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Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30426324/impact-of-funding-allocation-on-physical-therapist-research-productivity-and-dpt-student-graduates-an-analysis-using-panel-data
#1
Tara Dickson, P Daniel Chen, Barrett Taylor
Financial support for institutional research is relatively stagnant, and thus institutions are likely to seek tuition revenue to offset the costs of research and teaching. It is likely that this has led to increases in tuition driven activities, and thus has limited research activities of academic physical therapy (PT) programs in particular. However, the relationships between sources of program revenue, the number of graduates from PT programs, and the scholarly production of PT faculty have not been studied...
November 13, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30421251/early-identification-of-first-year-students-at-risk-of-dropping-out-of-high-school-entry-medical-school-the-usefulness-of-teachers-ratings-of-class-participation
#2
Alexandra M Araújo, Carlos Leite, Patrício Costa, Manuel João Costa
Dropping out from undergraduate medical education is costly for students, medical schools, and society in general. Therefore, the early identification of potential dropout students is important. The contribution of personal features to dropout rates has merited exploration. However, there is a paucity of research on aspects of student experience that may lead to dropping out. In this study, underpinned by theoretical models of student commitment, involvement, and engagement, we explored the hypothesis of using inferior participation as an indicator of a higher probability of dropping out in year 1...
November 12, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30390181/comfort-with-uncertainty-reframing-our-conceptions-of-how-clinicians-navigate-complex-clinical-situations
#3
REVIEW
Jonathan S Ilgen, Kevin W Eva, Anique de Bruin, David A Cook, Glenn Regehr
Learning to take safe and effective action in complex settings rife with uncertainty is essential for patient safety and quality care. Doing so is not easy for trainees, as they often consider certainty to be a necessary precursor for action and subsequently struggle in these settings. Understanding how skillful clinicians work comfortably when uncertain, therefore, offers an important opportunity to facilitate trainees' clinical reasoning development. This critical review aims to define and elaborate the concept of 'comfort with uncertainty' in clinical settings by juxtaposing a variety of frameworks and theories in ways that generate more deliberate ways of thinking about, and researching, this phenomenon...
November 2, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30387053/developing-a-two-dimensional-model-of-unprofessional-behaviour-profiles-in-medical-students
#4
Marianne C Mak-van der Vossen, Anne de la Croix, Arianne Teherani, Walther N K A van Mook, Gerda Croiset, Rashmi A Kusurkar
Standardized narratives or profiles can facilitate identification of poor professional behaviour of medical students. If unprofessional behaviour is identified, educators can help the student to improve their professional performance. In an earlier study, based on opinions of frontline teachers from one institution, the authors identified three profiles of medical students' unprofessional behaviour: (1) Poor reliability, (2) Poor reliability and poor insight, and (3) Poor reliability, poor insight and poor adaptability...
November 1, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30382496/supporting-self-regulation-in-simulation-based-education-a-randomized-experiment-of-practice-schedules-and-goals
#5
David A Cook, Yazan Aljamal, V Shane Pankratz, Robert E Sedlack, David R Farley, Ryan Brydges
Self-regulated learning is optimized when instructional supports are provided. We evaluated three supports for self-regulated simulation-based training: practice schedules, normative comparisons, and learning goals. Participants practiced 5 endoscopy tasks on a physical simulator, then completed 4 repetitions on a virtual reality simulator. Study A compared two practice schedules: sequential (master each task in assigned order) versus unstructured (trainee-defined). Study B compared normative comparisons framed as success (10% of trainees were successful) versus failure (90% of trainees were unsuccessful)...
October 31, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30362027/the-optimal-number-of-options-for-multiple-choice-questions-on-high-stakes-tests-application-of-a-revised-index-for-detecting-nonfunctional-distractors
#6
Mark R Raymond, Craig Stevens, S Deniz Bucak
Research suggests that the three-option format is optimal for multiple choice questions (MCQs). This conclusion is supported by numerous studies showing that most distractors (i.e., incorrect answers) are selected by so few examinees that they are essentially nonfunctional. However, nearly all studies have defined a distractor as nonfunctional if it is selected by fewer than 5% of examinees. A limitation of this definition is that the proportion of examinees available to choose a distractor depends on overall item difficulty...
