journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Clinics in Liver Disease

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605077/acute-liver-failure
#1
EDITORIAL
Nikolaos T Pyrsopoulos
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605076/future-approaches-and-therapeutic-modalities-for-acute-liver-failure
#2
REVIEW
Pavan Patel, Nneoma Okoronkwo, Nikolaos T Pyrsopoulos
The current gold standard for the management of acute liver failure is liver transplantation. However, because of organ shortages, other modalities of therapy are necessary as a possible bridge. This article discusses the current modalities as well as the future management of acute liver failure. Liver assist devices, hepatocyte transplantation, stem cell transplant, organogenesis, and repopulation of decellularized organs are discussed.
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605075/liver-transplantation-for-acute-liver-failure
#3
REVIEW
Raquel Olivo, James V Guarrera, Nikolaos T Pyrsopoulos
With the advent of liver transplant for acute liver failure (ALF), survival rate has improved drastically. Liver transplant for ALF accounts for 8% of all transplant cases. The 1-year survival rates are 79% in Europe and 84% in the United States. Some patients with ALF may recover spontaneously, and approximately half will undergo liver transplant. It is imperative to identify patients with ALF as soon as possible to transfer them to a liver transplant center for a thorough evaluation. Emergent liver transplant in a patient with ALF may place the patient at risk for severe complications in the postoperative period...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605074/management-of-acute-liver-failure-in-the-intensive-care-unit-setting
#4
REVIEW
Priyanka Rajaram, Ram Subramanian
This article discusses the intensive care unit management of patients with acute liver failure. It focuses on the clinical presentation, identification, and management of the myriad of complications seen in patients with acute liver failure.
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605073/non-intensive-care-unit-management-of-acute-liver-failure
#5
REVIEW
Andres F Carrion, Paul Martin
Acute liver failure (ALF) is an uncommon syndrome with a highly variable and unpredictable clinical course. The initial diagnostic evaluation is typically performed in a non-intensive care unit (ICU) setting, like the emergency department or general hospital ward. Prompt restoration of intravascular volume with intravenous fluids and correction of electrolyte, metabolic, and acid-base disturbances are important initial interventions in the management of ALF and can be safely accomplished in non-ICU settings in many patients...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605072/prognostic-models-in-acute-liver-failure
#6
REVIEW
Avantika Mishra, Vinod Rustgi
There is a strong imperative to develop valid and accurate prognostic modeling for acute liver failure (ALF). Despite the numerous clinical models that have been proposed thus far and the use of some such models, that is, King's College Criteria and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease, in clinical practice to aid decision-making, there is a significant need for improvement for determining patients' clinical course, survival, and requirement for liver transplantation. Future prognostic models shall need a stronger statistical foundation and accountability for time and variability in the clinical course of ALF and be applied for pretransplant and posttransplant outcomes...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605071/the-clinical-spectrum-and-manifestations-of-acute-liver-failure
#7
REVIEW
Sarah Zahra Maher, Ian Roy Schreibman
Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare life-threatening condition characterized by rapid progression and death. Causes vary according to geographic region, with acetaminophen and drug-induced ALF being the most common causes in the United States. Determining the cause aids in predicting the prognosis and the presentation of manifestations and guides providers to perform cause-specific management. At initial presentation, nonspecific symptoms are present but may progress to complications, including cerebral edema, infection, coagulopathy, renal failure, cardiopulmonary failure, and acid-base and/or metabolic disturbances...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605070/nonviral-or-drug-induced-etiologies-of-acute-liver-failure
#8
REVIEW
Russell Rosenblatt, Robert S Brown
Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare but highly fatal condition. The most common causes include drug-induced and viral hepatitis, but other less common etiologies, especially autoimmune hepatitis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, and Wilson disease, need to be considered. Because diagnosis is frequently tied to potential for reversibility of ALF and prognosis, early identification in a timely manner is crucial. Other causes of ALF are more easily recognizable based on specific circumstances, such as ALF in pregnancy or ischemic hepatitis...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605069/acetaminophen-apap-or-n-acetyl-p-aminophenol-and-acute-liver-failure
#9
REVIEW
Chalermrat Bunchorntavakul, K Rajender Reddy
Acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF), although the worldwide frequency is variable. APAP hepatotoxicity develops either following intentional overdose or unintentional ingestion (therapeutic misadventure) in the background of several factors, such as concomitant use of alcohol and certain medications that facilitate the formation of reactive and toxic metabolites. Spontaneous survival is more common in APAP-induced ALF compared with non-APAP etiologies. N-acetylcysteine is recommended for all patients with APAP-induced ALF and it reduces mortality...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605068/nonacetaminophen-drug-induced-acute-liver-failure
#10
REVIEW
Arul M Thomas, James H Lewis
Acute liver failure of all causes is diagnosed in between 2000 and 2500 patients annually in the United States. Drug-induced acute liver failure is the leading cause of acute liver failure, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Nonacetaminophen drug injury represents 11% of all cases in the latest registry from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Although rare, acute liver failure is clinically dramatic when it occurs, and requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. In contrast with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure, non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure has a more ominous prognosis with a lower liver transplant-free survival...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605067/viral-hepatitis-and-acute-liver-failure-still-a-problem
#11
REVIEW
Daniel Sedhom, Melroy D'Souza, Elizabeth John, Vinod Rustgi
