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Journal of Neural Transmission

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647831/alterations-in-regional-homogeneity-of-resting-state-brain-activity-in-fatigue-of-parkinson-s-disease
#1
Junyi Li, Yongsheng Yuan, Min Wang, Jiejin Zhang, Li Zhang, Siming Jiang, Jian Ding, Kezhong Zhang
Fatigue is a common complaint in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the neural bases of fatigue in PD remain uncertain. In this cross-sectional study, our aim was to study the change of the local brain function in PD patients with fatigue. Among 49 patients with PD, 17 of them had fatigue and the remaining 32 patients without fatigue, and 25 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled. All subjects were evaluated with Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and had a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) scan...
June 24, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28643101/cognitive-performance-correlates-with-the-degree-of-dopaminergic-degeneration-in-the-associative-part-of-the-striatum-in-non-demented-parkinson-s-patients
#2
Dorothee Kübler, Henning Schroll, Ralph Buchert, Andrea A Kühn
Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show cognitive deficits that are relevant in terms of prognosis and quality of life. Degeneration of striatal dopaminergic afferents proceeds from dorsal/caudal to anterior/ventral and is discussed to account for some of these symptoms. Treatment with dopamine (DA) has differential effects on cognitive dysfunctions, improving some and worsening others. We hypothesized that cognitive performance during the dopaminergic OFF state correlates with DAT availability in the associative striatum...
June 22, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620835/twenty-years-since-the-discovery-of-the-parkin-gene
#3
REVIEW
Nobutaka Hattori, Yoshikuni Mizuno
Nearly 20 years have passed since we identified the causative gene for a familial Parkinson's disease, parkin (now known as PARK2), in 1998. PARK2 is the most common gene responsible for young-onset Parkinson's disease. It codes for the protein Parkin RBR E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (PARK2), which directly links to the ubiquitin-proteasome as a ubiquitin ligase. PARK2 is involved in mitophagy, which is a type of autophagy, in collaboration with PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). The PINK1 gene (previously known as PARK6) is also a causative gene for young-onset Parkinson's disease...
June 15, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620834/dysregulation-of-striatal-projection-neurons-in-parkinson-s-disease
#4
REVIEW
Goichi Beck, Arun Singh, Stella M Papa
The loss of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) is the primary cause of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the underlying striatal mechanisms remain unclear. In spite of abundant literature portraying structural, biochemical and plasticity changes of striatal projection neurons (SPNs), in the past there has been a data vacuum from the natural human disease and its close model in non-human primates. Recently, single-cell recordings in advanced parkinsonian primates have generated new insights into the altered function of SPNs...
June 15, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620833/assessment-of-serum-uric-acid-as-risk-factor-for-tauopathies
#5
Tommaso Schirinzi, Giulia Di Lazzaro, Vito Luigi Colona, Paola Imbriani, Mohammad Alwardat, Giulia Maria Sancesario, Alessandro Martorana, Antonio Pisani
Low levels of serum uric acid (UA) are a risk factor for many neurodegenerative diseases but the role of UA in tauopathies has not been yet fully evaluated. In this study, we assessed the risk associated with serum UA levels in a large group of patients with tauopathies, either primary or secondary. The mean serum UA concentrations of 111 patients with tauopathies (TAU), including 41 with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 45 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 25 with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) were compared to that of 130 controls (CTL)...
June 15, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601961/basal-ganglia-movement-disorders-and-deep-brain-stimulation-advances-made-through-non-human-primate-research
#6
REVIEW
Thomas Wichmann, Hagai Bergman, Mahlon R DeLong
Studies in non-human primates (NHPs) have led to major advances in our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia and of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of hypokinetic movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and hyperkinetic disorders such as chorea and dystonia. Since the brains of NHPs are anatomically very close to those of humans, disease states and the effects of medical and surgical approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), can be more faithfully modeled in NHPs than in other species...
June 10, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593500/bilateral-thalamic-deep-brain-stimulation-for-essential-tremor-in-elderly-patients
#7
Johann Klein, Lars Büntjen, Gerrit Jacobi, Imke Galazky, Patricia Panther, Tino Zaehle, Jörn Kaufmann, Hans-Jochen Heinze, Jürgen Voges, Andreas Kupsch
The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of age on thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) in essential tremor (ET). Tremor, cognition, mood and adverse events in patients with thalamic DBS for ET were evaluated in 26 consecutive patients with established standardized methods for tremor and cognition. Twelve patients <70 and 14 patients ≥70 years were included and followed for 2 years. Clinical outcomes did not differ significantly. DBS seems to be safe and effective for ET independent of age...
