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Journal of Occupational Health Psychology

Constanze Eib, Claudia Bernhard-Oettel, Linda L Magnusson Hanson, Constanze Leineweber
Organizational justice perceptions are considered a predictor of health and well-being. To date, empirical evidence about whether organizational justice perceptions predict health or health predicts organizational justice perceptions is mixed. Furthermore, the processes underlying these relationships are largely unknown. In this article, we study whether bidirectional relationships can be explained by 2 different mediation mechanisms. First, based on the allostatic load model, we suggest that the relationships between organizational justice perceptions and different health indicators are mediated through mental preoccupation with work...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Erin M Eatough, Chu-Hsiang Chang
This study examined the interactive effects of interpersonal conflict at work, coping strategy, and perceived control specific to the conflict on employee work strain using multisource and time-lagged data across two samples. In Sample 1, multisource data was collected from 438 employees as well as data from participant-identified secondary sources (e.g., significant others, best friends). In Sample 2, time-lagged data from 100 full-time employees was collected in a constructive replication. Overall, findings suggested that the success of coping efforts as indicated by lower strains hinges on the combination of the severity of the stressor, perceived control over the stressor, and coping strategy used (problem-focused vs...
January 11, 2018: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Clare Shann, Angela Martin, Andrea Chester, Scott Ruddock
Addressing the stigma of mental illness and its effect in the workplace is a contemporary issue in occupational health. The role of leaders is a vital but relatively unexplored dimension of this phenomenon. This study examined the effectiveness and application of an online intervention to reduce depression-related stigma in organizational leaders. A randomized controlled, "in the field" study was conducted with 196 leaders. Participants completed an online survey and were randomly assigned to either the experimental or wait-list control group...
January 4, 2018: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Changguo Mao, Chu-Hsiang Chang, Russell E Johnson, Jianmin Sun
Drawing from the transactional model of stress, we examined how the social context moderates employees' behavioral responses to workplace incivility. On the basis of data from 384 employees nested in 41 groups, we observed a 3-way, cross-level interaction between individually experienced incivility, group incivility differentiation, and group silence predicting supervisor-rated employee performance, citizenship, and counterproductive behaviors. Specifically, employees' own incivility experiences predicted lower performance and citizenship behavior and higher counterproductive behavior in groups where members received highly different incivility treatment and kept silent...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Jason C Gawke, Marjan J Gorgievski, Arnold B Bakker
Ample studies have confirmed the benefits of intrapreneurship (i.e., employee behaviors that contribute to new venture creation and strategic renewal activities) for firm performance, but research on the personal costs and benefits of engaging in intrapreneurial activities for employees is lacking. Building on job demands-resources and reinforcement sensitivity theories, we examined how employees' reinforcement sensitivity qualified the relationship among their intrapreneurial behavior, subjective well-being, and other-rated job performance...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Barbara Stiglbauer, Carrie Kovacs
In organizational psychology research, autonomy is generally seen as a job resource with a monotone positive relationship with desired occupational outcomes such as well-being. However, both Warr's vitamin model and person-environment (PE) fit theory suggest that negative outcomes may result from excesses of some job resources, including autonomy. Thus, the current studies used survey methodology to explore cross-sectional relationships between environmental autonomy, person-environment autonomy (mis)fit, and well-being...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Emily J Lawrie, Michelle R Tuckey, Maureen F Dollard
Despite a surge in workplace mindfulness research, virtually nothing is known about how organizations can cultivate everyday mindfulness at work. Using the extended job demands-resources model, we explored daily psychological demands and job control as potential antecedents of daily mindfulness, and the moderating effect of psychosocial safety climate (PSC, which relates to the value organizations place on psychological health at work). We also examined the relationship between mindfulness and learning to augment understanding of the benefits of everyday mindfulness at work...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Dawn S Carlson, Merideth J Thompson, Wayne S Crawford, Wendy R Boswell, Dwayne Whitten
The use of mobile technology for work purposes during family time has been found to affect employees' work and family lives. Using a matched sample of 344 job incumbents and their spouses, we examined the role of mobile device (MD) use for work during family time in the job incumbent-spouse relationship and how this MD use crosses over to affect the spouse's work life. Integrating the work-home resources model with family systems theory, we found that as job incumbents engage in MD use for work during family time, work-to-family conflict increases, as does the combined experience of relationship tension between job incumbents and spouses...
December 7, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Ellen Ernst Kossek, Rebecca J Thompson, Katie M Lawson, Todd Bodner, Matthew B Perrigino, Leslie B Hammer, Orfeu M Buxton, David M Almeida, Phyllis Moen, David A Hurtado, Brad Wipfli, Lisa F Berkman, Jeremy W Bray
Although job stress models suggest that changing the work social environment to increase job resources improves psychological health, many intervention studies have weak designs and overlook influences of family caregiving demands. We tested the effects of an organizational intervention designed to increase supervisor social support for work and nonwork roles, and job control in a results-oriented work environment on the stress and psychological distress of health care employees who care for the elderly, while simultaneously considering their own family caregiving responsibilities...
