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Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351759/tracheal-intubation-in-critically-ill-patients-a-comprehensive-systematic-review-of-randomized-trials
#1
Luca Cabrini, Giovanni Landoni, Martina Baiardo Radaelli, Omar Saleh, Carmine D Votta, Evgeny Fominskiy, Alessandro Putzu, Cézar Daniel Snak de Souza, Massimo Antonelli, Rinaldo Bellomo, Paolo Pelosi, Alberto Zangrillo
BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled studies evaluating any drug, technique or device aimed at improving the success rate or safety of tracheal intubation in the critically ill. METHODS: We searched PubMed, BioMed Central, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials and references of retrieved articles. Finally, pertinent reviews were also scanned to detect further studies until May 2017. The following inclusion criteria were considered: tracheal intubation in adult critically ill patients; randomized controlled trial; study performed in Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department or ordinary ward; and work published in the last 20 years...
January 20, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351760/glycaemic-control-targets-after-traumatic-brain-injury-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#2
Jeroen Hermanides, Mark P Plummer, Mark Finnis, Adam M Deane, Jonathan P Coles, David K Menon
BACKGROUND: Optimal glycaemic targets in traumatic brain injury (TBI) remain unclear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing intensive with conventional glycaemic control in TBI requiring admission to an intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to November 2016. Outcomes of interest included ICU and in-hospital mortality, poor neurological outcome, the incidence of hypoglycaemia and infective complications...
January 19, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29347994/the-apelinergic-system-as-an-alternative-to-catecholamines-in-low-output-septic-shock
#3
David Coquerel, Xavier Sainsily, Lauralyne Dumont, Philippe Sarret, Éric Marsault, Mannix Auger-Messier, Olivier Lesur
Catecholamines, in concert with fluid resuscitation, have long been recommended in the management of septic shock. However, not all patients respond positively and controversy surrounding the efficacy-to-safety profile of catecholamines has emerged, trending toward decatecholaminization. Contextually, it is time to re-examine the "maintaining blood pressure" paradigm by identifying safer and life-saving alternatives. We put in perspective the emerging and growing knowledge on a promising alternative avenue: the apelinergic system...
January 19, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29347987/determinants-of-long-term-outcome-in-icu-survivors-results-from-the-frog-icu-study
#4
Etienne Gayat, Alain Cariou, Nicolas Deye, Antoine Vieillard-Baron, Samir Jaber, Charles Damoisel, Qin Lu, Xavier Monnet, Isabelle Rennuit, Elie Azoulay, Marc Léone, Heikel Oueslati, Bertrand Guidet, Diane Friedman, Antoine Tesnière, Romain Sonneville, Philippe Montravers, Sébastien Pili-Floury, Jean-Yves Lefrant, Jacques Duranteau, Pierre-François Laterre, Nicolas Brechot, Karine Chevreul, Morgane Michel, Bernard Cholley, Matthieu Legrand, Jean-Marie Launay, Eric Vicaut, Mervyn Singer, Matthieu Resche-Rigon, Alexandre Mebazaa
BACKGROUND: Intensive care unit (ICU) survivors have reduced long-term survival compared to the general population. Identifying parameters at ICU discharge that are associated with poor long-term outcomes may prove useful in targeting an at-risk population. The main objective of the study was to identify clinical and biological determinants of death in the year following ICU discharge. METHODS: FROG-ICU was a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study of ICU survivors followed 1 year after discharge, including 21 medical, surgical or mixed ICUs in France and Belgium...
January 18, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29347982/emergency-department-hyperoxia-is-associated-with-increased-mortality-in-mechanically-ventilated-patients-a-cohort-study
#5
David Page, Enyo Ablordeppey, Brian T Wessman, Nicholas M Mohr, Stephen Trzeciak, Marin H Kollef, Brian W Roberts, Brian M Fuller
BACKGROUND: Providing supplemental oxygen is fundamental in the management of mechanically ventilated patients. Increasing amounts of data show worse clinical outcomes associated with hyperoxia. However, these previous data in the critically ill have not focused on outcomes associated with brief hyperoxia exposure immediately after endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the impact of isolated early hyperoxia exposure in the emergency department (ED) on clinical outcomes among mechanically ventilated patients with subsequent normoxia in the intensive care unit (ICU)...
