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Polina Stoycheva, Kaisa Tiippana
The brain's left hemisphere often displays advantages in processing verbal information, while the right hemisphere favours processing non-verbal information. In the haptic domain due to contra-lateral innervations, this functional lateralization is reflected in a hand advantage during certain functions. Findings regarding the hand-hemisphere advantage for haptic information remain contradictory, however. This study addressed these laterality effects and their interaction with memory retention times in the haptic modality...
March 14, 2018: Laterality
Robert D McIntosh, Keira Hillary, Ailbhe Brennan, Magdalena Lechowicz
The writing attempts of children often feature mirror-reversals of individual letters. These reversals are thought to arise from an adaptive tendency to mirror-generalize. However, it is unclear whether mirror-writing is driven by mirror-generalisation of the visual letter forms, or of the actions for writing them. We report two studies of the relationship between mirror-writing and the ability to recognize whether a visually presented letter is in the correct orientation, amongst primary and preschool children learning to read and write in English...
March 2, 2018: Laterality
Priscilla Savopoulos, Annukka K Lindell
Over 100 years ago Lombroso [(1876/2006). Criminal man. Durham: Duke University Press] proposed a biological basis for criminality. Based on inspection of criminals' skulls he theorized that an imbalance of the cerebral hemispheres was amongst 18 distinguishing features of the criminal brain. Specifically, criminals were less lateralized than noncriminals. As the advent of neuroscientific techniques makes more fine-grained inspection of differences in brain structure and function possible, we review criminals' and noncriminals' structural, functional, and behavioural lateralization to evaluate the merits of Lombroso's thesis and investigate the evidence for the biological underpinning of criminal behaviour...
February 15, 2018: Laterality
Chiara Sacco, Rocco Di Michele, Gabriele Semprini, Franco Merni, Gabriele Soffritti
Recently, some studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of two latent variable approaches in which hand preferences are analysed using either latent class methods or latent class factor (LCF) methods. The main aims of this study are: (i) to establish whether these approaches are adequate for assessing footedness, (ii) to evaluate their appropriateness when hand and foot preferences are jointly analysed, and (iii) to measure the association between handedness and footedness based on the examined latent variable models...
February 3, 2018: Laterality
Philip Furley, Jannik Dörr, Florian Loffing
The aim of the present study was to test if lateral preferences of surfers are associated with behaviour and performance depending on the direction of a breaking wave. We hypothesized that wave direction and surf stance interact in creating favourable or debilitative performance demands as surfers are either facing the wave (frontside) or the wave is breaking in the back of the surfers (backside). Study 1 was an online survey collecting self-report data of recreational surfers (n = 394). In Study 2, we analysed all wave scores (n = 2,552) and laterality of professional surfers during the season of 2014...
February 1, 2018: Laterality
Lynn Wright
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 8, 2018: Laterality
Stephen Darling, Dario Cancemi, Sergio Della Sala
A small preference has been observed for people to choose seats on the left of aircraft when booking via an online system. Although this is consistent with pseudoneglect-the known leftward bias in perception and representation-rightward preferences have been commonly observed in seating selection tasks in other environments. Additionally, the previous research in aircraft seating was unable to dissociate a bias to one side of the screen from a bias to one side of the cabin of the aircraft. Here, we present a study in which participants were asked to select seats for a range of fictional flights...
December 20, 2017: Laterality
Carolina Baruzzi, Christian Nawroth, Alan McElligott, Luigi Baciadonna
Behavioural lateralization consists of perceptual and motor lateralization and provides adaptive advantages such as a general increase in brain efficiency. Motor laterality refers to the preferred use of either left or right limbs or organs to perform a specific task. We investigated motor laterality in goats (Capra hircus), using the First-stepping Task. During this task, the first foreleg used to step off a board after standing with both forelimbs was recorded. Subjects varied individually in their expression of motor lateralization with 36...
December 19, 2017: Laterality
Jacques Prieur, Simone Pika, Stéphanie Barbu, Catherine Blois-Heulin
Multifactorial investigations of intraspecific laterality of primates' gestural communication aim to shed light on factors that underlie the evolutionary origins of human handedness and language. This study assesses gorillas' intraspecific gestural laterality considering the effect of various factors related to gestural characteristics, interactional context and sociodemographic characteristics of signaller and recipient. Our question was: which factors influence gorillas' gestural laterality? We studied laterality in three captive groups of gorillas (N = 35) focusing on their most frequent gesture types (N = 16)...
December 5, 2017: Laterality
Charlotte Goursot, Sandra Düpjan, Armin Tuchscherer, Birger Puppe, Lisette M C Leliveld
Motor lateralization is hypothesized to depend on the complexity of the motor function, but it might at the same time reflect hemispheric dominance within an individual across motor functions. We investigated possible motor lateralization patterns in four motor functions of different complexity (snout use in a manipulative task, foot use in two-stepping tasks and tail curling) in the domestic pig, a tetrapod species relevant as farm animal but also as a model in human neuroscience. A significant majority of our sample showed individual biases for manipulation with their snout and for curling their tail...
November 30, 2017: Laterality
Eric Siéroff, Yael Slama
Word processing in left (LVF) and right (RVF) visual fields may be affected by left hemisphere activation during reading and by script direction. We evaluated the effect of script direction by presenting words in left-to-right (French) and right-to-left (Hebrew) scripts to bilingual French participants. Words of different lengths were presented in the LVF and the RVF in a naming task. Results showed (1) a stronger word length effect in the LVF than in the RVF in French, and no difference of word length effect between LVF and RVF in Hebrew; (2) a first-letter advantage only in the LVF in French and in the RVF in Hebrew, showing an effect of script direction on letter processing; and (3) a stronger advantage of external over internal letters in words presented in the LVF than in the RVF for both languages, showing a left hemisphere influence on letter activation...
