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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649862/the-role-of-sociocultural-perspectives-in-eating-disorder-treatment-a-study-of-health-professionals
#1
Su Holmes
Eating disorders are now often approached as biopsychosocial problems, because they are widely recognised as multifactorial in origin. However, it has been suggested that there is a substantial and unwarranted imbalance within this biopsychosocial framework, with the 'social' aspects of the equation relegated to secondary or facilitating factors within treatment contexts. Drawing on data from 12 qualitative interviews with health professionals in a UK region, this article examines the extent to which sociocultural perspectives on eating disorders are valued and explored in eating disorder treatment, with a particular focus on the relationship between eating disorders and gender...
June 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649859/medical-authority-managerial-power-and-political-will-a-bourdieusian-analysis-of-antibiotics-in-the-hospital
#2
Emma Kirby, Alex Broom, Alexandra Gibson, Jennifer Broom, Trent Yarwood, Jeffrey Post
Antibiotic resistance poses a significant global threat, yet clinically inappropriate antibiotic use within hospitals continues despite the implementation of abatement strategies. Antibiotic use and the viability of existing antibiotic options now sit precariously at the nexus of political will, institutional governance and clinical priorities 'at the bedside'. Yet no study has hitherto explored the perspectives of managers, instead of focusing on clinicians. In this article, drawing on qualitative interviews with hospital managers, we explore accounts of responding to antimicrobial resistance, managing antibiotic governance and negotiating clinical and managerial priorities...
June 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28637363/-think-positively-parkinson-s-disease-biomedicine-and-hope-in-contemporary-germany
#3
Ingrid Metzler, Paul Just
Narratives of hope shape contemporary engagements with Parkinson's disease. On the one hand, a "biomedical narrative of hope" promises that biomedical research will help to transform this treatable but incurable disease into a curable one in the future. On the other hand, a more individual "illness narrative of hope" encourages patients to influence the course of Parkinson's disease by practicing self-care and positive thinking. This article asks how these two narratives of hope interact. It bases its argument on an analysis of data from 13 focus groups conducted in Germany in 2012 and 2014 with patients with Parkinson's disease and their relatives...
June 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28637360/who-or-what-has-agency-in-the-discussion-of-antimicrobial-resistance-in-uk-news-media-2010-2015-a-transitivity-analysis
#4
Luke Curtis Collins, Rusi Jaspal, Brigitte Nerlich
The increase in infections resistant to the existing antimicrobial medicines has become a topic of concern for health professionals, policy makers and publics across the globe; however, among the public there is a sense that this is an issue beyond their control. Research has shown that the news media can have a significant role to play in the public's understanding of science and medicine. In this article, we respond to a call by research councils in the United Kingdom to study antibiotic or antimicrobial resistance as a social phenomenon by providing a linguistic analysis of reporting on this issue in the UK press...
June 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28629224/-it-s-not-my-business-exploring-heteronormativity-in-young-people-s-discourses-about-lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender-and-queer-issues-and-their-implications-for-youth-health-and-wellbeing
#5
Cara Ky Ng, Rebecca J Haines-Saah, Rodney E Knight, Jean A Shoveller, Joy L Johnson
In Canada, the issue of creating safe and inclusive school environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer students has been in the spotlight. Several researchers and advocates have pointed out the positive effects of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer-positive policy frameworks on the health and wellbeing of all young people. In this article, we take a critical approach to analyzing narrative findings from qualitative interviews conducted with youth in three communities in British Columbia, Canada: "the North," Vancouver, and Abbotsford...
