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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523938/-it-was-like-i-had-to-fit-into-a-category-care-seekers-experiences-of-gender-regulation-in-the-swedish-trans-specific-healthcare
#1
Ida Linander, Erika Alm, Isabel Goicolea, Lisa Harryson
The few previous studies investigating regulation of gender in trans-specific healthcare are mainly based on text material and interviews with care-providers or consist solely of theoretical analyses. There is a lack of studies analysing how the regulation of gender is expressed in the care-seeker's own experiences, especially in a Nordic context. The aim of this study is to analyse narratives of individuals with trans experiences (sometimes called transgender people) to examine how gender performances can be regulated in trans-specific care in Sweden...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28516801/representations-of-mental-health-and-arts-participation-in-the-national-and-local-british-press-2007-2015
#2
Dimitrinka Atanasova, Nelya Koteyko, Brian Brown, Paul Crawford
We analysed news articles published in national and local British newspapers between 2007 and 2015 to understand (1) how mental health and arts participation were framed and (2) how the relationships between participants in arts initiatives were conceptualised. Using corpus-assisted qualitative frame analysis, we identified frames of recovery, stigma and economy. The recovery frame, which emphasised that mental illness can be treated similarly to physical illness, positioned arts participation as a form of therapy that can complement or substitute medication...
May 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504005/how-do-health-behaviour-interventions-take-account-of-social-context-a-literature-trend-and-co-citation-analysis
#3
Daniel Holman, Rebecca Lynch, Aaron Reeves
In recent years, health behaviour interventions have received a great deal of attention in both research and policy as a means of encouraging people to lead healthier lives. The emphasis of such interventions has varied over time, in terms of level of intervention (e.g. individual vs community) and drawing on different disciplinary perspectives. Recently, a number of critiques have focused on how health behaviour interventions sometimes sideline issues of social context, framing health as a matter of individual choice and, by implication, a personal responsibility...
March 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401812/-listen-to-your-body-participants-alternative-to-science-in-online-health-discussions
#4
Wytske Versteeg, Hedwig Te Molder, Petra Sneijder
We present a discursive psychological analysis of how the idiomatic expression "Listen to Your Body" is deployed in online forum discussions about ADHD medication and aspartame. The Listen to Your Body device allows participants to demonstrate to others that they take their health seriously and for that reason avoid scientific knowledge. They contrast Listen to Your Body with "blindly following science," presenting Listen to Your Body as the more critical and, therefore, more rational behavior. Instead of treating the idiomatic expression as "anyone's knowledge," speakers and recipients compete for the right to own it...
March 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521650/-why-worry-about-something-you-can-t-control-negotiated-risk-longevity-and-health-behaviours
#5
Rebecca Llewellyn, Wayne Cunningham, Chrystal Jaye, Jessica Young, Richard Egan, Peter Radue
While we know about lay attitudes towards death and dying, we understand little about the ways people estimate their overall personal risk of life-limiting disease and/or death. This study contributes to the limited literature on lay longevity reckonings, with a particular focus on how these reckonings may influence health behaviours. Semi-structured interviews were held with 21 young older adults (54-65 years), addressing the core questions of 'What do you think you will die from, and how long do you expect to live?' Participants indicated their longevity estimation was guided by three key frameworks: family history, environment and lifestyle factors and lived experience...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521649/-am-i-really-gonna-go-sixty-years-without-getting-cancer-again-uncertainty-and-liminality-in-young-women-s-accounts-of-living-with-a-history-of-breast-cancer
#6
Sophie Rees
Although much research has examined the experience of breast cancer, the distinctive perspectives and lives of young women have been relatively neglected. Women diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 45, and who had completed their initial treatment, were interviewed, and social constructionist grounded theory methods were used to analyse the data. The end of initial treatment was accompanied by a sense of unease and uncertainty in relation to recurrence and survival, and also fertility and menopausal status...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521648/an-exploratory-study-of-the-experience-of-fibromyalgia-diagnosis-in-south-africa
#7
Silvie Cooper, Leah Gilbert
Within the conceptual framework of 'medically-ill-defined' conditions, this article focuses on the experiences of 'diagnosis' through a narrative analysis of fibromyalgia (a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder) in South Africa. In-depth interviews were used to collect narratives from 15 participants. The findings show how the contested and confusing experience of fibromyalgia diagnosis can be understood, by viewing the interactions that patients have with their practitioners, families, peers and colleagues...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521647/a-qualitative-investigation-of-lay-perspectives-of-diagnosis-and-self-management-strategies-employed-by-people-with-progressive-multiple-sclerosis
#8
Julia Frost, Jane Grose, Nicky Britten
This article explores how people with progressive multiple sclerosis give meaning to their experiences. It builds upon the self-management literature, which has captured the tension between the desire for retaining normalcy and the increasing burden of self-management associated with chronic disease progression. This repeat interview study is empirically grounded in 28 interviews with 14 people with progressive multiple sclerosis. We identified gender differences in diagnosis-seeking which impacted subsequent sense-making...
