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Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice

W E De Leng, K M Stegers-Jager, A Husbands, J S Dowell, M Ph Born, A P N Themmen
Situational Judgment Tests (SJTs) are increasingly used for medical school selection. Scoring an SJT is more complicated than scoring a knowledge test, because there are no objectively correct answers. The scoring method of an SJT may influence the construct and concurrent validity and the adverse impact with respect to non-traditional students. Previous research has compared only a small number of scoring methods and has not studied the effect of scoring method on internal consistency reliability. This study compared 28 different scoring methods for a rating SJT on internal consistency reliability, adverse impact and correlation with personality...
October 18, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Todd P Chang, Sheree M Schrager, Alyssa J Rake, Michael W Chan, Phung K Pham, Grant Christman
Multimedia in assessing clinical decision-making skills (CDMS) has been poorly studied, particularly in comparison to traditional text-based assessments. The literature suggests multimedia is more difficult for trainees. We hypothesize that pediatric residents score lower in diagnostic skill when clinical vignettes use multimedia rather than text for patient findings. A standardized method was developed to write text-based questions from 60 high-resolution, quality multimedia; a series of expert panels selected 40 questions with both a multimedia and text-based counterpart, and two online tests were developed...
October 17, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Timothy K Baker, Gregory S Smith, Negar Nicole Jacobs, Ramona Houmanfar, Robbyn Tolles, Deborah Kuhls, Melissa Piasecki
The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP, Barnes-Holmes et al. in Psychol Rec 60:527-542, 2010) was utilized as a relatively new tool to measure implicit weight bias in first- and third-year medical students. To date, only two studies (Miller et al. in Acad Med 88:978-982, 2013; Phelan et al. in Med Educ 49:983-992, 2015) have investigated implicit weight bias with medical students and both have found pro-thin/anti-fat implicit attitudes, on average, using the Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald and Banaji in Psychol Rev 102:4-27, 1995) as the assessment tool...
October 12, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
R K MacKenzie, J Dowell, D Ayansina, J A Cleland
Traditional methods of assessing personality traits in medical school selection have been heavily criticised. To address this at the point of selection, "non-cognitive" tests were included in the UK Clinical Aptitude Test, the most widely-used aptitude test in UK medical education (UKCAT: ). We examined the predictive validity of these non-cognitive traits with performance during and on exit from medical school. We sampled all students graduating in 2013 from the 30 UKCAT consortium medical schools...
October 4, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Neil Stringer, Michael Chan, Yaw Bimpeh, Philip Chan
This study investigates the effects of socioeconomic status and schooling on the academic attainment of a cohort of students at a single medical school (N = 240). Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to explore how students' summative assessment scores over 4 years of medical school were affected by: attainment in secondary school examinations (GCSEs and A-levels); the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index (IDACI) rank associated with students' home postcodes; the performance of students' A-level institutions, measured as the percentage of A-level students achieving 3 A-levels at AAB or higher in two or more facilitating subjects...
October 4, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Martin V Pusic, Kathy Boutis, Martin R Pecaric, Oleksander Savenkov, Jason W Beckstead, Mohamad Y Jaber
Learning curves are a useful way of representing the rate of learning over time. Features include an index of baseline performance (y-intercept), the efficiency of learning over time (slope parameter) and the maximal theoretical performance achievable (upper asymptote). Each of these parameters can be statistically modelled on an individual and group basis with the resulting estimates being useful to both learners and educators for feedback and educational quality improvement. In this primer, we review various descriptive and modelling techniques appropriate to learning curves including smoothing, regression modelling and application of the Thurstone model...
October 3, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Christina St-Onge, Meredith Young, Kevin W Eva, Brian Hodges
Validity is one of the most debated constructs in our field; debates abound about what is legitimate and what is not, and the word continues to be used in ways that are explicitly disavowed by current practice guidelines. The resultant tensions have not been well characterized, yet their existence suggests that different uses may maintain some value for the user that needs to be better understood. We conducted an empirical form of Discourse Analysis to document the multiple ways in which validity is described, understood, and used in the health professions education field...
October 1, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Beverly W Henry, Derryl E Block, James R Ciesla, Beth Ann McGowan, John A Vozenilek
Literature on telehealth care delivery often addresses clinical, cost, technological, system, and organizational impacts. Less is known about interpersonal behaviors such as communication patterns and therapeutic relationship-building, which may have workforce development considerations. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic literature review to identify interpersonal health care provider (HCP) behaviors and attributes related to provider-patient interaction during care in telehealth delivery...
October 1, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Wael Haddara, Lorelei Lingard
As an ideal, altruism has long enjoyed privileged status in medicine and medical education. As a practice, altruism is perceived to be in decline in the current generation. A number of educational efforts are underway to reclaim this "lost value" of medicine. In this paper we explore constructions of altruism over a defined period of time through a content analysis of the Canadian and Australian Medical Associations (CMA and AMA respectively) Codes of Ethics. We analyzed all editions of both Codes (1868-2004), using a content analysis approach, including thematic analysis...
September 26, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Liam Rourke, Leanna Cruickshank, Larissa Shapke, Anthony Singhal
Researchers have identified a component of the EEG that discriminates visual experts from novices. The marker indexes a comprehensive model of visual processing, and if it is apparent in physicians, it could be used to investigate the development and training of their visual expertise. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a neural marker of visual expertise-the enhanced N170 event-related potential-is apparent in the EEGs of physicians as they interpret diagnostic images. We conducted a controlled trial with 10 cardiologists and 9 pulmonologists...
