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Journal of Neural Transmission

Ewa Papuć, Konrad Rejdak
There is emerging evidence that glial cells are involved in the neuropathological process in Parkinson's disease (PD) in addition to degeneration of neuronal structures. Recently, we confirmed the presence of an adaptive immune response against different glial-derived antigens in PD, with a possible role of anti-MAG, anti-MBP and anti-PLP antibodies in the disease progression. The aim of the present study was to assess humoral response against myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) in patients with parkinsonism (both idiopathic and atypical) to check whether these antibodies could serve as biomarkers of PD, its severity and progression...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Wing Ting To, Jan Ost, John Hart, Dirk De Ridder, Sven Vanneste
Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of a corresponding external sound source. Research has suggested that functional abnormalities in tinnitus patients involve auditory as well as non-auditory brain areas. Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) to the auditory cortex, has demonstrated modulation of brain activity to transiently suppress tinnitus symptoms...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Dirk Dressler, Fereshte Adib Saberi
The therapeutic efficacy of botulinum toxin (BT) can be completely blocked by formation of BT antibodies (BTAB), thus producing antibody-induced therapy failure (ABTF). One of the risk factors for this is the interval between two subsequent injection series. To prevent BTAB formation it is universally recommended not to use interinjection intervals of less than 12 weeks. However, BT's therapeutic efficacy may be considerably shorter than this interval, thus causing substantial reduction of quality of life...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Valerie Van Cauwenberge, Edmund J S Sonuga-Barke, Karel Hoppenbrouwers, Karla Van Leeuwen, Jan R Wiersema
Studies have demonstrated inefficient use of antecedent-focused emotion regulation strategies in children with ADHD attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In the current study we tested for the first time if ADHD is also associated with difficulties in response-focused strategies by measuring the ability to override action tendencies induced by emotional information. Performance data on a computer-based approach-avoidance paradigm of 28 children with ADHD and 38 typically developing children between 8 and 15 years of age were analyzed, by comparing a congruent condition in which they were instructed to approach positive and avoid negative pictures and an incongruent condition where they had to override these automatic reactions and approach negative and avoid positive pictures...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Orsolya Györfi, Helga Nagy, Magdolna Bokor, Oguz Kelemen, Szabolcs Kéri
Despite the well-known neuropsychiatric side effects of dopaminergic medications, the possible subjective psychotomimetic effects of a single dose of L-DOPA in newly diagnosed, drug-naïve patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not known. To investigate this question, we used a visual search task for latent inhibition (LI), the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) scale, and visual analog scales for psychotomimetic effects (perception, relaxation, and dysphoria) in 28 de novo PD patients before (off) and after (on) the adminstration of L-DOPA and in 25 matched healthy control individuals...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Elizabeth Scarr, Catriona McLean, Brian Dean
It has been suggest that drugs specifically targeting muscarinic receptors will be useful in treating Alzheimer's disease. We decided to determine if the response to such drugs may be altered, because of changes in the levels of muscarinic receptors in the CNS from subjects with the disorder. We used in situ radioligand binding with autoradiography to measure the levels of [(3)H]pirenzepine binding to muscarinic M1 receptors, [(3)H]AF-DX 386 binding to muscarinic M1, M2, and M4 receptors, and [(3)H]4-DAMP binding to muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus from subjects with Alzheimer's and age/sex-matched controls...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Majid Motaghinejad, Manijeh Motevalian, Behnaz Shabab, Sulail Fatima
Methylphenidate (MPH) is a stimulatory agent in brain with unknown long-term consequences. In this study, MPH-induced neurodegeneration in adult rat brain was assessed. Rats were acutely treated with different doses of MPH. Open Field Test was used to investigate anxiety and depression levels. Inflammatory factors and anti-oxidant activity were also evaluated in isolated hippocampus and cerebral cortex. MPH treated groups (10 and 20 mg/kg) demonstrated anxiety and depression like behavior in OFT. MPH significantly increased lipid peroxidation, GSSG level, IL-1β and TNF-α in isolated tissues...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Maria Teresa Pellecchia, Riccardo Savastano, Marcello Moccia, Marina Picillo, Pietro Siano, Roberto Erro, Annamaria Vallelunga, Marianna Amboni, Carmine Vitale, Gabriella Santangelo, Paolo Barone
