journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Foot and Ankle Clinics

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729804/hallux-valgus-a-three-dimensional-approach
#1
EDITORIAL
Woo-Chun Lee
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729803/hallux-valgus-medial-column-instability-and-their-relationship-with-posterior-tibial-tendon-dysfunction
#2
REVIEW
Steven Blackwood, Leland Gossett
Historically, bunions have focused on the coronal plane; however, there is tension and compression failure in the sagittal plane of the midfoot during arch collapse. Correction of all 3 planes of deformity, coronal, sagittal, and rotational, can be achieved in several ways. Taking a big picture of global foot mechanics by recognizing the common types of conditions associated with arch collapse, including hallux valgus deformities, can serve as a useful roadmap for navigating more complicated deformities where hallux valgus exists...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729802/hallux-valgus-deformity-and-treatment-a-three-dimensional-approach-modified-technique-for-lapidus-procedure
#3
REVIEW
Robert D Santrock, Bret Smith
In a hallux valgus deformity, the problem is deviation of the hallux at the metatarsophalangeal joint and of the first metatarsal at the tarsometatarsal joint. Although anterior-posterior radiograph findings have been prioritized, deviation in the other planes can substantially change visible cues. The modified technique for Lapidus procedure procedure, uses all 3 planes to evaluate and correct the deformity, making radiographic measurements less useful. Using a triplane framework and focusing on the apex of the deformity, all bunions become the same modified technique for Lapidus procedure can be performed regardless of the degree of deformity, always includes triplane correction, and deformity size becomes irrelevant...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729801/hallux-valgus-deformity-and-treatment-a-three-dimensional-approach
#4
REVIEW
Jesse Forbes Doty, Wallace Taylor Harris
The cause and effect between hallux valgus and first ray hypermobility continues to be debated. Understanding the anatomic and radiographic examination of the first metatarsocuneiform (MTC) joint is critical to choosing an appropriate treatment algorithm for the surgical management of hallux valgus deformity. Some studies suggest hypermobility can be corrected without fusing the first MTC joint. Some think hypermobility arises secondarily from malalignment of the soft tissue constraints as the hallux valgus deformity progresses...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729800/proximal-supination-osteotomy-of-the-first-metatarsal-for-hallux-valgus
#5
REVIEW
Ryuzo Okuda
Postoperative recurrence of hallux valgus is a relatively common complication and is associated with unsatisfactory surgical outcomes. Risk factors for postoperative recurrence include a round lateral edge of the first metatarsal head (a positive round sign) and incomplete reduction of the sesamoids. These risk factors may relate to residual pronation of the first metatarsal following surgery. A novel technique of a proximal supination osteotomy, in which varus and pronation of the first metatarsal can be corrected simultaneously, can achieve significant correction in moderate or severe hallux valgus deformity and a low rate of hallux valgus recurrence...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729799/using-the-center-of-rotation-of-angulation-concept-in-hallux-valgus-correction-why-do-we-choose-the-proximal-oblique-sliding-closing-wedge-osteotomy
#6
REVIEW
Emilio Wagner, Cristian Ortiz, Pablo Wagner
Many different surgeries have been proposed for hallux valgus treatment, osteotomies being the currently recommended ones. Because of high recurrence rates, distal, diaphyseal and proximal osteotomies have been used to improve alignment and sesamoid reduction. The center of rotation of angulation (CORA) concept applies to any deformity and helps to completely realign 2 bone segments. When used with proximal osteotomies, bone displacement and angulation is performed obtaining complete deformity correction. The proximal oblique sliding closing wedge (POSCOW) osteotomy follows the CORA concept and permits preoperative planning...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729798/how-do-i-use-the-scarf-osteotomy-to-rotate-the-metatarsal-and-correct-the-deformity-in-three-dimensions
#7
REVIEW
Eric Swanton, Lyndon Mason, Andy Molloy
The scarf osteotomy has become the workhorse procedure for a large proportion of foot and ankle surgeons, especially in Europe, in the treatment of hallux valgus. Such a versatile procedure should not be underestimated, and planning and thought should precede any such procedure. The angle of bone cuts and magnitude of translation dictate the final position, and all movement axes should be given equal attention.