November 15, 2017: Laterality
Daniel Voyer, Daniel Myles
The present report concerns two experiments extending to unimodal priming the cross-modal priming effects observed with auditory emotions by Harding and Voyer [(2016). Laterality effects in cross-modal affective priming. Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition, 21, 585-605]. Experiment 1 used binaural targets to establish the presence of the priming effect and Experiment 2 used dichotically presented targets to examine auditory asymmetries. In Experiment 1, 82 university students completed a task in which binaural targets consisting of one of 4 English words inflected in one of 4 emotional tones were preceded by binaural primes consisting of one of 4 Mandarin words pronounced in the same (congruent) or different (incongruent) emotional tones...
November 15, 2017: Laterality
Alessio Rossi, Damiano Formenti, Luca Cavaggioni, Alice Morgante, Palmina Caruso, Marco Gargano, Nicola Ludwig, Isabella Merzagora, Giampietro Alberti
Facial asymmetry is considered a marker of psychological, emotional and physiological distress, while anxiety is a behavioural, psychological and physiological response to a threat to well-being. Since individuals respond to anxiety with specific patterns (e.g., muscular tension), it is reasonable to hypothesize that anxiety could contribute to facial tension and therefore facial asymmetry. Instead, since facial asymmetry is perceived as "unpleasant" from peers, its presence may be a hindrance to social adaptation contributing to generate anxiety...
November 3, 2017: Laterality
Mallory L Wiper
Laterality, best understood as asymmetries of bilateral structures or biases in behaviour, has been demonstrated in species from all major vertebrate classes, and in many invertebrates, showing a large degree of evolutionary conservation across vertebrate groups. Despite the establishment of this phenomenon in so many species, however, the evolutionary and mechanistic study of laterality is uneven with numerous areas in this field requiring greater attention. Here, I present a partial review of how far the study of laterality has come, outlining previous pioneering work, I discuss the hypothesized costs and benefits of a lateralized brain and the suggested path of the evolution of laterality for populations and individuals...
November 2017: Laterality
Luisa Girelli, Chiara Valeria Marinelli, Giuseppe Grossi, Lisa S Arduino
Increasing evidence supports the contribution of both biological and cultural factors to visuospatial processing. The present study adds to the literature by exploring the interplay of perceptual and linguistic mechanisms in determining visuospatial asymmetries in adults (Experiment 1) and children (Experiment 2). In particular, pre-schoolers (3 and 5 year-olds), school-aged children (8 year-old), and adult participants were required to bisect different types of stimuli, that is, lines, words, and figure strings...
November 2017: Laterality
M Smit, D I Kooistra, I J M van der Ham, H C Dijkerman
Body ownership has mainly been linked to the right hemisphere and larger interhemispheric connectivity has been shown to be associated with greater right hemispheric activation. Mixed-handed participants tend to have more interhemispheric connectivity compared to extreme handed participants. The aim of this study was to examine whether feelings of ownership as assessed with the rubber hand illusion (RHI) are differentiated by handedness and differed between the left and right hand. Sinistrals-, dextrals-, and mixed-handed individuals (n = 63) were subjected to the RHI...
November 2017: Laterality
Leif Oltedal, Kenneth Hugdahl
Laterality for language processing can be assessed by auditory and visual tasks. Typically, a right ear/right visual half-field (VHF) advantage is observed, reflecting left-hemispheric lateralization for language. Historically, auditory tasks have shown more consistent and reliable results when compared to VHF tasks. While few studies have compared analogous tasks applied to both sensory modalities for the same participants, one such study by Voyer and Boudreau [(2003). Cross-modal correlation of auditory and visual language laterality tasks: a serendipitous finding...
November 2017: Laterality
Ruth E Propper, Kyle Dodd, Stephen D Christman, Tad T Brunyé
Sustained unilateral hand clenching alters perceptual processing and affective/motivational state, with these alterations presumed to reflect increased hemispheric activity contralateral to the side of motor movement. However, data from electroencephalographic and imaging studies are contradictory regarding the relationship between sustained hand clenching and brain activity. In order to investigate the relationship between brain activity, sustained unilateral hand clenching, and changes in affect and perceptual processing, frontal hemispheric activity was measured via functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), using derived O2Hb prior to, during, and post-sustained unilateral hand clench...
November 2017: Laterality
William D Poynter
A small difference in the size of the two pupils is common in healthy individuals, a condition termed benign or physiologic anisocoria (BA). Past research indicates that BA is probably caused by asymmetry in sympathetic nervous system (SNS) function [e.g., Rosenberg (2008). Physiologic anisocoria: A manifestation of a physiologic sympathetic asymmetry. Neuro-Ophthalmology, 32, 147-149]. This study is the first to show that BA varies with psychological factors linked to brain asymmetry and autonomic arousal, including gender, attention, and personality...
November 2017: Laterality
Luigi Zechini, Alison Lilley, Emily Waddell, Thomas J Burns, J Roger Downie, Patrick T Walsh
There is considerable debate about the pattern and origin of laterality in forelimb emergence and turning behaviour within amphibians, with the latter being poorly investigated in tadpoles around metamorphic climax. Using 6 species of metamorphosing anurans, we investigated the effect of asymmetrical spiracle location, and disturbance at the time of forelimb emergence, on the pattern of forelimb emergence. Turning behaviour was observed to assess whether motor lateralization occurred in non-neobatrachian anurans and was linked to patterns of forelimb emergence...
November 2017: Laterality
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