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Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993327/percutaneous-treatment-of-lymphatic-malformations
#1
REVIEW
Michael Acord, Abhay S Srinivasan, Anne Marie Cahill
Lymphatic malformations are slow-flow vascular anomalies composed of dilated lymphatic channels and cysts of varying sizes. Percutaneous treatments, particularly sclerotherapy, play an important role in the treatment of these lesions, often obviating the need for surgical intervention. Owing to the complex nature of these lesions, a multidisciplinary approach should be used to guide diagnosis and management. This submission focuses on the workup and treatment of pediatric lymphatic malformations at our institution, with a focus on sclerotherapy...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993326/interventional-treatment-of-pulmonary-lymphatic-anomalies
#2
REVIEW
Maxim Itkin
Pulmonary lymphatic diseases have been recognized for many years and have been referred as pulmonary lymphangiectasia, pulmonary lymphangiomatosis, plastic bronchitis, and idiopathic chylothorax or chylopericardium. The lymphatic etiology of these conditions has been determined by detection of cystic lymphatic structures on biopsy or postmortem examination. Development of new imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography has allowed better understanding of pathophysiology of these conditions...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993325/percutaneous-treatment-of-chylous-ascites
#3
REVIEW
Jinoo Kim, Je Hwan Won
Chylous ascites occurs as a result of lymphatic leakage, which contains high concentration of triglycerides. The leakage is caused by various benign or malignant etiologies ranging from congenital lymphatic abnormality to trauma. Lymphangiography has been shown to be effective in the diagnosis of lymphatic leakage and has also been reported to have therapeutic outcome. The development of intranodal technique for lymphangiography has recently made the procedure more widespread. As an adjunctive procedure, percutaneous embolization may be performed which involves use of embolic agents such as N-butyl cyanoacrylate and coil to occlude the leak...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993324/nontraumatic-chylothorax-diagnostic-algorithm-and-treatment-options
#4
REVIEW
Gregory Nadolski
Nontraumatic chylothorax is a relatively rare condition in which the intestinal lymph (chyle) leaks into the pleural cavity. Nontraumatic chylothorax is more difficult to treat than the more common traumatic chylothorax because the site of chylous leak may occur in less predictable locations. In the past, patients with nontraumatic chylothoraces were offered traditional fluoroscopically guided lymphangiography and thoracic duct embolization similar to traumatic chylothorax. However, the observation that thoracic duct embolization outcomes for nontraumatic chylothorax differed based on the imaging findings during lymphangiography has led to the development of a treatment algorithm, which incorporates noninvasive diagnostic studies, such as magnetic resonance lymphangiography...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993323/lymphangiography-for-thoracic-duct-interventions
#5
REVIEW
Michael S Stecker, Chieh-Min Fan
Lymph leaks resulting in chylous pleural effusions can be life-threatening. Minimally invasive thoracic duct embolization and disruption have been gaining acceptance as first-line treatment for these leaks. This review discusses the techniques for both pedal and intranodal lymphangiography in detail. It also discusses the use of lymphangiography as a means of targeting a retroperitoneal lymphatic to facilitate thoracic duct interventions for chyle leaks. Finally, outcomes and adverse events pertaining to these thoracic duct interventions are discussed...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993322/lymphoscintigraphy-for-imaging-of-the-lymphatic-flow-disorders
#6
REVIEW
Rie Yagi Yoshida, Shuji Kariya, Sangkil Ha-Kawa, Noboru Tanigawa
Lymphoscintigraphy has introduced with the great advantage for diagnostic imaging of the lymphatic flow disorders. Lymphoscintigraphy can be performed in patients of any age, including neonates, and even in patient in critical conditions. The procedure is quite simple, and it needs only subcutaneous injection of small amounts of radiotracers. From subcutaneous tissue the radiotracer is taken by the lymphatic vessels and gives off energy in the form of gamma radiation detected by a gamma camera. Radiotracers rarely cause the allergic reaction and can be administered to the patients with allergy to iodine contrast media...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993321/peripheral-magnetic-resonance-lymphangiography-techniques-and-applications
#7
REVIEW
Lee M Mitsumori, Elizabeth S McDonald, Peter C Neligan, Jeffrey H Maki
Peripheral lymphedema is a chronic progressive and debilitating disorder that results from abnormal lymphatic drainage. Advances in microsurgical techniques have led to the development of new treatment options for lymphedema that benefit from preoperative imaging to select the most appropriate surgical repair. Magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography is a noninvasive imaging modality capable of providing high-resolution 3D images of the lower extremities to define the severity and extent of lymphedema and depict individual lymphatic channels...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993320/novel-lymphatic-imaging-techniques
#8
REVIEW
Yoav Dori
The lymphatic system plays an important role in immune regulation, transport of metabolites, and fluid balance. The key circulatory role of the lymphatic system is to transport fluid from tissue back into the venous system via lymphovenous connections. Despite the centuries-old recognition of this key role, there has been poor understanding of lymphatic flow pathophysiology because of a lack of a simple reliable noninvasive clinical lymphatic imaging method. This lack of clinical imaging has limited the treatment options for patients with lymphatic flow disorders...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993319/lymphatic-anatomy
#9
REVIEW
Michael C Hsu, Maxim Itkin
Recent development of new lymphatic imaging and intervention techniques, such as intranodal lymphangiogram, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance lymphangiography and lymphatic embolization, have resulted in the resurgence of interest in the lymphatic anatomy. The lymphatic system is a continuous maze of interlacing vessels and lymph nodes and is extremely complex and variable. This presents a significant challenge for interpretation of imaging and performance of interventions on this system. There is an embryological reason for this complexity and variability; the lymphatic system sprouts off of primordia from several locations in the body, which later fuse together at different stages of development of the embryo...
