journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Foot and Ankle Clinics

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078833/all-those-worms
#1
EDITORIAL
Selene G Parekh
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078832/chronic-rupture-of-the-peroneal-tendons
#2
REVIEW
Kamran S Hamid, Annunziato Amendola
Chronic rupture of the peroneal tendons can be a functionally limiting condition with a multitude of causes. Conservative and operative interventions are heterogenous and tailored to the functional demands of the patient. Surgical plans are based on muscle viability, patient preference, and surgeon expertise. Clinical outcomes evidence remains limited in this domain, and further well-designed studies are warranted to guide treatment.
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078831/acute-peroneal-injury
#3
REVIEW
James W Brodsky, Jacob R Zide, Justin M Kane
A high clinical suspicion and greater understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology of lateral ankle injuries have enabled early diagnosis and treatment-improving outcomes of acute peroneal tendon tears. Multiple conditions can be the cause of lateral ankle pain attributed to the peroneal tendons: tenosynovitis, tendinosis, subluxation and dislocation, stenosing tenosynovitis, abnormality related to the os peroneum, as well as tears of the peroneal tendons. It is imperative for the clinician to maintain a high suspicion for peroneal tendon abnormality when evaluating patients with lateral ankle pain...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078830/treatment-of-acute-and-chronic-tibialis-anterior-tendon-rupture-and-tendinopathy
#4
REVIEW
Elizabeth Harkin, Michael Pinzur, Adam Schiff
Tibialis anterior (TA) tendon rupture is a rare injury that has been described and studied in orthopedic literature through case reports and low-volume case studies. This article reviews the current literature on TA tendinosis and acute and chronic ruptures. It discusses the patient presentation, physical examination, nonoperative management, surgical treatment options, and outcomes.
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078829/what-do-you-do-with-the-achilles-if-you-have-no-fancy-toys
#5
REVIEW
Rajiv Shah, Sampat Dumbre Patil
Surgical management of Achilles disorders warrants excision of the degenerated tendon and removal of impinging bone. Resulting defects can be bridged by various methods. Although FHL is the most commonly used tendon for transfer, large defects in cases of chronic Achilles ruptures may be bridged by use of a distant donor tendon. Bony anchorage of a lengthened or transferred tendon into the calcaneus can be done with suture anchors or with interference screws. In developing countries, such implants may not be available or affordable, necessitating the adoption of innovative ways to anchor tendons into the calcaneus...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078828/using-arthroscopic-techniques-for-achilles-pathology
#6
REVIEW
Rebecca Cerrato, Paul Switaj
Endoscopically assisted procedures have been established to provide the surgeon with minimally invasive techniques to address common Achilles conditions. Modifications to some of these techniques as well as improvements in instrumentation have allowed these procedures to provide similar clinical results to the traditional open surgeries while reducing wound complications and accelerating patient's recoveries. The available literature on these techniques reports consistently good outcomes with few complications, making them appealing for surgeons to adopt...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078827/insertional-tendinopathy-of-the-achilles-debridement-primary-repair-and-when-to-augment
#7
REVIEW
Rachel J Shakked, Steven M Raikin
Insertional Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative enthesopathy associated with pain and dysfunction. Nonsurgical management is first attempted for a period of 3 to 6 months and may consist of physical therapy with eccentric training and other modalities. Surgical treatment can be successful with a variety of approaches. A thorough debridement through a midline tendon-splitting approach is associated with high satisfaction rates. Flexor hallucis longus transfer to augment the repair is considered in older, heavier patients or if more than 50% of the tendon was debrided...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078826/noninsertional-tendinopathy-of-the-achilles
#8
REVIEW
Avreeta Singh, Arash Calafi, Chris Diefenbach, Chris Kreulen, Eric Giza
Noninsertional Achilles tendinosis is differentiated from insertional Achilles tendinosis based on anatomic location. Tendinosis, as opposed to tendonitis, is primarily a degenerative process and the role of inflammation is believed limited. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy may include overuse leading to repetitive microtrauma, poor vascularity of the tissue, mechanical imbalances of the extremity, or combination of these elements. There is evidence to support eccentric exercise nonoperative management for patients with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078825/treatment-of-neglected-achilles-tendon-ruptures-with-interpositional-allograft
#9
REVIEW
Christopher E Gross, James A Nunley
Although most astute clinicians can diagnose Achilles tendon ruptures by physical examination alone, more than 20% are not accurately diagnosed in a timely fashion. The definition of a "chronic" Achilles tendon rupture in foot and ankle literature varies widely: from 4 to 10 weeks status after injury. Neglected or chronic Achilles tendon ruptures can be significantly disabling to patients if the muscle-tendon unit is stretched beyond its normal passive limit. There are a variety of treatment options that all have valid uses but have not been proven to be superior to one another...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078824/the-missed-achilles-tear-now-what
#10
REVIEW
Brian D Steginsky, Bryan Van Dyke, Gregory C Berlet
Chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are debilitating injuries and are often associated with large tendon gaps that can be challenging for the foot and ankle surgeon to treat. Preoperative evaluation should include the patient's functional goals, medical comorbidities, MRI assessment of gastrocsoleus muscle viability, condition of adjacent flexor tendons, and size of the tendon defect. Although several surgical techniques have been described, the surgeon must formulate an individualized treatment plan for the patient...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078823/the-acute-injury-of-the-achilles-surgical-options-open-treatment-and-minimally-invasive-surgery
#11
REVIEW
Oliver Schipper, Bruce Cohen
Achilles tendon rupture is a common lower extremity injury seen in the active population. Although reruptures rates have improved with nonoperative functional management, surgical treatment is still preferred by the authors. Minimally invasive techniques allow optimal Achilles tendon rupture apposition and tensioning, with a reduced risk of soft tissue complications associated with the traditional open repair.