May 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26655326/when-choice-becomes-limited-women-s-experiences-of-delay-in-labour
#9
Natalie Armstrong, Sara Kenyon
Choice and patient involvement in decision-making are strong aspirations of contemporary healthcare. One of the most striking areas in which this is played out is maternity care where recent policy has focused on choice and supporting normal birth. However, birth is sometimes not straightforward and unanticipated complications can rapidly reduce choice. We draw on the accounts of women who experienced delay during labour with their first child. This occurs when progress is slow, and syntocinon is administered to strengthen and regulate contractions...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26487687/the-consent-process-enabling-or-disabling-patients-active-participation
#10
Carole Doherty, Charitini Stavropoulou, Mark Nk Saunders, Tracey Brown
Standards expected by doctors' regulatory bodies in respect of the process of consent to treatment have arguably sought to restructure the nature of the doctor-patient relationship from one of the paternalism to that of shared decision-making. Yet, few studies have explored empirically, from patients' perspectives, the extent to which the process of consent to treatment enables or disables patients' participation in medical decision-making. Our article examines patients' attitudes towards the consent process, exploring how and why these attitudes influence patients' active participation in decision-making and considering possible consequent medico-legal issues...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26216897/online-self-expression-and-experimentation-as-reflectivism-using-text-analytics-to-examine-the-participatory-forum-hello-sunday-morning
#11
Nicholas Carah, Carla Meurk, Daniel Angus
Hello Sunday Morning is an online health promotion organisation that began in 2009. Hello Sunday Morning asks participants to stop consuming alcohol for a period of time, set a goal and document their progress on a personal blog. Hello Sunday Morning is a unique health intervention for three interrelated reasons: (1) it was generated outside a clinical setting, (2) it uses new media technologies to create structured forms of participation in an iterative and open-ended way and (3) participants generate a written record of their progress along with demographic, behavioural and engagement data...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26216896/personal-health-technologies-micropolitics-and-resistance-a-new-materialist-analysis
#12
Nick J Fox
Personal health technologies are near-body devices or applications designed for use by a single individual, principally outside healthcare facilities. They enable users to monitor physiological processes or body activity, are frequently communication-enabled and sometimes also intervene therapeutically. This article explores a range of personal health technologies, from blood pressure or blood glucose monitors purchased in pharmacies and fitness monitors such as Fitbit and Nike+ Fuelband to drug pumps and implantable medical devices...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26216895/strong-female-and-black-stereotypes-of-african-caribbean-women-s-body-shape-and-their-effects-on-clinical-encounters
#13
Nicole Andrews, Sheila Greenfield, Will Drever, Sabi Redwood
The aim of this article is to explore how tendencies to stereotype minority ethnic groups intersect with lay discourses about them in ways that can reproduce cultural prejudices and reinforce inequalities in access to services and health outcomes. Drawing upon Black feminist and cultural studies literature, we present a theoretical examination, the stereotypes of the Black woman as 'mammy' and 'matriarch'. We suggest that the influence of these two images is central to understanding the normalisation of the larger Black female body within African Caribbean communities...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26208697/resignifying-the-sickle-cell-gene-narratives-of-genetic-risk-impairment-and-repair
#14
Maria Berghs, Simon M Dyson, Karl Atkin
Connecting theoretical discussion with empirical qualitative work, this article examines how sickle cell became a site of public health intervention in terms of 'racialised' risks. Historically, sickle cell became socio-politically allied to ideas of repair, in terms of the state improving the health of a neglected ethnic minority population. Yet, we elucidate how partial improvements in care and education arose alongside preventative public health screening efforts. Using qualitative research based in the United Kingdom, we show how a focus on collective efforts of repair can lie in tension with how services and individuals understand and negotiate antenatal screening...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26150314/public-health-promotion-of-local-food-constituting-the-self-governing-citizen-consumer
#15
Colleen Derkatch, Philippa Spoel
This article explores how the recent and growing promotion of local foods by public health units in Ontario, Canada, rhetorically interpellates the "good" health citizen as someone who not only takes responsibility for personal health but, through the consumption and support of "local food," also accepts and fulfills her responsibilities to care for the local economy, the community's well-being, and the natural environment. Drawing on Charland's concept of constitutive rhetoric, we analyze a selection of public health unit documents about local food to develop a textured account of the complex, multifaceted forms of health citizenship they constitute...