October 25, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30343408/peer-instruction-improves-comprehension-and-transfer-of-physiological-concepts-a-randomized-comparison-with-self-explanation
#7
Marjolein Versteeg, Floris M van Blankenstein, Hein Putter, Paul Steendijk
Comprehension of physiology is essential for development of clinical reasoning. However, medical students often struggle to understand physiological concepts. Interactive learning through Peer instruction (PI) is known to stimulate students' comprehension, but its relative efficacy and working mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated if and how PI could optimize comprehension of physiological concepts and transfer relative to Self-explanation (SE) which is considered a lower-order type of overt learning...
October 20, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30306292/patient-involvement-in-health-professionals-education-a-meta-narrative-review
#8
REVIEW
Paula Rowland, Melanie Anderson, Arno K Kumagai, Sarah McMillan, Vijay K Sandhu, Sylvia Langlois
More than 100 years ago, Osler inspired educators to consider health professions education (HPE) as intricately reliant on patients. Since that time, patient involvement in HPE has taken on many different meanings. The result is a disparate body of literature that is challenging to search, making it difficult to determine how to continue to build knowledge in the field. To address this problem, we conducted a review of the literature on patient involvement in HPE using a meta-narrative approach. The aim of the review was to synthesize how questions of patient involvement in HPE have been considered across various research traditions and over time...
October 10, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30302670/from-opening-the-black-box-to-looking-behind-the-curtain-cognition-and-context-in-assessor-based-judgements
#9
Victor Lee, Keira Brain, Jenepher Martin
The increasing use of direct observation tools to assess routine performance has resulted in the growing reliance on assessor-based judgements in the workplace. However, we have a limited understanding of how assessors make judgements and formulate ratings in real world contexts. The current research on assessor cognition has largely focused on the cognitive domain but the contextual factors are equally important, and both are closely interconnected. This study aimed to explore the perceived cognitive and contextual factors influencing Mini-CEX assessor judgements in the Emergency Department setting...
October 9, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30284068/contradictions-in-clinical-teachers-engagement-in-educational-development-an-activity-theory-analysis
#10
Agnes Elmberger, Erik Björck, Matilda Liljedahl, Juha Nieminen, Klara Bolander Laksov
Many medical universities offer educational development activities to support clinical teachers in their teaching role. Research has focused on the scope and effectiveness of such activities and on why individual teachers attend. However, systemic perspectives that go beyond a focus on individual participants are scarce in the existing literature. Employing activity theory, we explored how clinical teachers' engagement in educational development was affected by the systems they act within. Three focus groups were held with clinical teachers from different professions...
October 3, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30284067/what-attributes-guide-best-practice-for-effective-feedback-a-scoping-review
#11
REVIEW
Christine Ossenberg, Amanda Henderson, Marion Mitchell
There has been an observed increase in literature concerning feedback within the last decade, with the importance of feedback well documented. Current discourse promotes feedback as an interactive, dialogic process between the learner and the learning partner. While much has been written about effective feedback, less is known about key elements that support dialogic feedback. It is therefore important to investigate what is known about the elements that guide best practice for effective feedback. A scoping review of the extant literature following Arksey and O'Malley's methodology was conducted...
October 3, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30259266/moving-beyond-orientations-a-multiple-case-study-of-the-residency-experiences-of-canadian-born-and-immigrant-international-medical-graduates
#12
Umberin Najeeb, Brian Wong, Elisa Hollenberg, Lynfa Stroud, Susan Edwards, Ayelet Kuper
Many international medical graduates (IMGs) enter North American residency programs every year. The Canadian IMG physician pool increasingly includes Canadian-born IMGs (C-IMGs) along with Immigrant-IMGs (I-IMGs). Similar trends exist in the United States. Our objective was to understand the similarities and differences in the challenges faced by both I-IMGs and C-IMGs during residency to identify actionable recommendations to support them during this critical time. We performed a multiple case study of IMGs' experiences at a large Canadian university...