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078822/presentation-diagnosis-and-nonsurgical-treatment-options-of-the-anterior-tibial-tendon-posterior-tibial-tendon-peroneals-and-achilles
#12
REVIEW
David Pedowitz, David Beck
Disorders of the anterior tibial tendon (ATT) are rare, and relatively few series have been described in the literature. Ruptures of the ATT are more common than tendinopathies of the ATT. For those patients with a tendinopathy, initial treatment may include activity and shoe-wear modifications.
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078821/tendonitis-and-tendinopathy-what-are-they-and-how-do-they-evolve
#13
REVIEW
Andrew E Federer, John R Steele, Travis J Dekker, Jordan L Liles, Samuel B Adams
The development of tendinitis and tendinopathy is often multifactorial and the result of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors include anatomic factors, age-related factors, and systemic factors, whereas extrinsic factors include mechanical overload and improper form and equipment. Although tendinitis and tendinopathy are often incorrectly used interchangeably, they are in 2 distinct pathologies. Due to their chronicity and high prevalence in tendons about the ankle, including the Achilles tendon, the posterior tibialis tendon, and the peroneal tendons, tendinitis and tendinopathies cause significant morbidity and are important pathologies for physicians to recognize...
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29078820/understanding-the-anatomy-and-biomechanics-of-ankle-tendons
#14
REVIEW
Christopher P Chiodo
The tendons that cross the ankle are complex and sophisticated structures that enable standing and forward propulsion and the ability to accommodate uneven ground. Understanding the biomechanics and local anatomy of these tendons is essential to the treatment of disorders of the foot and ankle, whether it be in formulating an appropriate physical therapy regimen or planning a reconstructive surgical procedure.
December 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779815/the-flatfoot-even-after-decades-of-work-we-still-need-help-understanding-it
#15
EDITORIAL
J Kent Ellington
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779814/pediatric-flatfoot-pearls-and-pitfalls
#16
REVIEW
Samuel E Ford, Brian P Scannell
Pediatric flatfeet are common, are usually asymptomatic, and typically improve over time as young children age. It is critical to differentiate flexible from rigid flatfeet and to assess for associated Achilles contracture with a careful history, physical examination, and initial radiographs. Although there are limited data, nonsurgical management of symptomatic flatfeet, both flexible and rigid, should be exhausted before considering surgical intervention. If patients fail conservative treatment, surgical management with joint-preserving, deformity-corrective techniques is typically used for pediatric flexible flatfeet in conjunction with deformity-specific soft tissue procedures...
September 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779813/severe-stage-2-fuse-or-reconstruct
#17
REVIEW
Scott B Shawen, Theodora C Dworak
Stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction encompasses a wide range of patients with varying degrees of deformity and function. The spectrum of patients can be difficult to treat with a single surgical approach, as evidenced by the wide range of techniques present in the literature. Severity of the deformity, patient functional level, age, and comorbidities must be considered to determine the best course of treatment. This article examines when fusion versus reconstruction is the appropriate treatment of patients with severe stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and its subclassifications...
September 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779812/management-of-the-malunited-triple-arthrodesis
#18
REVIEW
Jeffrey D Seybold
Malunion remains a common complication after triple arthrodesis, with rates as high as 6% in the reported literature. Careful patient evaluation is critical to determine the location and degree of bony deformity. A stepwise systematic approach to correct hindfoot and midfoot deformity is presented in this article. Few studies have been published to guide foot and ankle surgeons with this difficult clinical scenario, but reports have demonstrated high success rates and low rates of complications after revision triple arthrodesis...
September 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779811/the-undercorrected-flatfoot-reconstruction
#19
REVIEW
Kenneth J Hunt, Ryan P Farmer
In symptomatic patients, undercorrection of a flatfoot deformity can lead to the need for revision surgery to restore functional mechanics and prevent progression of deformity. The underlying cause of undercorrection is failure to fully recognize or understand the extent of the deformity. This article discusses the typical deformities in adult flatfoot and indications for surgical intervention. Also presented are the surgical procedures for the correction of the typical deformity patterns with available outcome statistics and a stepwise algorithm for patient evaluation to assist in treatment and mitigate the risk of undercorrection of deformity...
September 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779810/overcorrected-flatfoot-reconstruction
#20
REVIEW
Todd A Irwin
The overcorrected flatfoot reconstruction is a less common but often difficult sequelae of surgical treatment of the adult acquired flatfoot deformity. Understanding the patient's symptoms and how they correlate to the procedures performed during the index surgery are paramount to determining the appropriate course of treatment. Patients' symptoms may resemble those seen in the cavovarus foot condition, often secondary to overlengthening of the lateral column or excessive displacement of the calcaneal tuberosity...
September 2017: Foot and Ankle Clinics
journal
journal
32632
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"