December 7, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Daniela Pachler, Angela Kuonath, Julia Specht, Silja Kennecke, Maria Agthe, Dieter Frey
Workflow interruptions are one of the most commonly experienced stressors at work. This research expands existing literature on workflow interruptions in a diary field study. We apply a within-person approach and investigate detrimental effects of daily workflow interruptions on both daily satisfaction with performance and daily emotional exhaustion. Furthermore, we introduce polychronicity (the trait-like preference of a person to deal with several activities at the same time) as a buffering factor in this relationship...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Alisha McGregor, Rajeev Sharma, Christopher Magee, Peter Caputi, Donald Iverson
The purpose of the present study is to theorize and test the moderating effects of two variables-the way presenteeism is operationalized and the presence of a preexisting chronic health condition-on the relationships between presenteeism and its antecedents (i.e., physical health, mental health, work factors, social factors, and personal factors). A meta-analysis of 116 studies (N = 301,402) investigated the impact of both moderator variables while controlling for the country of the sample and publication source...
October 5, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Anna Finnes, Ata Ghaderi, JoAnne Dahl, Anna Nager, Pia Enebrink
Mental disorders contribute to high rates of sickness absence (SA) and impaired work functioning. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of 3 interventions targeting SA of workers. Participants (n = 352; 78.4% females) of working age with current employment, and SA due to depression, anxiety disorders, or exhaustion disorder, were recruited to the study and randomized to (a) acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), (b) a workplace dialogue intervention (WDI), (c) a combination of ACT and WDI, or (d) treatment as usual (TAU)...
September 28, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Catherine J Ott-Holland, William J Shepherd, Ann Marie Ryan
The return on investment of employer wellness programs has been heavily debated in recent years, yet existing research has failed to adequately assess the psychological factors that motivate program participation and how participation relates to organizationally relevant employee attitudes and behaviors. Using data over a 3-year period, we found beliefs about the value of employee wellness programs and perceived organizational support (POS) for wellness to be linked to wellness program participation through the mediation of intention to participate in the wellness program...
September 4, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Stephanie Tremmel, Sabine Sonnentag
Incivility by coworkers and customers can have detrimental consequences for employees' affective well-being at work. However, little is known about whether incivility also impairs employees' affect at home and how long these negative effects may last. In this diary study, we examine whether incivility by coworkers and customers is related to next-morning negative affect via negative affect at the end of the workday and at bedtime, and investigate different modes of social sharing (i.e., conversations about experienced mistreatment) as day-level moderators of this relationship...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Ali Afsharian, Amy Zadow, Maureen F Dollard, Christian Dormann, Tahereh Ziaian
Psychosocial safety climate (PSC; climate for psychological health) is an organizational antecedent to work conditions articulated in the job demands-resources model. We responded to calls for broader consideration of organizational climate in terms of both climate level and strength. We tested PSC level and strength as main and interactive predictors of work conditions, psychological health, and engagement. Using multilevel analysis and cross-sectional data, the effects of unit-level PSC constructs were investigated in 21 hospital work units (n = 249 employees) in Australia...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Sara De Gieter, Joeri Hofmans, Arnold B Bakker
We performed a daily diary study to examine the mediating role of autonomy need satisfaction and competence need satisfaction in the relationships between job characteristics (i.e., job resources, challenge and hindrance demands) and strain and performance. For 10 consecutive working days, 194 employees reported on their daily job resources, challenge and hindrance demands, task performance, strain level, and satisfaction of the needs for competence and autonomy. Multilevel path modeling demonstrated that the within-person relationships between job resources, challenge and hindrance demands, and strain are mediated by autonomy need satisfaction, but not by competence need satisfaction...
August 24, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Kathi N Miner, Ismael Diaz, R Linden Wooderson, Jennifer N McDonald, Amber L Smittick, Laura C Lomeli
Andersson and Pearson's (1999) seminal article on workplace incivility has paved the way for nearly two decades of research focusing on rude and discourteous behavior at work. We now have a better understanding of the dynamics associated with uncivil workplace interactions including the characteristics of those who instigate and are targeted with workplace incivility, the negative consequences of incivility, the mechanisms that link incivility and negative outcomes, and the boundary conditions that affect these relationships...
July 27, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Peter Warr
This study compares personal values and forms of happiness between self-employed workers and those employed in an organization. Values are examined through Schwartz's (1999) established model, and happiness is measured in terms of personal flourishing and both job-specific and general hedonic well-being. In two nationally representative samples, self-employed workers are found to value self-direction and stimulation in their lives to a significantly greater degree than do organizational employees, but not to differ in other types of value...
July 27, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Niklas K Steffens, Jie Yang, Jolanda Jetten, S Alexander Haslam, Jukka Lipponen
The present research expands upon previous theory and empirical work concerning the leadership-health link by examining the lagged effects of leader identity entrepreneurship (i.e., leaders' creation of a sense of "we" and "us" among team members) on team members' burnout, work engagementi and turnover intentions. We report results from a 2-wave field study with employees from a large solar panel producing organization in China conducted over a 10-month period. Findings indicate that perceived leader identity entrepreneurship predicted greater subsequent work engagement among team members, as well as lower subsequent burnout and turnover intentions...
July 27, 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Sabine Sonnentag, Laura Venz, Anne Casper
Job-stress recovery during nonwork time is an important factor for employee well-being. This article reviews the recovery literature, starting with a brief historical overview. It provides a definition of recovery that differentiates between recovery as a process and recovery as an outcome. Empirical studies have shown that recovery activities (e.g., physical exercise) and recovery experiences (e.g., psychological detachment from work) are negatively associated with strain symptoms (e.g., exhaustion) and positively associated with positive well-being indicators (e...
July 2017: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
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