June 7, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28584926/theory-of-mind-performance-in-parkinson-s-disease-is-associated-with-motor-and-cognitive-functions-but-not-with-symptom-lateralization
#8
Lisa Nobis, Katharina Schindlbeck, Felicitas Ehlen, Hannes Tiedt, Charlotte Rewitzer, Annelien A Duits, Fabian Klostermann
Next to the typical motor signs, Parkinson's disease (PD) goes along with neuropsychiatric symptoms, amongst others affecting social cognition. Particularly, Theory of Mind (ToM) impairments have mostly been associated with right hemispherical brain dysfunction, so that it might prevail in patients with left dominant PD. Fourty-four PD patients, twenty-four with left and twenty with right dominant motor symptoms, engaged in the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME) and the Faux Pas Detection Test (FPD) to assess affective and cognitive ToM...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577058/type-b-and-a-monoamine-oxidase-and-their-inhibitors-regulate-the-gene-expression-of-bcl-2-and-neurotrophic-factors-in-human-glioblastoma-u118mg-cells-different-signal-pathways-for-neuroprotection-by-selegiline-and-rasagiline
#9
Keiko Inaba-Hasegawa, Masayo Shamoto-Nagai, Wakako Maruyama, Makoto Naoi
Type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B) in glial cells has been considered to be associated with neuronal death in Parkinson's disease. MAO-B inhibitors, rasagiline and selegiline [(-)deprenyl], protect neurons in animal and cellular models of neurodegeneration. However, the role of MAO-B itself in the regulation of cell death processing remains elusive, whereas type A MAO (MAO-A) mediates the induction of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 genes by rasagiline and selegiline. In this paper, the involvement of MAOs in the induction of neuroprotective genes by MAO inhibitors was investigated in human glioblastoma U118MG cells expressing mainly MAO-B...
June 2, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28550509/possible-involvement-of-acss2-gene-in-alcoholism
#10
Andrea Frozino Ribeiro, Roseli Boerngen de Lacerda, Diego Correia, Ana Lúcia Brunialti-Godard, Débora Marques de Miranda, Valdir Ribeiro Campos, Valéria Fernandes de Souza, Angela Maria Ribeiro
Alcoholism is a psychiatric disorder that composes one of the principal causes of health disabilities in the world population. Furthermore, the available pharmacotherapy is limited. Therefore, this research was carried out to better understand the basis of the underlying neurobiological processes of this disorder and to discover potential therapeutic targets. Real-time PCR analysis was performed in the amygdala nuclei region of the brain of mice exposed to a chronic three-bottle free-choice model (water, 5 and 10% v/v ethanol)...
May 26, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540422/loss-and-remodeling-of-striatal-dendritic-spines-in-parkinson-s-disease-from-homeostasis-to-maladaptive-plasticity
#11
REVIEW
Rosa M Villalba, Yoland Smith
In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and animal models of PD, the progressive degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) projection leads to two major changes in the morphology of striatal projection neurons (SPNs), i.e., a profound loss of dendritic spines and the remodeling of axospinous glutamatergic synapses. Striatal spine loss is an early event tightly associated with the extent of striatal DA denervation, but not the severity of parkinsonian motor symptoms, suggesting that striatal spine pruning might be a form of homeostatic plasticity that compensates for the loss of striatal DA innervation and the resulting dysregulation of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28534174/the-il-1%C3%AE-phenomena-in-neuroinflammatory-diseases
#12
REVIEW
Andrew S Mendiola, Astrid E Cardona
It is becoming increasingly clear that neuroinflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS)-related diseases, and therefore therapeutic strategies targeting the regulation or availability of inflammatory mediators can be used to prevent or mitigate pathology. Interestingly, the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), has been implicated in perpetuating immune responses and contributing to disease severity in a variety of CNS diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, and diabetic retinopathy...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28516241/innate-immunity-in-alzheimer-s-disease-the-relevance-of-animal-models
#13
REVIEW
Diana K Franco Bocanegra, James A R Nicoll, Delphine Boche
The mouse is one of the organisms most widely used as an animal model in biomedical research, due to the particular ease with which it can be handled and reproduced in laboratory. As a member of the mammalian class, mice share with humans many features regarding metabolic pathways, cell morphology and anatomy. However, important biological differences between mice and humans exist and must be taken into consideration when interpreting research results, to properly translate evidence from experimental studies into information that can be useful for human disease prevention and/or treatment...