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27993318/introduction
#10
EDITORIAL
Maxim Itkin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641458/kidney-ureter-and-bladder-biopsy
#11
REVIEW
Aoife Kilcoyne, Debra A Gervais
Percutaneous urologic biopsy is a safe and effective technique and can comprise a significant proportion of the daily workload of the interventional radiologist. This article discusses the indications and rationale for the performance of renal, ureter, and bladder biopsy as well as the approach to performing such biopsies, pitfalls, and potential complications.
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641457/interventional-management-of-vascular-renal-transplant-complications
#12
REVIEW
Kanti Pallav Kolli, Jeanne M LaBerge
Renal transplantation is the therapy of choice in patients with end stage renal disease. Although transplant rejection remains the most common complication after renal transplantation, vascular anatomical complications occur in 1%-23% of renal transplant recipients. Interventional radiologists play an important role in the management of these complications. This review discusses the role of image-guided interventions within the context of multidisciplinary patient management. Particular emphasis is given to anatomical considerations unique to this patient population, techniques used for image-guided interventions, and outcomes of image-guided interventions...
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641456/interventional-management-of-nonvascular-renal-transplant-complications
#13
REVIEW
Kanti Pallav Kolli, Jeanne M LaBerge
Nonvascular complications represent a significant source of morbidity following renal transplantation and can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Postoperative problems include urinary tract obstruction or leakage and the development of peritransplant fluid collections. Interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients. Image-guided interventions are used to identify the underlying anatomical problem, relieve immediate symptoms, and allow planning for long-term resolution. In this article, we review the urinary tract anatomy relevant to renal transplantation, procedural techniques for image-guided urinary tract interventions and interventions on peritransplant fluid collections, and expected outcomes following image-guided interventions...
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641455/management-of-renovascular-hypertension
#14
REVIEW
Aaron Smith, Ron C Gaba, James T Bui, Jeet Minocha
Renal artery stenosis is a potentially reversible cause of hypertension, and transcatheter techniques are essential to its treatment. Angioplasty remains a first-line treatment for stenosis secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia. Renal artery stenting is commonly used in atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, although recent trials have cast doubts upon its efficacy. Renal denervation is a promising procedure for the treatment of resistant hypertension, and in the future, its indications may expand.
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641454/arterial-embolization-for-the-treatment-of-renal-masses-and-traumatic-renal-injuries
#15
REVIEW
Raja S Ramaswamy, Michael D Darcy
Renal artery embolization (RAE) for a variety of indications has been performed for several decades. RAE techniques have been refined over time for clinical efficacy and a more favorable safety profile. Owing to improved catheters, embolic agents for precise delivery, and clinical experience, RAE is increasingly used as an adjunct to, or as the preferred alternative to surgical interventions. The indications for RAE are expanding for many urologic and medical conditions. In this article, we focus on the role and technical aspects of RAE in the treatment of renal masses and traumatic renal injuries...
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641453/managing-complications-following-nephron-sparing-procedures-for-renal-masses
#16
REVIEW
Adrian J Gonzalez-Aguirre, Jeremy C Durack
Small renal malignancies are commonly treated with nephron-sparing procedures including partial nephrectomy and percutaneous ablation. Although these procedures offer faster patient recovery and preserve renal function, a variety of complications can occur. Here, we review vascular and nonvascular complications associated with nephron-sparing renal mass treatments and discuss options for minimally invasive image-guided management.
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641452/ureteral-interventions
#17
REVIEW
Allen Herr, Anuj Malhotra, Mark White, Gary Siskin
Interventional radiologists are commonly called upon to manage patients with benign and malignant ureteral pathologic conditions. Unfortunately, treatments for both cure and palliation can be fraught with problems causing patients to be undesirably maintained with lifelong catheters. This review describes outcomes for antegrade and retrograde therapeutic options and techniques for patients with most types of ureteral pathologic conditions that the interventional radiologist would encounter in practice.
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641451/urinary-drainage-procedures-in-interventional-radiology
#18
REVIEW
Raymond H Thornton, Anne M Covey
Urinary drainage procedures are used to treat a wide range of clinical situations including pyonephrosis, preservation of renal function in patients with ureteral obstruction, as a means to access the collecting system for stone retrieval or lithotripsy and to divert urine from a distal leak or fistula. Several different drainage devices are available and include those that provide obligatory external drainage (nephrostomy), both internal and external drainage (nephroureteral stent) and internal drainage (double-J stent)...
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27641450/introduction
#19
EDITORIAL
Jeremy C Durack, Anne M Covey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27423998/lumbar-sympathetic-neurolysis-how-to-and-when-to-use
#20
Joseph J Zechlinski, Robert A Hieb
Lumbar sympathectomy was historically a mainstay of treatment for arterial occlusive disease and other vasospastic disorders, before the development of contemporary arterial reconstructive procedures either by surgical or endovascular means. Today, percutaneous methods of sympathetic blockade are possible using chemical neurolytic or ablative modalities. Lumbar sympathetic neurolysis is generally reserved for those patients with ischemic rest pain in the setting of nonreconstructable arterial occlusive disease, although patients with complex regional pain syndrome, peripheral neuralgia, vasospastic disorders, and various other disease states such as plantar hyperhydrosis may also benefit...
June 2016: Techniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
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