar B Rajan, Adaikalavan Ramasamy, Jennifer S Richards, Shannon L Risacher, Roberto Roiz-Santiañez, Nanda Rommelse, Emma J Rose, Natalie A Royle, Tatjana Rundek, Philipp G Sämann, Claudia L Satizabal, Lianne Schmaal, Andrew J Schork, Li Shen, Jean Shin, Elena Shumskaya, Albert V Smith, Emma Sprooten, Lachlan T Strike, Alexander Teumer, Russell Thomson, Diana Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Roberto Toro, Daniah Trabzuni, Dhananjay Vaidya, Jeroen Van der Grond, Dennis Van der Meer, Marjolein M J Van Donkelaar, Kristel R Van Eijk, Theo G M Van Erp, Daan Van Rooij, Esther Walton, Lars T Westlye, Christopher D Whelan, Beverly G Windham, Anderson M Winkler, Girma Woldehawariat, Christiane Wolf, Thomas Wolfers, Bing Xu, Lisa R Yanek, Jingyun Yang, Alex Zijdenbos, Marcel P Zwiers, Ingrid Agartz, Neelum T Aggarwal, Laura Almasy, David Ames, Philippe Amouyel, Ole A Andreassen, Sampath Arepalli, Amelia A Assareh, Sandra Barral, Mark E Bastin, Diane M Becker, James T Becker, David A Bennett, John Blangero, Hans van Bokhoven, Dorret I Boomsma, Henry Brodaty, Rachel M Brouwer, Han G Brunner, Randy L Buckner, Jan K Buitelaar, Kazima B Bulayeva, Wiepke Cahn, Vince D Calhoun, Dara M Cannon, Gianpiero L Cavalleri, Christopher Chen, Ching-Yu Cheng, Sven Cichon, Mark R Cookson, Aiden Corvin, Benedicto Crespo-Facorro, Joanne E Curran, Michael Czisch, Anders M Dale, Gareth E Davies, Eco J C De Geus, Philip L De Jager, Greig I de Zubicaray, Norman Delanty, Chantal Depondt, Anita L DeStefano, Allissa Dillman, Srdjan Djurovic, Gary Donohoe, Wayne C Drevets, Ravi Duggirala, Thomas D Dyer, Susanne Erk, Thomas Espeseth, Denis A Evans, Iryna O Fedko, Guillén Fernández, Luigi Ferrucci, Simon E Fisher, Debra A Fleischman, Ian Ford, Tatiana M Foroud, Peter T Fox, Clyde Francks, Masaki Fukunaga, J Raphael Gibbs, David C Glahn, Randy L Gollub, Harald H H Göring, Hans J Grabe, Robert C Green, Oliver Gruber, Vilmundur Gudnason, Sebastian Guelfi, Narelle K Hansell, John Hardy, Catharina A Hartman, Ryota Hashimoto, Katrin Hegenscheid, Andreas Heinz, Stephanie Le Hellard, Dena G Hernandez, Dirk J Heslenfeld, Beng-Choon Ho, Pieter J Hoekstra, Wolfgang Hoffmann, Albert Hofman, Florian Holsboer, Georg Homuth, Norbert Hosten, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, Hilleke E Hulshoff Pol, Masashi Ikeda, M Kamran Ikram, Clifford R Jack Jr, Mark Jenkinson, Robert Johnson, Erik G Jönsson, J Wouter Jukema, René S Kahn, Ryota Kanai, Iwona Kloszewska, David S Knopman, Peter Kochunov, John B Kwok, Stephen M Lawrie, Hervé Lemaître, Xinmin Liu, Dan L Longo, W T Longstreth Jr, Oscar L Lopez, Simon Lovestone, Oliver Martinez, Jean-Luc Martinot, Venkata S Mattay, Colm McDonald, Andrew M McIntosh, Katie L McMahon, Francis J McMahon, Patrizia Mecocci, Ingrid Melle, Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, Sebastian Mohnke, Grant W Montgomery, Derek W Morris, Thomas H Mosley, Thomas W Mühleisen, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Michael A Nalls, Matthias Nauck, Thomas E Nichols, Wiro J Niessen, Markus M Nöthen, Lars Nyberg, Kazutaka Ohi, Rene L Olvera, Roel A Ophoff, Massimo Pandolfo, Tomas Paus, Zdenka Pausova, Brenda W J H Penninx, G Bruce Pike, Steven G Potkin, Bruce M Psaty, Simone Reppermund, Marcella Rietschel, Joshua L Roffman, Nina Romanczuk-Seiferth, Jerome I Rotter, Mina Ryten, Ralph L Sacco, Perminder S Sachdev, Andrew J Saykin, Reinhold Schmidt, Peter R Schofield, Sigurdur Sigurdsson, Andy Simmons, Andrew Singleton, Sanjay M Sisodiya, Colin Smith, Jordan W Smoller, Hilkka Soininen, Velandai Srikanth, Vidar M Steen, David J Stott, Jessika E Sussmann, Anbupalam Thalamuthu, Henning Tiemeier, Arthur W Toga, Bryan J Traynor, Juan Troncoso, Jessica A Turner, Christophe Tzourio, Andre G Uitterlinden, Maria C Valdés Hernández, Marcel Van der Brug, Aad Van der Lugt, Nic J A Van der Wee, Cornelia M Van Duijn, Neeltje E M Van Haren, Dennis Van T Ent, Marie-Jose Van Tol, Badri N Vardarajan, Dick J Veltman, Meike W Vernooij, Henry Völzke, Henrik Walter, Joanna M Wardlaw, Thomas H Wassink, Michael E Weale, Daniel R Weinberger, Michael W Weiner, Wei Wen, Eric Westman, Tonya White, Tien Y Wong, Clinton B Wright, H Ronald Zielke, Alan B Zonderman, Ian J Deary, Charles DeCarli, Helena Schmidt, Nicholas G Martin, Anton J M De Craen, Margaret J Wright, Lenore J Launer, Gunter Schumann, Myriam Fornage, Barbara Franke, Stéphanie Debette, Sarah E Medland, M Arfan Ikram, Paul M Thompson
Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Ari S Morcos, Christopher D Harvey
We studied how the posterior parietal cortex combines new information with ongoing activity dynamics as mice accumulate evidence during a virtual navigation task. Using new methods to analyze population activity on single trials, we found that activity transitioned rapidly between different sets of active neurons. Each event in a trial, whether an evidence cue or a behavioral choice, caused seconds-long modifications to the probabilities that govern how one activity pattern transitions to the next, forming a short-term memory...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Melissa Mahgoub, Megumi Adachi, Kanzo Suzuki, Xihui Liu, Ege T Kavalali, Maria H Chahrour, Lisa M Monteggia
Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) Hdac1 and Hdac2 can associate together in protein complexes with transcriptional factors such as methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Given their high degree of sequence identity, we examined whether Hdac1 and Hdac2 were functionally redundant in mature mouse brain. We demonstrate that postnatal forebrain-specific deletion of both Hdac1 and Hdac2 in mice impacts neuronal survival and results in an excessive grooming phenotype caused by dysregulation of Sap90/Psd95-associated protein 3 (Sapap3; also known as Dlgap3) in striatum...