September 23, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Andrea Gingerich, Susan E Ramlo, Cees P M van der Vleuten, Kevin W Eva, Glenn Regehr
Whenever multiple observers provide ratings, even of the same performance, inter-rater variation is prevalent. The resulting 'idiosyncratic rater variance' is considered to be unusable error of measurement in psychometric models and is a threat to the defensibility of our assessments. Prior studies of inter-rater variation in clinical assessments have used open response formats to gather raters' comments and justifications. This design choice allows participants to use idiosyncratic response styles that could result in a distorted representation of the underlying rater cognition and skew subsequent analyses...
September 20, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Hanne Verweij, Frank M M A van der Heijden, Madelon L M van Hooff, Jelle T Prins, Antoine L M Lagro-Janssen, Hiske van Ravesteijn, Anne E M Speckens
Burnout is highly prevalent in medical residents. In order to prevent or reduce burnout in medical residents, we should gain a better understanding of contributing and protective factors of burnout. Therefore we examined the associations of job demands and resources, home demands and resources, and work-home interferences with burnout in male and female medical residents. This study was conducted on a nation-wide sample of medical residents. In 2005, all Dutch medical residents (n = 5245) received a self-report questionnaire on burnout, job and home demands and resources and work-home interference...
September 20, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Ronald Cusano, Kevin Busche, Sylvain Coderre, Wayne Woloschuk, Karen Chadbolt, Kevin McLaughlin
Despite the fact that the length of medical school training has remained stable for many years, the expectations of graduating medical students (and the schools that train them) continue to increase. In this Reflection, the authors discuss motives for educational inflation and suggest that these are likely innocent, well-intentioned, and subconscious-and include both a propensity to increase expectations of ourselves and others over time, and a reluctance to reduce training content and expectations. They then discuss potential risks of educational inflation, including reduced emphasis on core knowledge and clinical skills, and adverse effects on the emotional, psychological, and financial wellbeing of students...
August 23, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Nikki L Bibler Zaidi, Christopher M Swoboda, Benjamin M Kelcey, R Stephen Manuel
The extant literature has largely ignored a potentially significant source of variance in multiple mini-interview (MMI) scores by "hiding" the variance attributable to the sample of attributes used on an evaluation form. This potential source of hidden variance can be defined as rating items, which typically comprise an MMI evaluation form. Due to its multi-faceted, repeated measures format, reliability for the MMI has been primarily evaluated using generalizability (G) theory. A key assumption of G theory is that G studies model the most important sources of variance to which a researcher plans to generalize...
August 20, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Kayley Lyons, Jacqueline E McLaughlin, Julia Khanova, Mary T Roth
Cognitive apprenticeship theory emphasizes the process of making expert thinking "visible" to students and fostering the cognitive and meta-cognitive processes required for expertise. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the use of cognitive apprenticeship theory with the primary aim of understanding how and to what extent the theory has been applied to the design, implementation, and analysis of education in the health sciences. The initial search yielded 149 articles, with 45 excluded because they contained the term "cognitive apprenticeship" only in reference list...
August 20, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Michelle McLean
Using interpretative phenomenological analysis to make meaning of the experiences of three highly qualified registered nurses who had enrolled in an undergraduate medical programme, this study provides insight into their personal journeys of wanting to become 'different' doctors. In so doing, they conceptualised their future selves as adding clinical reasoning and diagnostic skills to the patient-centred caring ethic of their nursing practice, becoming a multi-skilled community member or helping to fix the health care culture...
July 29, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Danielle Hitch, Kelli Nicola-Richmond
The aim of this study is to update a previous review published in this journal on the effectiveness of teaching and assessment interventions for evidence based practice in health professions, and to determine the extent to which the five recommendations made from that review have been implemented. The Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method was used to synthesise all published evidence from 2011 to 2015, which addressed instructional practices used for evidence based practice with pre-registration allied health students...
July 28, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Salina Juma, Mark Goldszmidt
Research suggests that physicians perform multiple reasoning tasks beyond diagnosis during patient review. However, these remain largely theoretical. The purpose of this study was to explore reasoning tasks in clinical practice during patient admission review. The authors used a constant comparative approach-an iterative and inductive process of coding and recoding-to analyze transcripts from 38 audio-recorded case reviews between junior trainees and their senior residents or attendings. Using a previous list of reasoning tasks, analysis focused on what tasks were performed, when they occurred, and how they related to the other tasks...
July 28, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Alexandra Ferreira-Valente, Joana S Monteiro, Rita M Barbosa, Ana Salgueira, Patrício Costa, Manuel J Costa
Despite the increasing awareness of the relevance of empathy in patient care, some findings suggest that medical schools may be contributing to the deterioration of students' empathy. Therefore, it is important to clarify the magnitude and direction of changes in empathy during medical school. We employed a scoping review to elucidate trends in students' empathy changes/differences throughout medical school and examine potential bias associated with research design. The literature published in English, Spanish, Portuguese and French from 2009 to 2016 was searched...
July 27, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Lyn Li Lean, Ryan Yee Shiun Hong, Lian Kah Ti
Communication of feedback during teaching of practical procedures is a fine balance of structure and timing. We investigate if continuous in-task (IT) or end-task feedback (ET) is more effective in teaching spinal anaesthesia to medical students. End-task feedback was hypothesized to improve both short-term and long-term procedural learning retention as experiential learning promotes active learning after encountering errors during practice. Upon exposure to a 5-min instructional video, students randomized to IT or ET feedbacks were trained using a spinal simulator mannequin...
July 27, 2016: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
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