Cognitive deficits are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and many patients eventually develop dementia; however, its occurrence is unpredictable. Serum uric acid (UA) has been proposed as a biomarker of PD, both in the preclinical and clinical phase of the disease. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate relationships between baseline serum UA levels and occurrence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at 4-year follow-up in a cohort of early PD patients. Early PD patients, not presenting concomitant diseases, cognitive impairment or treatment possibly interfering with UA levels, underwent neuropsychological testing at baseline and 4-year follow-up...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Olga A Lyubashina, Sergey S Panteleev, Alexey Y Sokolov
Electrical stimulation of the greater occipital nerve (GON) has recently shown promise as an effective non-pharmacological prophylactic therapy for drug-resistant chronic primary headaches, but the neurobiological mechanisms underlying its anticephalgic action are not elucidated. Considering that the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) is a key segmental structure playing a prominent role in pathophysiology of headaches, in the present study we evaluated the effects of GON electrical stimulation on ongoing and evoked firing of the dura-sensitive STN neurons...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Majid Motaghinejad, Manijeh Motevalian, Reza Falak, Mansour Heidari, Mahshid Sharzad, Elham Kalantari
Methylphenidate (MPH) abuse damages brain cells. The neuroprotective effects of topiramate (TPM) have been reported previously, but its exact mechanism of action still remains unclear. This study investigated the in vivo role of various doses of TPM in the protection of rat amygdala cells against methylphenidate-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. Seventy adult male rats were divided into seven groups. Groups 1 and 2 received normal saline (0.7 ml/rat) and MPH (10 mg/kg), respectively, for 21 days...
September 24, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Yuqiu Wu, Masayo Shamoto-Nagai, Wakako Maruyama, Toshihiko Osawa, Makoto Naoi
Epidemiological studies present the beneficial effects of dietary habits on prevention of aging-associated decline of brain function. Phytochemicals, the second metabolites of food, protect neuronal cells from cell death in cellular models of neurodegenerative disorders, and the neuroprotective activity has been ascribed to the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. In this paper, the cellular mechanism of neuroprotection by phytochemicals was investigated, using the cellular model of mitochondrial apoptosis induced by PK11195, a ligand of outer membrane translocator protein, in SH-SY5Y cells...
September 17, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Chi-Jing Choong, Hideki Mochizuki
Parkinson's disease (PD) presents a relative selective localization of pathology to substantia nigra and well-defined motor symptoms caused by dopaminergic degeneration that makes it an ideal target for gene therapy. Parallel progress in viral vector systems enables the delivery of therapeutic genes directly into brain with reasonable safety along with sustained transgene expression. To date, gene therapy for PD that has reached clinical trial evaluation is mainly based on symptomatic approach that involves enzyme replacement strategy and restorative approach that depends on the addition of neurotrophic factors...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Gábor Veres, Annamária Fejes-Szabó, Dénes Zádori, Gábor Nagy-Grócz, Anna M László, Attila Bajtai, István Mándity, Márton Szentirmai, Zsuzsanna Bohár, Klaudia Laborc, István Szatmári, Ferenc Fülöp, László Vécsei, Árpád Párdutz
Kynurenic acid (KYNA) has well-established protective properties against glutamatergic neurotransmission, which plays an essential role in the activation and sensitization process during some primary headache disorders. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of two KYNA analogs, N-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)-4-oxo-1H-quinoline-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (KA-1) and N-(2-N-pyrrolidinylethyl)-4-oxo-1H-quinoline-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (KA-2), in the orofacial formalin test of trigeminal pain. Following pretreatment with KA-1 or KA-2, rats were injected with subcutaneous formalin solution in the right whisker pad...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Karin Fehsel, Tamara Schikowski, Michaela Jänner, Anke Hüls, Mohammed Voussoughi, Thomas Schulte, Andrea Vierkötter, Tom Teichert, Christian Herder, Dorothea Sugiri, Ursula Krämer, Christian Luckhaus
Genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's dementia. Besides known genetic risk factors like the apolipoprotein (APO) Eε4 allele, single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) of the estrogen receptors (ESRs) are candidate genetic risk factors, while air pollution represents an environmental risk factor for dementia. Effects of these risk factors and their interaction were investigated in the SALIA cohort of 834 non-demented elderly women. Cognitive function was assessed by the CERAD-plus test battery...