January 18, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29343292/global-trends-in-the-awareness-of-sepsis-insights-from-search-engine-data-between-2012-and-2017
#6
Craig S Jabaley, James M Blum, Robert F Groff, Vikas N O'Reilly-Shah
BACKGROUND: Sepsis is an established global health priority with high mortality that can be curtailed through early recognition and intervention; as such, efforts to raise awareness are potentially impactful and increasingly common. We sought to characterize trends in the awareness of sepsis by examining temporal, geographic, and other changes in search engine utilization for sepsis information-seeking online. METHODS: Using time series analyses and mixed descriptive methods, we retrospectively analyzed publicly available global usage data reported by Google Trends (Google, Palo Alto, CA, USA) concerning web searches for the topic of sepsis between 24 June 2012 and 24 June 2017...
January 17, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29338772/incidence-risk-factors-and-impact-of-protocolised-care-on-exposure-keratopathy-in-critically-ill-adults-a-two-phase-prospective-cohort-study
#7
Obaid Kousha, Zubaid Kousha, Jonathan Paddle
BACKGROUND: Exposure keratopathy (EK) has a high incidence in critically ill patients. We aimed to determine the rate of EK in patients admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU), identify risk factors for developing EK and ascertain the effectiveness of a protocol to prevent EK. METHODS: We undertook a two-phase prospective cohort single-centre study in a general adult ICU. The first phase of the study was observational. In the second phase of the study an eye care protocol was introduced...
January 16, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29335014/cost-effectiveness-study-of-early-versus-late-parenteral-nutrition-in-critically-ill-children-pepanic-preplanned-secondary-analysis-of-a-multicentre-randomised-controlled-trial
#8
Esther van Puffelen, Suzanne Polinder, Ilse Vanhorebeek, Pieter Jozef Wouters, Niek Bossche, Guido Peers, Sören Verstraete, Koen Felix Maria Joosten, Greet Van den Berghe, Sascha Cornelis Antonius Theodorus Verbruggen, Dieter Mesotten
BACKGROUND: The multicentre randomised controlled PEPaNIC trial showed that withholding parenteral nutrition (PN) during the first week of critical illness in children was clinically superior to providing early PN. This study describes the cost-effectiveness of this new nutritional strategy. METHODS: Direct medical costs were calculated with use of a micro-costing approach. We compared the costs of late versus early initiation of PN (n = 673 versus n = 670 patients) in the Belgian and Dutch study populations from a hospital perspective, using Student's t test with bootstrapping...
January 15, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325586/high-frequency-percussive-ventilation-increases-alveolar-recruitment-in-early-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-an-experimental-physiological-and-ct-scan-study
#9
Thomas Godet, Matthieu Jabaudon, Raïko Blondonnet, Aymeric Tremblay, Jules Audard, Benjamin Rieu, Bruno Pereira, Jean-Marc Garcier, Emmanuel Futier, Jean-Michel Constantin
BACKGROUND: High frequency percussive ventilation (HFPV) combines diffusive (high frequency mini-bursts) and convective ventilation patterns. Benefits include enhanced oxygenation and hemodynamics, and alveolar recruitment, while providing hypothetic lung-protective ventilation. No study has investigated HFPV-induced changes in lung aeration in patients with early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: Eight patients with early non-focal ARDS were enrolled and five swine with early non-focal ARDS were studied in prospective computed tomography (CT) scan and animal studies, in a university-hospital tertiary ICU and an animal laboratory...
January 11, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29304846/developing-a-feasible-and-valid-scoring-system-for-critically-ill-patients-in-resource-limited-settings
#10
LETTER
Gentle Sunder Shrestha
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 5, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29301549/icu-acquired-weakness-should-medical-sovereignty-belong-to-any-specialist
#11
Domenico Intiso
ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW), including critical illness polyneuropathy, critical illness myopathy, and critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, is a frequent disabling disorder in ICU subjects. Research has predominantly been performed by intensivists, whose efforts have permitted the diagnosis of ICUAW early during an ICU stay and understanding of several of the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of this disorder. Despite important progress, the therapeutic strategies are unsatisfactory and issues such as functional outcomes and long-term recovery remain unclear...