May 17, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28516240/in-vivo-pet-imaging-of-neuroinflammation-in-alzheimer-s-disease
#14
REVIEW
Julien Lagarde, Marie Sarazin, Michel Bottlaender
Increasing evidence suggests that neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular imaging by PET may be a useful tool to assess neuroinflammation in vivo, thus helping to decipher the complex role of inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and providing a potential means of monitoring the effect of new therapeutic approaches. For this objective, the main target of PET studies is the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), as it is overexpressed by activated microglia...
May 17, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509077/relationships-between-cognitive-impairment-on-adas-cog-and-regional-cerebral-blood-flow-using-spect-in-late-onset-alzheimer-s-disease
#15
Michio Takahashi, Yasunori Oda, Toshiyuki Okubo, Yukihiko Shirayama
The aim of this study was to examine brain hypoperfusion and its relationship with cognitive dysfunction in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Forty patients with late-onset AD and not receiving acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were recruited from outpatient clinics. We examined cognitive function using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) and brain perfusion using single-photon emission computed tomography, and analyzed classified gyrus level segments with three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection and the stereotactic extraction estimation method level 3...
May 16, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28477285/a-molecular-pathway-analysis-stresses-the-role-of-inflammation-and-oxidative-stress-towards-cognition-in-schizophrenia
#16
Ellen Kure Fischer, Antonio Drago
Cognitive processes have a genetic component and are impaired in Schizophrenia (SKZ). The exact nature of such impairment escapes definition. The aim of the present contribution was the identification of the molecular pathways enriched with mutations (SNPs) associated with cognitive performance during antipsychotic treatment. 765 individuals from the CATIE study, males = 559, mean age 40.93 ± 11.03 were included. Working memory and the verbal memory were the evaluated outcomes. A mixed regression model for repeated measures served in R for clinical and molecular pathway analysis...
May 5, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466380/differences-of-temporal-dynamics-and-signal-complexity-of-gamma-band-oscillations-in-first-episode-psychosis-during-a-working-memory-task
#17
Pascal Missonnier, Logos Curtis, Joseph Ventura, François R Herrmann, Marco C G Merlo
Gamma band oscillations participate in the temporal binding needed to synchronize cortical networks, involved in early sensory and short term memory processes. In earlier studies, alterations of these neurophysiological parameters have been found in psychotic disorders. To date no study has explored the temporal dynamics and signal complexity of gamma band oscillations in first episode psychosis (FEP). To address this issue, gamma band analysis was performed in 15 FEP patients and 18 healthy controls who successfully performed an adapted 2-back working memory task...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451942/the-measuring-of-substantia-nigra-hyperechogenicity-in-an-italian-cohort-of-parkinson-disease-patients-a-case-control-study-nobis-study
#18
Patrizio Prati, A Bignamini, L Coppo, A Naldi, C Comi, R Cantello, G Gusmaroli, U Walter
Transcranial sonography (TCS) shows an increased echogenic area of the substantia nigra (SN) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). It has been increasingly used in the diagnosis of PD and its differentiation from atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Here, we studied the diagnostic accuracy of SN TCS in Italian patients. In this blinded cross-sectional study (NOBIS study), two expert neuro-sonologists performed TCS in 25 PD patients and 29 age- and sex-matched controls. The study participants were completely hidden to the TCS investigators using large drapery...
April 27, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444457/social-cognition-and-idiopathic-isolated-cervical-dystonia
#19
Kristína Czekóová, Petra Zemánková, Daniel J Shaw, Martin Bareš
For a long time, cervical dystonia (CD) has been characterised only by disturbances in motor functioning. Despite accumulating evidence for symptomatology in various non-motor domains, to date no study has investigated social cognition in CD. The aim of this study was to compare performance of CD patients and healthy controls in neurocognitive and socio-cognitive domain. Twenty-five non-depressed patients with CD and 26 healthy controls underwent neuropsychological testing. This involved assessment of cognitive status (general intellect, verbal memory, and executive function), and socio-cognitive functions using a Theory of mind task and self-report on empathy and emotion regulation...
April 25, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434076/%C3%AE-synuclein-nonhuman-primate-models-of-parkinson-s-disease
#20
REVIEW
David J Marmion, Jeffrey H Kordower
Proper understanding of the mechanism(s) by which α-synuclein misfolds and propagates may hold the key to unraveling the complex pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. A more complete understanding of the disease itself, as well as establishing animal models that fully recapitulate pathological and functional disease progression, are needed to develop treatments that will delay, halt or reverse the disease course. Traditional neurotoxin-based animal models fail to mimic crucial aspects of Parkinson's and thus are not relevant for the study of neuroprotection and disease-modifying therapies...
April 22, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
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