June 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28552003/-i-m-only-dealing-with-the-acute-issues-how-medical-ward-busyness-constrains-care-of-the-dying
#6
Lisa S Chan, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Franco A Carnevale, S Robin Cohen
Acute hospital units are a common location of death. Curative characteristics of the acute medical setting make it difficult to provide adequate palliative care; these characteristics include an orientation to life-prolonging treatment, an emphasis on routine or task-oriented care and a lack of priority on emotional engagement with patients. Indeed, research shows that dying patients in acute medical units often experience unmet needs at the end of life, including uncontrolled symptoms (e.g. pain, breathlessness), inadequate emotional support and poor communication...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28537093/facilitating-resident-community-in-nursing-homes-a-slippery-slope-an-analysis-on-collectivistic-and-individualistic-approaches
#7
Gudmund Ågotnes, Christine Øye
Residents in nursing homes are old and frail and are dependent on constant care, medical, or otherwise, by trained professionals. But they are also social beings, secluded in an institutional setting which is both total and foreign. In this setting, most of the residents most of the time must relate to other residents: other residents are the nursing home residents' peers, companions, and perhaps even significant others. In this article, we will discuss how resident communities in nursing homes are influenced by the approaches of nursing home staff...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523938/-it-was-like-i-had-to-fit-into-a-category-care-seekers-experiences-of-gender-regulation-in-the-swedish-trans-specific-healthcare
#8
Ida Linander, Erika Alm, Isabel Goicolea, Lisa Harryson
The few previous studies investigating regulation of gender in trans-specific healthcare are mainly based on text material and interviews with care-providers or consist solely of theoretical analyses. There is a lack of studies analysing how the regulation of gender is expressed in the care-seeker's own experiences, especially in a Nordic context. The aim of this study is to analyse narratives of individuals with trans experiences (sometimes called transgender people) to examine how gender performances can be regulated in trans-specific care in Sweden...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28516801/representations-of-mental-health-and-arts-participation-in-the-national-and-local-british-press-2007-2015
#9
Dimitrinka Atanasova, Nelya Koteyko, Brian Brown, Paul Crawford
We analysed news articles published in national and local British newspapers between 2007 and 2015 to understand (1) how mental health and arts participation were framed and (2) how the relationships between participants in arts initiatives were conceptualised. Using corpus-assisted qualitative frame analysis, we identified frames of recovery, stigma and economy. The recovery frame, which emphasised that mental illness can be treated similarly to physical illness, positioned arts participation as a form of therapy that can complement or substitute medication...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521650/-why-worry-about-something-you-can-t-control-negotiated-risk-longevity-and-health-behaviours
#10
Rebecca Llewellyn, Wayne Cunningham, Chrystal Jaye, Jessica Young, Richard Egan, Peter Radue
While we know about lay attitudes towards death and dying, we understand little about the ways people estimate their overall personal risk of life-limiting disease and/or death. This study contributes to the limited literature on lay longevity reckonings, with a particular focus on how these reckonings may influence health behaviours. Semi-structured interviews were held with 21 young older adults (54-65 years), addressing the core questions of 'What do you think you will die from, and how long do you expect to live?' Participants indicated their longevity estimation was guided by three key frameworks: family history, environment and lifestyle factors and lived experience...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521649/-am-i-really-gonna-go-sixty-years-without-getting-cancer-again-uncertainty-and-liminality-in-young-women-s-accounts-of-living-with-a-history-of-breast-cancer
#11
Sophie Rees
Although much research has examined the experience of breast cancer, the distinctive perspectives and lives of young women have been relatively neglected. Women diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 45, and who had completed their initial treatment, were interviewed, and social constructionist grounded theory methods were used to analyse the data. The end of initial treatment was accompanied by a sense of unease and uncertainty in relation to recurrence and survival, and also fertility and menopausal status...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521648/an-exploratory-study-of-the-experience-of-fibromyalgia-diagnosis-in-south-africa
#12
Silvie Cooper, Leah Gilbert
Within the conceptual framework of 'medically-ill-defined' conditions, this article focuses on the experiences of 'diagnosis' through a narrative analysis of fibromyalgia (a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder) in South Africa. In-depth interviews were used to collect narratives from 15 participants. The findings show how the contested and confusing experience of fibromyalgia diagnosis can be understood, by viewing the interactions that patients have with their practitioners, families, peers and colleagues...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521647/a-qualitative-investigation-of-lay-perspectives-of-diagnosis-and-self-management-strategies-employed-by-people-with-progressive-multiple-sclerosis
#13
Julia Frost, Jane Grose, Nicky Britten
This article explores how people with progressive multiple sclerosis give meaning to their experiences. It builds upon the self-management literature, which has captured the tension between the desire for retaining normalcy and the increasing burden of self-management associated with chronic disease progression. This repeat interview study is empirically grounded in 28 interviews with 14 people with progressive multiple sclerosis. We identified gender differences in diagnosis-seeking which impacted subsequent sense-making...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28177273/-you-feel-like-your-whole-world-is-caving-in-a-qualitative-study-of-primary-care-patients-conceptualisations-of-emotional-distress