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729797/how-i-use-a-three-dimensional-approach-to-correct-hallux-valgus-with-a-distal-metatarsal-osteotomy
#8
REVIEW
Daniel M G Winson, Anthony Perera
The role of uniplanar osteotomy in correction of multiplanar deformity in hallux valgus is a developing and promising concept. Careful consideration should be given to the literature when considering the concept of preexisting pronation of the metatarsal. Recent weight-bearing computed tomography studies contradict the existing literature and state that there is little or no rotation of the metatarsal; therefore, a multiplanar osteotomy should aim to correct the rotation caused by soft tissue imbalance at the tarsometatarsal and metatarsophalangeal joints rather than in the metatarsal itself...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729796/sesamoid-position-in-hallux-valgus-in-relation-to-the-coronal-rotation-of-the-first-metatarsal
#9
REVIEW
Jin Su Kim, Ki Won Young
Hallux valgus (HV) is not a simple two-dimensional deformity but is instead a three-dimensional deformity that is closely linked to sesamoid position and first metatarsal (MT) pronation. HV may or may not be accompanied by sesamoid subluxation and/or first MT head pronation. Each of these scenarios should be assessed using weighted computed tomography scan preoperatively, and the necessary corrections should be performed accordingly.
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729795/is-the-rotational-deformity-important-in-our-decision-making-process-for-correction-of-hallux-valgus-deformity
#10
REVIEW
Pablo Wagner, Emilio Wagner
Rotational deformity in hallux valgus is a recognized component and a demonstrated recurrence factor in patients who have undergone surgery. More than 20 years ago, publications started reporting metatarsal pronation as part of the hallux valgus pathology. Identifying metatarsal pronation should be part of the preoperative angular measurements. The proximal metatarsal rotational osteotomy and Lapidus fusion are some of the few techniques that reliably correct metatarsal pronation. They have good results, with more nonunions reported for the Lapidus...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729794/comparison-of-three-dimensional-displacement-among-different-metatarsal-osteotomies
#11
REVIEW
Young Yi, Woo-Chun Lee
Hallux valgus is a slowly progressing complex 3-dimensional biomechanical process. Therefore, precise understanding of 3-dimensional deformity is essential for satisfactory clinical result. Uniplanar correction on anteroposterior view of foot would be insufficient, and rotation on frontal plane as well as sagittal alignment should also be well corrected. This article will review the 3-dimensional components of bony displacement in different surgical methods for hallux valgus correction.
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729793/imaging-of-hallux-valgus-how-to-approach-the-deformity
#12
REVIEW
Matthew James Welck, Naji Al-Khudairi
This article describes the pathogenesis of hallux valgus (HV) and the traditional ways to image the deformities. It also discusses up-to-date advances and research in the field of imaging in HV. This includes weight-bearing computed tomography (CT) scanning, MRI, ultrasound and intraoperative imaging.
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29729792/introduction-why-are-there-so-many-different-surgeries-for-hallux-valgus
#13
REVIEW
Niall A Smyth, Amiethab A Aiyer
Hallux valgus is a common pathology of the foot and ankle. Surgical correction of the condition has been described as early as 1836. Since then, numerous different surgical techniques have been documented in the literature. One of the explanations as to why there are so many different surgeries for hallux valgus is the variety of etiologies attributed to causing the condition. This article discusses the etiologies associated with hallux valgus and describes a few of the surgeries commonly used to treat the deformity...
