Read by QxMD icon Read

Prehospital Emergency Care

Colin B Page, Lachlan E Parker, Stephen J Rashford, Emma Bosley, Katherine Z Isoardi, Frances E Williamson, Geoffrey K Isbister
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Acute behavioral disturbance is a common problem for emergency medical services. We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of droperidol compared to midazolam in the prehospital setting. METHODS: This was a prospective before and after study comparing droperidol to midazolam for prehospital acute behavioral disturbance, when the state ambulance service changed medications. The primary outcome was the proportion of adverse effects (airway intervention, oxygen saturation < 90%, respiratory rate < 12, systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, sedation assessment tool score -3 and dystonic reactions) in patients receiving sedation...
March 20, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Jane H Brice, Matthew A Psioda, Renee Johnson, Amy Oakley, Julianne M Cyr, Christopher S Cowden, Richard Uribe
BACKGROUND: Accessing the emergency medical services system via 9-1-1 operators is an effective way for patients to seek urgent health care; however, technological advances and telecommunication practices inundate the 9-1-1 and emergency services infrastructure with unintentional calls that delay response efforts to legitimate medical emergencies. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the change in university-wide dial-out prefix from "9" to "7" reduced unnecessary calls to a 9-1-1 call center...
March 9, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Steven G Schauer, Michael D April, Guyon J Hill, Jason F Naylor, Matthew A Borgman, Robert A De Lorenzo
BACKGROUND: United States (US) and coalition military medical units deployed to combat zones frequently encounter pediatric trauma patients. Pediatric patients may present unique challenges due to their anatomical and physiological characteristics and most military prehospital providers lack pediatric-specific training. A minimal amount of data exists to illuminate the prehospital care of pediatric patients in this environment. We describe the prehospital care of pediatric trauma patients in Iraq and Afghanistan...
March 1, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Jessica E Salerno, Leonard S Weiss, David D Salcido
INTRODUCTION: Opioid-related overdoses have been steadily increasing over the past decade in the United States. Naloxone is used by first responders to revive overdose victims, but results may be improved by increasing access to and usage of naloxone by bystanders. Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are pervasive, recognizable, and publicly accessible. Co-locating naloxone kits with AEDs could increase public naloxone access and usage. However, the impact of co-locating naloxone kits with AEDs is not known...
March 1, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Craig D Newgard, Rochelle Fu, Susan Malveau, Tom Rea, Denise E Griffiths, Eileen Bulger, Pat Klotz, Abbie Tirrell, Dana Zive
Conducting out-of-hospital research is unique and challenging and requires tracking patients across multiple phases of care, using multiple sources of patient records and multiple hospitals. The logistics and strategies used for out-of-hospital research are distinct from other forms of clinical research. The increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs) by hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) agencies presents a large opportunity for accelerating out-of-hospital research, as well as particular challenges...
March 1, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Layne Dylla, Nicole M Acquisto, Francis Manzo, Jeremy T Cushman
Dexamethasone is frequently used in the treatment of allergic reactions and airway inflammation because of its potent anti-inflammatory effects and long duration of action. As prehospital use becomes more common, it is important for providers to be aware of unique and potentially distressing associated adverse effects. We report eight cases of intravenous dexamethasone administration associated with perineal or diffuse burning sensation in female patients.
February 27, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Jeremiah M Kinsman, Kathy Robinson
OBJECTIVE: Previous research conducted in November 2013 found there were a limited number of states and territories in the United States (US) that authorize emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and emergency medical responders (EMRs) to administer opioid antagonists. Given the continued increase in the number of opioid-related overdoses and deaths, many states have changed their policies to authorize EMTs and EMRs to administer opioid antagonists. The goal of this study is to provide an updated description of policy on EMS licensure levels' authority to administer opioid antagonists for all 50 US states, the District of Columbia (DC), and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (PR)...