September 14, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
L Tatu, W H Jost
At first glance, cervical dystonia might be an illustration of the well-known proposition "function follows form". Nevertheless, cervical dystonia is a highly non-physiological condition, which cannot be reproduced by healthy subjects and does not respond to the usual physiological rules. "Dysfunction follows form" might be the most accurate aphorism to define cervical dystonia. Taking into account this situation and recent insights, the anatomic approach needs to be adapted to allow a better understanding of semiology and to improve botulinum toxin therapy...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Oren S Cohen, Joab Chapman, Amos D Korczyn, Oliver L Siaw, Naama Warman-Alaluf, Zeev Nitsan, Shmuel Appel, Esther Kahana, Hanna Rosenmann, Chen Hoffmann
The use of diffusion MRI improved the accuracy of diagnosis in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and expanded our knowledge of the changes occurring in the brain during the disease. The aim of this study was to test whether in patients with E200K familial CJD (fCJD) the clinical severity correlates with the disease burden as reflected by the extent of cortical involvement in DWI MRI. Consecutive fCJD patients were examined by a neurologist who performed several tests including the CJD neurological scale (CJD-NS), MiniMental status examination (MMSE), Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and the expanded disability status scale (EDSS)...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Tim Vanbellingen, Manuela Wapp, Katharina Stegmayer, Manuel Bertschi, Eugenio Abela, Stefanie Kübel, Thomas Nyffeler, René Müri, Sebastian Walther, Tobias Nef, Mark Hallett, Stephan Bohlhalter
Dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) is thought to play a role in fine motor control. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether inhibitory or excitatory stimulation of PMd would have an impact on manual dexterity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifteen patients with PD participated in this study. High resolution structural MRI was used for neuro-navigated TBS. Participants were targeted with one train of TBS in three experimental sessions: sham stimulation over vertex, continuous TBS (cTBS) over PMd and intermittent TBS (iTBS) over PMd, respectively...
September 12, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Tommaso Martino, Donato Melchionda, Paolo Tonti, Vincenzo De Francesco, Alessandra Lalla, Luigi Maria Specchio, Carlo Avolio
Apparently, unexplained weight loss is a common symptom experienced by patients affected by Parkinson's disease, especially in those treated by levodopa-carbidopa infusion gel (LCIG) with a poor control of dyskinesias. Weight loss is considered part of gastrointestinal dysfunction seen in patients affected by Parkinson's disease, along with gastroparesis and reduced bowel peristalsis. In patients treated with LCIG, weight loss needs to be accurately evaluated, because of possible underlying life-threatening adverse events, like duodenum decubitus ulcer...
September 10, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Jose Martin Rabey, Evgenia Dobronevsky
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia among the elderly. Common treatments available and non-pharmacological interventions have their limitations, and new therapeutic approaches are critically needed. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that generates an electric current-inducing modulation in cortical excitability. The previous clinical trials showed that combinations of rTMS and cognitive training (rTMS-COG), as provided by the NeuroAD medical device system, offer a novel, safe, and effective method improving mild-to-moderate AD patients...
September 8, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Xiao-Lu Niu, Li Liu, Zhi-Xiu Song, Qing Li, Zhi-Hua Wang, Jian-Long Zhang, He-Hua Li
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with gastrointestinal motility abnormalities that could favor the occurrence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of SIBO in Chinese patients with PD and the potential impact of SIBO on gastrointestinal symptoms and motor function. 182 consecutive Chinese patients with PD patients and 200 sex, age, and BMI-matched subjects without PD were included. All participants underwent the glucose breath test to assess SIBO...
September 2, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
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