June 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362038/management-of-metatarsalgia-and-lesser-toe-deformities
#14
EDITORIAL
Todd A Irwin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362037/treatment-of-rigid-hammer-toe-deformity-permanent-versus-removable-implant-selection
#15
REVIEW
Jesse F Doty, Jason A Fogleman
Hammer-toe deformities that fail nonoperative treatment can be successfully addressed with proximal interphalangeal joint resection arthroplasty or fusion. The goal of surgery is to eliminate the deformity and rigidly fix the toe in a well-aligned position. Hammer-toe correction procedures can be performed with temporary Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation for 3 to 6 weeks with high success rates. Pain relief with successful hammer-toe correction approaches 90%; patient satisfaction rates approximate 84%. Although complication rates are rare in most series, there remains a concern regarding exposed temporary K-wire fixation, which has led to the development of multiple permanent internal fixation options...
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362036/conservative-management-of-metatarsalgia-and-lesser-toe-deformities
#16
REVIEW
Andrew E Federer, David M Tainter, Samuel B Adams, Karl M Schweitzer
There are several forefoot conditions that can result in metatarsal head pain. Various points of the gait cycle can predispose the metatarsal heads to pain based on intrinsic and extrinsic imbalances. Metatarsalgia can further be classified according to primary, secondary, or iatrogenic etiologies. Within these groups, conservative management is the first line of treatment and can often obviate surgical intervention. Depending on the cause of pain, proper shoewear, orthoses, and inserts coupled with targeted physical therapy can alleviate most symptoms of metatarsalgia and lesser toe deformities...
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362035/treatment-of-flexible-lesser-toe-deformities
#17
REVIEW
Solenne Frey-Ollivier, Fernanda Catena, Marianne Hélix-Giordanino, Barbara Piclet-Legré
Lesser toe deformities are among the most common complaints presented to foot and ankle specialists. These deformities present in variable ways, which makes surgical decision making complex. For every type of deformity, there could be a combination of soft tissues and bony procedures, chosen according to the surgeon's preferences. This article first describes modern classification of lesser toe deformities, and then presents the different treatments and procedures available for those flexible deformities. In addition, this article proposes an algorithm based on clinical/radiological evaluation and step-by-step surgical decision making...
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362034/gastrocnemius-recession-for-metatarsalgia
#18
REVIEW
Rose E Cortina, Brandon L Morris, Bryan G Vopat
Metatarsalgia is a common cause of plantar forefoot pain. Causes of metatarsalgia include foot anatomy, gait mechanics, and foot and ankle deformity. One specific cause, mechanical metatarsalgia, occurs because of gastrocnemius muscle contracture, which overloads the forefoot. Muscular imbalance of the gastrocnemius complex alters gait mechanics, which increases recruitment of the toe extensor musculature, thereby altering forefoot pressure. Patients with concomitant metatarsalgia and gastrocnemius contracture demonstrate ankle equinus and a positive Silfverskiold test...
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362033/metatarsal-osteotomies-complications
#19
REVIEW
Veerabhadra Babu Reddy
Metatarsal osteotomies can be divided into proximal and distal. The proximal osteotomies, such as the oblique, segmental, set cut, and Barouk-Rippstein-Toullec (BRT) osteotomy, all provide the ability to significantly change the position of the metatarsal head without violating the joint. These osteotomies, however, have a high rate of nonunion when done without internal fixation and can lead to transfer metatarsalgia when done without regard to the parabola of metatarsal head position. Distal osteotomies such as the Weil and Helal offer superior healing but have an increased incidence of recurrent metatarsalgia, joint stiffness, and floating toe...
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29362032/treatment-of-metatarsalgia-with-proximal-osteotomies
#20
REVIEW
Emily C Vafek, Simon Lee
Metatarsalgia is among the most common sources of forefoot pain. Proximal metatarsal osteotomies are an important technique in the armamentarium of the surgeon treating metatarsalgia that has failed nonoperative management. Proximal osteotomies can provide powerful deformity correction with precise control to both shorten and elevate the metatarsal head. However, they can be technically challenging, difficult to attain satisfactory fixation, require increased postoperative immobilization, and can result in transfer lesions...
March 2018: Foot and Ankle Clinics
journal
journal
32632
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"