September 26, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Menachem Fromer, Panos Roussos, Solveig K Sieberts, Jessica S Johnson, David H Kavanagh, Thanneer M Perumal, Douglas M Ruderfer, Edwin C Oh, Aaron Topol, Hardik R Shah, Lambertus L Klei, Robin Kramer, Dalila Pinto, Zeynep H Gümüş, A Ercument Cicek, Kristen K Dang, Andrew Browne, Cong Lu, Lu Xie, Ben Readhead, Eli A Stahl, Jianqiu Xiao, Mahsa Parvizi, Tymor Hamamsy, John F Fullard, Ying-Chih Wang, Milind C Mahajan, Jonathan M J Derry, Joel T Dudley, Scott E Hemby, Benjamin A Logsdon, Konrad Talbot, Towfique Raj, David A Bennett, Philip L De Jager, Jun Zhu, Bin Zhang, Patrick F Sullivan, Andrew Chess, Shaun M Purcell, Leslie A Shinobu, Lara M Mangravite, Hiroyoshi Toyoshiba, Raquel E Gur, Chang-Gyu Hahn, David A Lewis, Vahram Haroutunian, Mette A Peters, Barbara K Lipska, Joseph D Buxbaum, Eric E Schadt, Keisuke Hirai, Kathryn Roeder, Kristen J Brennand, Nicholas Katsanis, Enrico Domenici, Bernie Devlin, Pamela Sklar
Over 100 genetic loci harbor schizophrenia-associated variants, yet how these variants confer liability is uncertain. The CommonMind Consortium sequenced RNA from dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of people with schizophrenia (N = 258) and control subjects (N = 279), creating a resource of gene expression and its genetic regulation. Using this resource, ∼20% of schizophrenia loci have variants that could contribute to altered gene expression and liability. In five loci, only a single gene was involved: FURIN, TSNARE1, CNTN4, CLCN3 or SNAP91...
September 26, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Akihiro Funamizu, Bernd Kuhn, Kenji Doya
Dynamic Bayesian inference allows a system to infer the environmental state under conditions of limited sensory observation. Using a goal-reaching task, we found that posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and adjacent posteromedial cortex (PM) implemented the two fundamental features of dynamic Bayesian inference: prediction of hidden states using an internal state transition model and updating the prediction with new sensory evidence. We optically imaged the activity of neurons in mouse PPC and PM layers 2, 3 and 5 in an acoustic virtual-reality system...
September 19, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
David E Koser, Amelia J Thompson, Sarah K Foster, Asha Dwivedy, Eva K Pillai, Graham K Sheridan, Hanno Svoboda, Matheus Viana, Luciano da F Costa, Jochen Guck, Christine E Holt, Kristian Franze
During nervous system development, neurons extend axons along well-defined pathways. The current understanding of axon pathfinding is based mainly on chemical signaling. However, growing neurons interact not only chemically but also mechanically with their environment. Here we identify mechanical signals as important regulators of axon pathfinding. In vitro, substrate stiffness determined growth patterns of Xenopus retinal ganglion cell axons. In vivo atomic force microscopy revealed a noticeable pattern of stiffness gradients in the embryonic brain...
September 19, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Karla L Miller, Fidel Alfaro-Almagro, Neal K Bangerter, David L Thomas, Essa Yacoub, Junqian Xu, Andreas J Bartsch, Saad Jbabdi, Stamatios N Sotiropoulos, Jesper L R Andersson, Ludovica Griffanti, Gwenaëlle Douaud, Thomas W Okell, Peter Weale, Iulius Dragonu, Steve Garratt, Sarah Hudson, Rory Collins, Mark Jenkinson, Paul M Matthews, Stephen M Smith
Medical imaging has enormous potential for early disease prediction, but is impeded by the difficulty and expense of acquiring data sets before symptom onset. UK Biobank aims to address this problem directly by acquiring high-quality, consistently acquired imaging data from 100,000 predominantly healthy participants, with health outcomes being tracked over the coming decades. The brain imaging includes structural, diffusion and functional modalities. Along with body and cardiac imaging, genetics, lifestyle measures, biological phenotyping and health records, this imaging is expected to enable discovery of imaging markers of a broad range of diseases at their earliest stages, as well as provide unique insight into disease mechanisms...
September 19, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
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