Although the overall prevalence is on the decline, viral hepatitis still plays a major role in the development of acute liver failure (ALF) worldwide. Hepatitis A, B, D, and E contribute to most fulminant viral courses. These viruses have not gained much attention in recent years yet remain relevant from a clinical perspective as the incidence in certain populations is on the increase. Other viral therapies and immunotherapies are currently being examined as treatments for hepatitis D and hepatitis E. Clinicians should still maintain a high index of suspicion for viral causes in approaching patients with ALF...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605066/liver-regeneration-in-the-acute-liver-failure-patient
#12
REVIEW
Keith M Wirth, Scott Kizy, Clifford J Steer
Liver regeneration after simple resection represents a unique process in which the organ returns to its original size and histologic structure. Over the past 30 years, there has been significant progress in elucidating the mechanisms associated with regeneration after loss of hepatic mass. Liver regeneration after acute liver failure shares several of these classical pathways. It differs, however, in key processes, including the role of both differentiated and stemlike cells. This article outlines these differences in addition to new molecular mechanisms, including immunomodulation, microRNAs, and the gut-liver axis...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605065/the-pathology-of-acute-liver-failure
#13
REVIEW
Billie Fyfe, Francisco Zaldana, Chen Liu
Varied injuries may manifest clinically as acute liver failure. The pathologic features include variable amounts of necrosis and regeneration. This article reviews pathologic classification of patterns of necrosis and associated inflammatory and regenerative responses in specimens from patients with acute liver failure. Detailed pathologic examination of these specimens with clinical pathologic correlation can give the multidisciplinary team vital information regarding etiology and timing as well as extent of injury, and regenerative response...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605064/acute-liver-failure-mechanisms-of-disease-and-multisystemic-involvement
#14
REVIEW
Steven Krawitz, Vivek Lingiah, Nikolaos T Pyrsopoulos
Acute liver failure is accompanied by a pathologic syndrome common to numerous different etiologies of liver injury. This acute liver failure syndrome leads to potentially widespread devastating end-organ consequences. Systemic dysregulation and dysfunction is likely propagated via inflammation as well as underlying hepatic failure itself. Decoding the mechanisms of the disease process and multisystemic involvement of acute liver failure offers potential for targeted treatment opportunities and improved clinical outcomes in this sick population...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29605063/classification-and-epidemiologic-aspects-of-acute-liver-failure
#15
REVIEW
Daniel Pievsky, Neil Rustgi, Nikolaos T Pyrsopoulos
Acute liver failure is a rare condition with high short-term morbidity and mortality. The most widely accepted definition is an abnormality in coagulation with any degree of encephalopathy in a patient without cirrhosis and an illness duration of less than 26 weeks. Multiple classifications systems are currently in use to help categorize the condition. This article reviews the most commonly used systems. The epidemiologic aspects of the disease are also reviewed, including incidence, prevalence, demographics, geographic distribution, and racial and cultural factors and are discussed for the various subtypes of acute liver failure...
May 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128064/nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-an-expanding-health-care-epidemic
#16
EDITORIAL
David E Bernstein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128063/radiologic-imaging-in-nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-and-nonalcoholic-steatohepatitis
#17
REVIEW
Yonah B Esterson, Gregory M Grimaldi
The article reviews the multimodality (ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance [MR]) imaging appearance of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and discusses the radiologic diagnostic criteria as well as the sensitivity and specificity of these imaging methods. The authors review the role of both ultrasound and MR elastography for the diagnosis of fibrosis and for the longitudinal evaluation of patients following therapeutic intervention. Lastly, the authors briefly discuss the screening and diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with NAFLD, as there are special considerations in this population...
February 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128062/diagnosis-and-evaluation-of-nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-nonalcoholic-steatohepatitis-including-noninvasive-biomarkers-and-transient-elastography
#18
REVIEW
Eugenia Tsai, Tai-Ping Lee
The incidence and prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are increasing and identification of people at risk of disease progression is extremely important. The current gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is by liver biopsy, but it has several limitations. Noninvasive tests via biomarkers and transient elastography to assess NAFLD/NASH are being used in clinical practice. The most validated diagnostic panels include the NAFLD fibrosis score, FIB-4 (Fibrosis-4), and FibroMeter...
February 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128061/the-genetics-of-pediatric-nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease
#19
REVIEW
Nidhi P Goyal, Jeffrey B Schwimmer
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children. Severe fibrosis and cirrhosis are potential consequences of pediatric NAFLD and can occur within a few years of diagnosis. Observations suggest that genetics may be a strong modifying factor in the presentation, severity, and natural history of the disease. There is increasing interest in determining at-risk populations based on genetics in the hope of finding genotypes that correlate to NAFLD phenotype. Ultimately, the hope is to be able to tailor therapeutics to genetic predispositions and decrease disease morbidity in children with NAFLD...
February 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29128060/risk-factors-for-the-development-of-nonalcoholic-fatty-liver-disease-nonalcoholic-steatohepatitis-including-genetics
#20
REVIEW
Huei-Wen Lim, David E Bernstein
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is emerging as the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. This trend is, in part, secondary, to the growing incidence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Other risk factors include age, gender, race/ethnicity, genetic predisposition, and polycystic ovarian disease. With the introduction of genome-wide association studies, genetic mutations contributing to inherited susceptibility to steatosis have been identified, which hold keys to future improvement in diagnosis and management...
February 2018: Clinics in Liver Disease
journal
journal
32798
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"