September 27, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30171512/how-well-is-each-learner-learning-validity-investigation-of-a-learning-curve-based-assessment-approach-for-ecg-interpretation
#13
Rose Hatala, Jacqueline Gutman, Matthew Lineberry, Marc Triola, Martin Pusic
Learning curves can support a competency-based approach to assessment for learning. When interpreting repeated assessment data displayed as learning curves, a key assessment question is: "How well is each learner learning?" We outline the validity argument and investigation relevant to this question, for a computer-based repeated assessment of competence in electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation. We developed an on-line ECG learning program based on 292 anonymized ECGs collected from an electronic patient database...
August 31, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30421094/clinical-practice-deliberate-practice-and-big-data
#14
EDITORIAL
Geoff Norman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30168037/is-the-mouth-the-mirror-of-the-mind
#15
EDITORIAL
Geoff Norman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845359/self-efficacy-for-self-regulation-and-fear-of-failure-as-mediators-between-self-esteem-and-academic-procrastination-among-undergraduates-in-health-professions
#16
Yanting Zhang, Siqin Dong, Wenjie Fang, Xiaohui Chai, Jiaojiao Mei, Xiuzhen Fan
Academic procrastination has been a widespread problem behavior among undergraduates. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of academic procrastination among undergraduates in health professions, and explore the mediation effects of self-efficacy for self-regulation and fear of failure in the relationship between self-esteem and academic procrastination. A cross-sectional design was used to study 1184 undergraduates in health professions from China. Participants completed measures of academic procrastination, self-esteem, self-efficacy for self-regulation and fear of failure...
October 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29804269/the-pedagogical-value-of-testing-how-far-does-it-extend
#17
Kevin W Eva, Colleen Brady, Marion Pearson, Katherine Seto
Information is generally more memorable after it is studied and tested than when it is only studied. One must be cautious to use this phenomenon strategically, however, due to uncertainty about whether testing improves memorability for only tested material, facilitates learning of related non-tested content, or inhibits memory of non-tested material. 52 second-year Pharmacy students were asked to study therapeutic aspects of gastroesophageal reflux disease and peptic ulcer disease. One group was given 30 min to study...
October 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29730708/stressing-the-journey-using-life-stories-to-study-medical-student-wellbeing
#18
Tania M Jenkins, Jenny Kim, Chelsea Hu, John C Hickernell, Sarah Watanaskul, John D Yoon
While previous studies have considered medical student burnout and resilience at discrete points in students' training, few studies examine how stressors and resilience-building factors can emerge before, and during, medical school. Our study focuses on students' life stories to comprehensively identify factors contributing to student wellbeing. We performed a secondary analysis of life-story interviews with graduating fourth year medical students. These interviews were originally conducted in 2012 as part of the Project on the Good Physician, and then re-analyzed, focusing on student wellbeing...
October 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691699/subjective-awareness-of-ultrasound-expertise-development-individual-experience-as-a-determinant-of-overconfidence
#19
Jordan Richard Schoenherr, Jason Waechter, Scott J Millington
Medical decision-making requires years of experience in order to develop an adequate level of competence to successfully engage in safe practice. While diagnostic and technical skills are essential, an awareness of the extent and limits of our own knowledge and skills is critical. The present study examines clinicians' subjective awareness in a diagnostic cardiac ultrasound task. Clinicians answered diagnostic and treatment related questions for a range of pathologies. Following these questions, clinicians indicated their level of confidence in their response...
October 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29663182/do-reciprocal-relationships-between-academic-workload-and-self-regulated-learning-predict-medical-freshmen-s-achievement-a-longitudinal-study-on-the-educational-transition-from-secondary-school-to-medical-school
#20
Joselina Barbosa, Álvaro Silva, Maria Amélia Ferreira, Milton Severo
One of the most important factors that makes the transition from secondary school to medical school challenging is the inability to put in the study time that a medical school curriculum demands. The implementation of regulated learning is essential for students to cope with medical course environment and succeed. This study aimed to investigate the reciprocal relationships between self-regulated learning skills (SRLS) and academic workload (AW) across secondary school to medical school transition. Freshmen enrolled in medical school (N = 102) completed questionnaires at the beginning and at the end of their academic year, assessing AW (measured as study time hours and perceived workload), SRLS (planning and strategies for learning assessment, motivation and action to learning and self-directedness) and academic achievement...
October 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
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