#14
Adam Wa Geraghty, Miriam Santer, Samantha Williams, Jennifer Mc Sharry, Paul Little, Ricardo F Muñoz, Tony Kendrick, Michael Moore
General practitioners are tasked with determining the nature of patients' emotional distress and providing appropriate care. For patients whose symptoms appear to fall near the 'boundaries' of psychiatric disorder, this can be difficult with important implications for treatment. There is a lack of qualitative research among patients with symptoms severe enough to warrant consultation, but where general practitioners have refrained from diagnosis. We aimed to explore how patients in this potentially large group conceptualise their symptoms and consequently investigate lay understandings of complex distinctions between emotional distress and psychiatric disorder...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28135864/-naloxone-works-the-politics-of-knowledge-in-evidence-based-drug-policy
#15
Kari Lancaster, Carla Treloar, Alison Ritter
For over 20 years, drug policy experts have been calling for the wider availability of naloxone, to enable lay overdose witnesses to respond to opioid overdose events. However, the 'evidence base' for peer-administered naloxone has become a key point of contention. This contention opens up critical questions about how knowledge ('evidence') is constituted and validated in drug policy processes, which voices may be heard, and how knowledge producers secure privileged positions of influence. Taking the debate surrounding peer-administered naloxone as a case study, and drawing on qualitative interviews with individuals (n = 19) involved in the development of naloxone policy in Australia, we examine how particular kinds of knowledge are rendered 'useful' in drug policy debates...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504005/how-do-health-behaviour-interventions-take-account-of-social-context-a-literature-trend-and-co-citation-analysis
#16
Daniel Holman, Rebecca Lynch, Aaron Reeves
In recent years, health behaviour interventions have received a great deal of attention in both research and policy as a means of encouraging people to lead healthier lives. The emphasis of such interventions has varied over time, in terms of level of intervention (e.g. individual vs community) and drawing on different disciplinary perspectives. Recently, a number of critiques have focused on how health behaviour interventions sometimes sideline issues of social context, framing health as a matter of individual choice and, by implication, a personal responsibility...
March 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401812/-listen-to-your-body-participants-alternative-to-science-in-online-health-discussions
#17
Wytske Versteeg, Hedwig Te Molder, Petra Sneijder
We present a discursive psychological analysis of how the idiomatic expression "Listen to Your Body" is deployed in online forum discussions about ADHD medication and aspartame. The Listen to Your Body device allows participants to demonstrate to others that they take their health seriously and for that reason avoid scientific knowledge. They contrast Listen to Your Body with "blindly following science," presenting Listen to Your Body as the more critical and, therefore, more rational behavior. Instead of treating the idiomatic expression as "anyone's knowledge," speakers and recipients compete for the right to own it...
March 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26655326/when-choice-becomes-limited-women-s-experiences-of-delay-in-labour
#18
Natalie Armstrong, Sara Kenyon
Choice and patient involvement in decision-making are strong aspirations of contemporary healthcare. One of the most striking areas in which this is played out is maternity care where recent policy has focused on choice and supporting normal birth. However, birth is sometimes not straightforward and unanticipated complications can rapidly reduce choice. We draw on the accounts of women who experienced delay during labour with their first child. This occurs when progress is slow, and syntocinon is administered to strengthen and regulate contractions...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26487687/the-consent-process-enabling-or-disabling-patients-active-participation
#19
Carole Doherty, Charitini Stavropoulou, Mark Nk Saunders, Tracey Brown
Standards expected by doctors' regulatory bodies in respect of the process of consent to treatment have arguably sought to restructure the nature of the doctor-patient relationship from one of the paternalism to that of shared decision-making. Yet, few studies have explored empirically, from patients' perspectives, the extent to which the process of consent to treatment enables or disables patients' participation in medical decision-making. Our article examines patients' attitudes towards the consent process, exploring how and why these attitudes influence patients' active participation in decision-making and considering possible consequent medico-legal issues...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26216897/online-self-expression-and-experimentation-as-reflectivism-using-text-analytics-to-examine-the-participatory-forum-hello-sunday-morning
#20
Nicholas Carah, Carla Meurk, Daniel Angus
Hello Sunday Morning is an online health promotion organisation that began in 2009. Hello Sunday Morning asks participants to stop consuming alcohol for a period of time, set a goal and document their progress on a personal blog. Hello Sunday Morning is a unique health intervention for three interrelated reasons: (1) it was generated outside a clinical setting, (2) it uses new media technologies to create structured forms of participation in an iterative and open-ended way and (3) participants generate a written record of their progress along with demographic, behavioural and engagement data...
March 2017: Health (London)
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