January 4, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29287599/ultrasound-guided-central-venous-catheter-placement-first-things-first
#12
LETTER
Bernd Saugel, Leonie Schulte-Uentrop, Thomas W L Scheeren, Jean-Louis Teboul
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 29, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284503/bronchoscopy-versus-an-endotracheal-tube-mounted-camera-for-the-peri-interventional-visualization-of-percutaneous-dilatational-tracheostomy-a-prospective-randomized-trial-vivapdt
#13
Jörn Grensemann, Lars Eichler, Sophie Kähler, Dominik Jarczak, Marcel Simon, Hans O Pinnschmidt, Stefan Kluge
BACKGROUND: Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) in critically ill patients often involves bronchoscopic optical guidance. However, this procedure is not without disadvantages. Therefore, we aimed to study a recently introduced endotracheal tube-mounted camera (VivaSightTM-SL tube [VST]; ETView, Misgav, Israel) for guiding PDT. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial involving 46 critically ill patients who received PDT using optical guidance with a VST or with bronchoscopy...
December 29, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297400/seven-unconfirmed-ideas-to-improve-future-icu-practice
#14
REVIEW
John J Marini, Daniel De Backer, Can Ince, Mervyn Singer, Frank Van Haren, Martin Westphal, Paul Wischmeyer
With imprecise definitions, inexact measurement tools, and flawed study execution, our clinical science often lags behind bedside experience and simply documents what appear to be the apparent faults or validity of ongoing practices. These impressions are later confirmed, modified, or overturned by the results of the next trial. On the other hand, insights that stem from the intuitions of experienced clinicians, scientists and educators-while often neglected-help place current thinking into proper perspective and occasionally point the way toward formulating novel hypotheses that direct future research...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297399/the-coming-era-of-precision-medicine-for-intensive-care
#15
REVIEW
Jean-Louis Vincent
Recent advances in technology and better understanding of mechanisms underlying disease are beginning to enable us to better characterize critically ill patients. Instead of using nonspecific syndromic groupings, such as sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome, we can now classify individual patients according to various specific characteristics, such as immune status. This "personalized" medicine approach will enable us to distinguish patients who have similar clinical presentations but different cellular and molecular responses that will influence their need for and responses (both negative and positive) to specific treatments...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297397/time-sensitive-therapeutics
#16
REVIEW
John J Marini
Much of what we now do in Critical Care carries an air of urgency, a pressing need to discover and act, with priorities biased toward a reactive response. However, efficacy often depends not simply upon what we do, but rather on whether, when, and how persistently we intervene. The practice of medicine is based upon diagnosis, integration of multiple sources of information, keen judgment, and appropriate intervention. Timing may not be everything, as the well-known adage suggests, but in the intensive care unit (ICU) timing issues clearly deserve more attention than they are currently given...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297391/personalized-physiological-medicine
#17
REVIEW
Can Ince
This paper introduces the concept of personalized physiological medicine that is specifically directed at the needs of the critically ill patient. This differs from the conventional view of personalized medicine, characterized by biomarkers and gene profiling, instead focusing on time-variant changes in the pathophysiology and regulation of various organ systems and their cellular and subcellular constituents. I propose that personalized physiological medicine is composed of four pillars relevant to the critically ill patient...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297387/personalised-fluid-resuscitation-in-the-icu-still-a-fluid-concept
#18
REVIEW
Frank van Haren
The administration of intravenous fluid to critically ill patients is one of the most common, but also one of the most fiercely debated, interventions in intensive care medicine. Even though many thousands of patients have been enrolled in large trials of alternative fluid strategies, consensus remains elusive and practice is widely variable. Critically ill patients are significantly heterogeneous, making a one size fits all approach unlikely to be successful.New data from basic, animal, and clinical research suggest that fluid resuscitation could be associated with significant harm...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297385/tailoring-nutrition-therapy-to-illness-and-recovery
#19
REVIEW
Paul E Wischmeyer
Without doubt, in medicine as in life, one size does not fit all. We do not administer the same drug or dose to every patient at all times, so why then would we live under the illusion that we should give the same nutrition at all times in the continuum of critical illness? We have long lived under the assumption that critical illness and trauma lead to a consistent early increase in metabolic/caloric need, the so-called "hypermetabolism" of critical illness. What if this is incorrect? Recent data indicate that early underfeeding of calories (trophic feeding) may have benefits and may require consideration in well-nourished patients...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297372/detailing-the-cardiovascular-profile-in-shock-patients
#20
REVIEW
Daniel De Backer
Evaluation of the cardiovascular profile of critically ill patients is one of the most important actions performed in critically ill patients. It allows recognition that the patient is in shock and characterization of the type of circulatory failure. This step is crucial to initiate supportive interventions and to cure the cause responsible for the development of shock. Evaluation of tissue perfusion allows identification of the patient insufficiently resuscitated and also to trigger therapeutic interventions...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
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