February 27, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Rein Ketelaars, Christian Beekers, Geert-Jan Van Geffen, Gert Jan Scheffer, Nico Hoogerwerf
BACKGROUND: Patients in cardiac arrest must receive algorithm-based management such as basic life support and advanced (cardiac) life support. International guidelines dictate diagnosing and treating any factor that may have caused the arrest or may be complicating the resuscitation. Ultrasound may be of potential value in this process and can be used in a prehospital setting. The objective is to evaluate the use of prehospital ultrasound during traumatic and non-traumatic CPR and determine its impact on prehospital treatment decisions in a Dutch helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS)...
February 22, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Carly Loner, Nicole M Acquisto, Heather Lenhardt, Benjamin Sensenbach, Julie Purick, Courtney M C Jones, Jeremy T Cushman
OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy of multiple Intravenous Infusion Flow Regulators (IIFRs) at infusion rates and hanging heights common to the prehospital setting. METHODS: Five different manufacturer's IIFRs were tested over a range of infusion rates while hanging at heights equivalent to the gurney pole, ambulance ceiling hook, and manufacturer's recommended height (if available). Each IIFR was run over a 15-minute period at each infusion rate and height three times...
February 21, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
David J Olvera, David F E Stuhlmiller, Allen Wolfe, Charles F Swearingen, Troy Pennington, Daniel P Davis
INTRODUCTION: Airway management is a critical skill for air medical providers, including the use of rapid sequence intubation (RSI) medications. Mediocre success rates and a high incidence of complications has challenged air medical providers to improve training and performance improvement efforts to improve clinical performance. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this research was to describe the experience with a novel, integrated advanced airway management program across a large air medical company and explore the impact of the program on improvement in RSI success...
February 21, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Ryan J Reichert, Megan Gothard, M David Gothard, Hamilton P Schwartz, Michael T Bigham
INTRODUCTION: Tracheal intubation (TI) is a lifesaving critical care skill. Failed TI attempts, however, can harm patients. Critical care transport (CCT) teams function as the first point of critical care contact for patients being transported to tertiary medical centers for specialized surgical, medical, and trauma care. The Ground and Air Medical qUality in Transport (GAMUT) Quality Improvement Collaborative uses a quality metric database to track CCT quality metric performance, including TI...
February 21, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Erik E Swartz, W Steven Tucker, Matthew Nowak, Jason Roberto, Amy Hollingworth, Laura C Decoster, Thomas W Trimarco, Jason P Mihalik
OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of two different spinal immobilization techniques on cervical spine movement in a simulated prehospital ground transport setting. METHODS: A counterbalanced crossover design was used to evaluate two different spinal immobilization techniques in a standardized environment. Twenty healthy male volunteers (age = 20.9 ± 2.2 yr) underwent ambulance transport from a simulated scene to a simulated emergency department setting in two separate conditions: utilizing traditional spinal immobilization (TSI) and spinal motion restriction (SMR)...
February 16, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Brian M Clemency, Christopher T Tanski, Jennifer Gibson Chambers, Michael O'Brien, Andrew S Knapp, Alexander J Clark, Patrick McGoff, Johanna Innes, Heather A Lindstrom, David Hostler
BACKGROUND: Backboards have been shown to cause pain in uninjured patients. This may alter physical exam findings, leading emergency department (ED) providers to suspect a spinal injury when none exists resulting in additional imaging of the thoracolumbar spine. New York had previously employed a "Spinal Immobilization" protocol that included compulsory backboard application for all patients with suspected spinal injuries. In 2015, New York instituted a new "Spinal Motion Restriction" protocol that made backboard use optional for these patients...
February 15, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Steven G Schauer, Michael D April, Jason F Naylor, Joseph K Maddry, Allyson A Arana, Michael A Dubick, Andrew D Fisher, Cord W Cunningham, Anthony E Pusateri
INTRODUCTION: Hemorrhage is the leading cause of death on the battlefield. Development of chitosan- and kaolin-based hemostatic agents has improved hemorrhage control options. Sparse data exists on the use of these agents in the prehospital, combat setting. We describe recent use of these agents and compare patients receiving hemostatic to the baseline population. METHODS: We used a series of emergency department (ED) procedure codes to identify patients within the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DODTR) from January 2007 to August 2016...