March 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401817/contesting-facts-about-wind-farms-in-australia-and-the-legitimacy-of-adverse-health-effects
#16
Shannon Clark, Linda Courtenay Botterill
The development of wind energy in Australia has been subject to ongoing public debate and has been characterised by concerns over the health impacts of wind turbines. Using discursive psychology, we examine 'wind turbine syndrome' as a contested illness and analyse how people build and undermine divergent arguments about wind-farm health effects. This article explores two facets of the dispute. First, we consider how participants construct 'facts' about the health effects of wind farms. We examine rhetorical resources used to construct wind farms as harmful or benign...
February 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401816/clinical-encounter-and-the-logic-of-relationality-reconfiguring-bodies-and-subjectivities-in-clinical-relations
#17
Karolina A Kazimierczak
This article critically examines the significance of relational approaches for sociological understandings of clinical interactions, relations and practices, by exploring the ways in which relational theories and concepts have been employed in the recent sociological accounts of clinical encounters to trouble the classical dyadic models of clinical interaction and the related atomistic conceptions of agency and accountability. Reading this work through the theoretical contributions from feminist science studies scholarship, and particularly the work of Donna Haraway and Karen Barad, the article proposes an alternative understanding of clinical interactions, relations and practices, where relations are conceived as constitutive of individuals (objects/bodies and their attributes/identities), rather than being constituted by encounters between individuals...
January 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401815/to-be-or-not-to-be-sick-and-tired-managing-the-visibility-of-hiv-and-hiv-related-fatigue
#18
Laura Schuft, Estelle Duval, Julie Thomas, Sylvain Ferez
This article takes a new direction in exploring HIV-related fatigue by adopting a qualitative interactionist approach. We analyse the social meanings attributed to fatigue among people living with HIV in France, the social gains and losses of its visibility and the social frames that condition its discursive and physical expression. The two-part methodology combines grounded theory analysis of 50 transcribed unstructured interviews conducted across France and participant observations within four HIV-related associations...
January 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401814/public-discourse-on-mental-health-and-psychiatry-representations-in-swedish-newspapers
#19
Robert Ohlsson
Mass media plays a central role in shaping public discourse on health and illness. In order to examine media representations of mental health and expert knowledge in this field, two major Swedish daily newspapers from the year 2009 were qualitatively analysed. Drawing on the theory of social representations, the analysis focused on how issues concerning mental health and different perspectives are represented. The results show how the concept of mental illness is used in different and often taken-for-granted ways and how the distinction between normal and pathological is a central underlying question...
January 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401813/epistemological-challenges-in-contemporary-western-healthcare-systems-exemplified-by-people-s-widespread-use-of-complementary-and-alternative-medicine
#20
Anita Salamonsen, Rolf Ahlzén
Modern Western public healthcare systems offer predominantly publicly subsidized healthcare traditionally based on biomedicine as the most important basis to cure persons who suffer from disorders of somatic or psychiatric nature. To which extent this epistemological position is suitable for this purpose is under scientific debate and challenged by some people's personal understandings of health and illness, their individual illness experiences and their decision-making. Current studies show decreasing levels of patient trust in Western public healthcare and a widespread patient-initiated use of complementary and alternative medicine which is often linked to unmet patient-defined healthcare needs...
January 1, 2017: Health (London)
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