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Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29310514/is-episodic-memory-performance-more-vulnerable-to-depressive-affect-in-older-adulthood
#1
Jarrett Evans, Neil Charness, Katinka Dijkstra, Joanna M Fitzgibbons, Jong-Sung Yoon
This study examined how age, depressive symptoms, demographic variables, frailty, and health factors jointly influence episodic memory across the lifespan in two large, diverse samples. Hierarchical regression analyses from both samples showed that depressive symptoms negatively impacted episodic memory performance with the effect being more pronounced for older adults. Health and frailty tended not to be associated with episodic memory. However, the main effect of depressive symptoms tended to remain significant over and above other predictors, while the interaction with age was weakened with the addition of demographic variables...
January 9, 2018: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29303030/the-relationships-between-perceived-control-and-episodic-memory-in-adulthood-a-review
#2
Candice Maggio, Andrea Soubelet, Sylvane Faure, Isabelle Fort
The goal of the current paper is to review the literature on the relationships between perceived control and episodic memory throughout adulthood. More specifically, three major questions are pursued: (1) Are higher levels of perceived control related to better memory performance? (2) Is the relationship between perceived control and memory similar or different as a function of age? (3) Does perceived control moderate memory decline? Although there is a great deal of evidence that perceived control and episodic memory are positively related in adulthood, the current review showed that very few studies have investigated whether age moderated this relationship...
January 5, 2018: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283001/decision-making-competence-in-younger-and-older-adults-which-cognitive-abilities-contribute-to-the-application-of-decision-rules
#3
Alessia Rosi, Wändi Bruine de Bruin, Fabio Del Missier, Elena Cavallini, Riccardo Russo
Older adults perform worse than younger adults when applying decision rules to choose between options that vary along multiple attributes. Although previous studies have shown that general fluid cognitive abilities contribute to the accurate application of decision rules, relatively little is known about which specific cognitive abilities play the most important role. We examined the independent roles of working memory, verbal fluency, semantic knowledge, and components of executive functioning. We found that age-related decline in applying decision rules was statistically mediated by age-related decline in working memory and verbal fluency...
December 28, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261012/the-association-of-anxiety-depression-and-worry-symptoms-on-cognitive-performance-in-older-adults
#4
Alyssa de Vito, Matthew Calamia, Steven Greening, Scott Roye
Emerging research suggests that a relationship exists between the cognitive aspects of anxiety (e.g. worry) and cognitive decline in older adults. The current study examined the association between anxiety, depressive, and worry symptoms on cognitive performance. Participants were 156 older adults enrolled in the Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample Study (NKI-RS).  Hierarchical linear regression analysis was used to determine the unique associations of anxiety, depressive, and worry symptoms on cognitive performance as measured by the Penn Computerized Neurocognitive Battery (Penn CNB), the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS), and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT)...
December 20, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29241403/social-support-and-verbal-interaction-are-differentially-associated-with-cognitive-function-in-midlife-and-older-age
#5
Megan L Zuelsdorff, Rebecca L Koscik, Ozioma C Okonkwo, Paul E Peppard, Bruce P Hermann, Mark A Sager, Sterling C Johnson, Corinne D Engelman
Social engagement is associated with healthy aging and preserved cognition. Two dimensions of engagement, verbal interactions and perceived support, likely impact cognition via distinct mechanistic pathways. We explored the cognitive benefit of each construct among enrollees (N = 1,052, mean age = 60.2 years) in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention study, who provide neuropsychological and sociobehavioral data at two-year intervals. Outcomes included six cognitive factor scores representing key domains of executive function and memory...
December 15, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221428/interactions-between-stereotype-threat-subjective-aging-and-memory-in-older-adults
#6
Manon Marquet, Pierre Missotten, Benoit Dardenne, Stéphane Adam
This study examined whether the effects of stereotype threat on memory and subjective age were moderated by positive age stereotypes and self-perceptions of aging among older adults. Perceived threat as a mechanism underlying these effects was also explored. Results showed that stereotype threat (high vs. low threat) did not affect the dependent variables. Moreover, self-perceptions of aging did not moderate the effect of stereotype threat on the dependent variables. However, for people with more positive age stereotypes, older people under highthreat perceived more threat than people under low threat...