February 12, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Hunter Singh Lau, Matthew M Hollander, Jeremy T Cushman, Eva H DuGoff, Courtney M C Jones, Amy J H Kind, Michael T Lohmeier, Eric A Coleman, Manish N Shah
OBJECTIVE: The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI) has potential to improve the emergency department (ED)-to-home transition for older adults. Community paramedics may function as the CTI coaches; however, this requires the appropriate knowledge, skills, and attitudes, which they do not receive in traditional emergency medical services (EMS) education. This study aimed to define community paramedics' perceptions regarding their training needs to serve as CTI coaches supporting the ED-to-home transition...
February 12, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Kevin Ryan, Douglas George, James Liu, Patricia Mitchell, Kerrie Nelson, Ricky Kue
BACKGROUND: Mass casualty incident (MCI) triage and the use of triage tags to assign treatment priorities are not fully implemented despite emergency medical services (EMS) personnel training during drills and exercises. OBJECTIVES: To compare current field triage practices during both training and actual MCIs and identify any potential barriers to use. METHODS: During training sessions from November 2015 through March 2016, an anonymous survey was distributed to personnel in 3 distinct types of paid full-time EMS systems: Boston EMS (2-tiered, municipal third-service); Portland Fire Department (fire department-based ALS); and Stokes County EMS (county-based ALS) combined with Forsyth County EMS (county-based ALS)...
February 9, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Daniel Joseph, Jody A Vogel, C Sam Smith, Whitney Barrett, Gary Bryskiewicz, Aaron Eberhardt, David Edwards, Lara Rappaport, Christopher B Colwell, Kevin E McVaney
BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with a substantial number of emergency department visits annually and is responsible for a significant number of lives lost each year in the United States. However, a minimal amount is known about the impact of alcohol on the EMS system. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to determine the proportion of 9-1-1 calls in Denver, Colorado in which (1) alcohol was a contributing factor or (2) the individual receiving EMS services had recently ingested alcohol...
February 8, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Steven G Schauer, Allyson A Arana, Jason F Naylor, Guyon J Hill, Michael D April
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have evaluated prehospital analgesia during combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, but were limited to the adult population. However, a significant portion of the casualties of those conflicts were children. We describe the prehospital analgesia administered to wartime pediatric trauma patients. METHODS: We queried the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DODTR) for all pediatric patients (<18 years of age) admitted to United States and Coalition fixed-facility hospitals in Iraq and Afghanistan from January 2007 to January 2016...
February 7, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Jamie O Creed, Julianne M Cyr, Hillary Owino, Shannen E Box, Mia Ives-Rublee, Brian B Sheitman, Beat D Steiner, Jefferson G Williams, Michael W Bachman, Jose G Cabanas, J Brent Myers, Seth W Glickman
OBJECTIVE: Emergency Departments (ED) are overburdened with patients experiencing acute mental health crises. Pre-hospital transport by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to community mental health and substance abuse treatment facilities could reduce ED utilization and costs. Our objective was to describe characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of acute mental health crises patients who were transported by EMS to an acute crisis unit at WakeBrook, a North Carolina community mental health center...
February 7, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Jacinta Waack, Matthew Shepherd, Emily Andrew, Stephen Bernard, Karen Smith
OBJECTIVE: Delayed sequence intubation (DSI) involves the administration of ketamine to facilitate adequate preoxygenation in the agitated patient. DSI was introduced into the Clinical Practice Guideline for Intensive Care Flight Paramedics in Victoria in late 2013. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of patients receiving DSI. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients who received DSI between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2016, during both primary response and retrieval missions...
February 6, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"