December 8, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29183224/age-related-changes-in-implicit-emotion-processing
#7
Rosa Manenti, Michela Brambilla, Maria Cotelli
The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of older and younger adults on an emotional priming task. Moreover, a nonemotional priming paradigm was used as a control task to disentangle age-related changes due to emotional processing difficulties from modifications due to a decline of executive inhibitory control abilities. Twenty-two young and 22 older healthy participants completed an emotional priming task and a nonemotional priming task. In the older adult group, reaction times in the emotional priming paradigm were not influenced by any of the prime conditions, whereas both groups exhibited similar facilitation effects induced by the congruent prime in the nonemotional task...
November 28, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29179612/self-reference-enhances-relational-memory-in-young-and-older-adults
#8
Mingzhu Hou, Matthew D Grilli, Elizabeth L Glisky
The present study investigated the influence of self-reference on two kinds of relational memory, internal source memory and associative memory, in young and older adults. Participants encoded object-location word pairs using the strategies of imagination and sentence generation, either with reference to themselves or to a famous other (i.e., George Clooney or Oprah Winfrey). Both young and older adults showed memory benefits in the self-reference conditions compared to other-reference conditions on both tests, and the self-referential effects in older adults were not limited by low memory or executive functioning...
November 27, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29157114/self-initiated-object-location-memory-in-young-and-older-adults
#9
Anat Berger-Mandelbaum, Hagit Magen
The present study explored self-initiated object-location memory in ecological contexts, as aspect of memory that is largely absent from the research literature. Young and older adults memorized objects-location associations they selected themselves or object-location associations provided to them, and elaborated on the strategy they used when selecting the locations themselves. Retrieval took place 30 min and 1 month after encoding. The results showed an age-related decline in self-initiated and provided object-location memory...
November 20, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29105548/improving-visual-spatial-working-memory-in-younger-and-older-adults-effects-of-cross-modal-cues
#10
Ashley F Curtis, Gary R Turner, Norman W Park, Susan J E Murtha
Spatially informative auditory and vibrotactile (cross-modal) cues can facilitate attention but little is known about how similar cues influence visual spatial working memory (WM) across the adult lifespan. We investigated the effects of cues (spatially informative or alerting pre-cues vs. no cues), cue modality (auditory vs. vibrotactile vs. visual), memory array size (four vs. six items), and maintenance delay (900 vs. 1800 ms) on visual spatial location WM recognition accuracy in younger adults (YA) and older adults (OA)...
November 6, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29083261/same-face-same-place-different-memory-manner-of-presentation-modulates-the-associative-deficit-in-older-adults
#11
Amy A Overman, Nancy A Dennis, John M McCormick-Huhn, Abigail B Steinsiek, Luisa B Cesar
One of the more severe and consequential memory impairments experienced by older adults is the loss of the ability to form and remember associations. Although the associative deficit is often assumed to be unitary, memory episodes may contain different types of associations (e.g., item-item, item-context). Research in younger adults suggests that these different association types may involve different neural mechanisms. This raises the possibility that different association types are not equally affected by aging...
October 30, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29083260/are-there-age-differences-in-attention-to-emotional-images-following-a-sad-mood-induction-evidence-from-a-free-viewing-eye-tracking-paradigm
#12
Calandra Speirs, Zorry Belchev, Amanda Fernandez, Stephanie Korol, Christopher Sears
Two experiments examined age differences in the effect of a sad mood induction (MI) on attention to emotional images. Younger and older adults viewed sets of four images while their eye gaze was tracked throughout an 8-s presentation. Images were viewed before and after a sad MI to assess the effect of a sad mood on attention to positive and negative scenes. Younger and older adults exhibited positively biased attention after the sad MI, significantly increasing their attention to positive images, with no evidence of an age difference in either experiment...
October 30, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27782780/automatization-of-personal-and-impersonal-discourse-with-narrative-re-telling-as-a-function-of-age
#13
Lauren L Saling, Natasha Laroo, Michael M Saling
When older adults retell an impersonal story, the resulting narratives are typically characterized by more prolixity and less coherence than those produced by younger adults. We aimed to determine whether this pattern is also observed when retelling a personal narrative. Younger and older participants told a personal story three consecutive times. With retelling, no evidence of increased coherence or fluency or reduction in hesitancy was observed for either age group. The nature of autobiographical narrative construction explains why such stories are not subject to automatization...
November 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27775485/computerized-tabletop-games-as-a-form-of-a-video-game-training-for-old-old
#14
Marina Cujzek, Andrea Vranic
This research aimed at investigating the utility of a computerized version of a cognitively stimulating activity as a video game intervention for elderly. The study focused on the effect of a 6-week extensive practice intervention on aspects of cognitive functioning (vigilance, working memory (WM), inhibition, reasoning) of old-old participants (N = 29), randomly assigned to trained or active control group. The difference between groups was in the content of the extended video game practice - cognitively complex card game for trained and computerized version of a simple dice-game of chance for control participants...
November 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27754777/the-relationship-between-face-recognition-ability-and-socioemotional-functioning-throughout-adulthood
#15
Maria Teresa Turano, Maria Pia Viggiano
The relationship between face recognition ability and socioemotional functioning has been widely explored. However, how aging modulates this association regarding both objective performance and subjective-perception is still neglected. Participants, aged between 18 and 81 years, performed a face memory test and completed subjective face recognition and socioemotional questionnaires. General and social anxiety, and neuroticism traits account for the individual variation in face recognition abilities during adulthood...
November 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28990857/the-role-of-regional-heterogeneity-in-age-related-differences-in-functional-hemispheric-asymmetry-an-fmri-study
#16
Jiamin Gladys Heng, Chiao-Yi Wu, Josephine Astrid Archer, Makoto Miyakoshi, Toshiharu Nakai, Shen-Hsing Annabel Chen
Neuroimaging literature has documented age-related hemispheric asymmetry reduction in frontal regions during task performances. As most studies employed working memory paradigms, it is therefore less clear if this pattern of neural reorganization is constrained by working memory processes or it would also emerge in other cognitive domains which are predominantly lateralized. Using blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the present study used a homophone judgment task and a line judgment task to investigate age-related differences in functional hemispheric asymmetry in language and visuospatial processing respectively...
October 9, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28954577/corrigendum
#17
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 28, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922094/remembering-but-not-knowing-disturbs-the-relational-bindings-newly-established-in-short-term-working-memory-an-age-group-comparison
#18
Arnaud Boujut, David Clarys
The aim of this study was to highlight that episodic memory and working memory compete for the same resource, which would be diminished in aging. Using the remember/know paradigm, we compared the interference related to the retrieval of words on the parallel processing of preestablished relational bindings (Shifting condition) or newly established relational bindings (Updating condition). Within each age-group, participants had comparable performances in remembering across recognition conditions. However, the results showed that only updating activity was impaired after a remember response was given in the younger group...
September 18, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922067/conceptual-elaboration-versus-direct-lexical-access-in-wais-similarities-differential-effects-of-white-matter-lesions-and-gray-matter-volumes
#19
Sven-Erik Fernaeus, Åke Hellström
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) subscale Similarities have been classified as a test of either verbal comprehension or of inductive reasoning. The reason may be that items divide into two categories. We tested the hypothesis of heterogeneity of items in WAIS-Similarities. Consecutive patients at a memory clinic and healthy controls participated in the study. White-matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and normalized temporal lobe volumes were measured based on Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI), and tests of verbal memory and attention were used in addition to WAIS-Similarities to collect behavioural data...
September 18, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28914150/a-computerized-test-for-the-assessment-of-mild-cognitive-impairment-subtypes-in-sentence-processing
#20
Sofia Segkouli, Ioannis Paliokas, Dimitrios Tzovaras, Ioulietta Lazarou, Charalampos Karagiannidis, Filippos Vlachos, Magda Tsolaki
This study examines thesentence processing ability of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subtypes. In addition to standard MCI neuropsychological tests, an experimental approach was applied to assess language. 133 people (93 MCI/40 controls) participated in novel computerized sentence processing tasks. Results presented statistically significant differences between MCI/controls andMCI subtypes (ANOVA):(a) duration F(2,92) = 19.259,p < .001) in sentence construction; (b) correct answers (F(2, 89) = 8.560,p < ...
September 15, 2017: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
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