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Laterality

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29768092/are-only-infants-held-more-often-on-the-left-if-so-why-testing-the-attention-emotion-hypothesis-with-an-infant-a-vase-and-two-chimeric-tests-one-emotional-one-not
#1
Lauren Julius Harris, Rodrigo A Cárdenas, Nathaniel D Stewart, Jason B Almerigi
Most adults, especially women, hold infants and dolls but not books or packages on the left side. One reason may be that attention is more often leftward in response to infants, unlike emotionally neutral objects like books and packages. Women's stronger bias may reflect greater responsiveness to infants. Previously, we tested the attention hypothesis by comparing women's side-of-hold of a doll, book, and package with direction-of-attention on the Chimeric Faces Test (CFT) [Harris, L. J., Cárdenas, R. A...
May 16, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29756509/hemispheric-asymmetry-in-holistic-processing-of-words
#2
Paulo Ventura, João Delgado, Miguel Ferreira, António Farinha-Fernandes, José C Guerreiro, Bruno Faustino, Isabel Leite, Alan C-N Wong
Holistic processing has been regarded as a hallmark of face perception, indicating the automatic and obligatory tendency of the visual system to process all face parts as a perceptual unit rather than in isolation. Studies involving lateralized stimulus presentation suggest that the right hemisphere dominates holistic face processing. Holistic processing can also be shown with other categories such as words and thus it is not specific to faces or face-like expertize. Here, we used divided visual field presentation to investigate the possibly different contributions of the two hemispheres for holistic word processing...
May 13, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676220/faces-of-glory-the-left-cheek-posing-bias-for-medallists-of-brazilian-jiu-jitsu-competitions
#3
Matia Okubo
Laboratory studies have shown that people tend to show the left side of their face when asked to broadly express emotions, while they tend to show the right side when asked to hide emotions. Because emotions are expressed more intensely in the left side of the face, it is hypothesized that an individual's intention to express or hide emotions biases the direction of lateral facial poses. The present study tested this hypothesis using photographic portraits of individuals experiencing emotional events in a naturalistic setting: the reception of medals in Brazilian jiu-jitsu competitions...
April 20, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29676213/manual-asymmetry-in-older-adults-on-a-complex-coincidence-anticipation-task
#4
Paula Cristina Dos Santos Rodrigues, João Miguel Carvalho da Silva, João Manuel Pardal Barreiros, Maria Olga Fernandes Vasconcelos
Age-related asymmetrical functional decline was tested in a sample of 57 right-handed volunteers between 65 and 85 years of age. Participants performed a complex coincidence-anticipation (CA) task with both preferred and non-preferred hands. Results demonstrated that the proficiency of a complex CA task was similar for the 2 age groups, but different for the 2 hands. The non-preferred hand was more proficient for temporal accuracy but not for response timing, which was similar for both hands. Moreover, the lack of interaction between age and hand both in response timing and response accuracy reveal symmetric performance across ages...
April 20, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29661048/evidence-for-a-priming-based-asymmetry-in-color-identification
#5
Michael McCormick, John J Seta
Performance asymmetries in colour discrimination (or detection) between visual fields (VFs) are typically examined using mean or median reaction times and have tended to yield either a left VF advantage for all colours (i.e., lower reaction times) or no difference for any colour, although a right VF advantage has also been reported. We used a novel colour identification task in which participants simply identified the colour of a laterally presented rectangle (i.e., red or blue). A measure of priming effects - but not mean or median reaction times - revealed a VF × colour interaction across a pilot study and two experiments; priming for red versus blue stimuli was greater in the left VF and priming for blue stimuli was greater in the right versus left VF...
April 17, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29658376/a-leftward-perceptual-asymmetry-when-judging-the-attractiveness-of-visual-patterns
#6
Paul Rodway, Astrid Schepman, Becky Crossley, Jennifer Lee
Perceptual judgements concerning the magnitude of a stimulus feature are typically influenced more by the left side of the stimulus than by the right side. This research examined whether the leftward bias also applies to judgements of the attractiveness of abstract visual patterns. Across four experiments participants chose between two versions of a stimulus which either had an attractive left side or an attractive right side. Experiments 1 and 2 presented artworks and experiments 3 and 4 presented wallpaper designs...
April 15, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29607706/slow-lorises-nycticebus-spp-display-evidence-of-handedness-in-the-wild-and-in-captivity
#7
Stephanie A Poindexter, Kathleen D Reinhardt, Vincent Nijman, K A I Nekaris
It has been suggested that strepsirrhines (lemurs, lorises, and galagos) retain the more primitive left-hand preference, whilst monkeys and apes more regularly display a right-hand preference at the individual-level. We looked to address questions of laterality in the slow loris (Nycticebus spp.) using spontaneous observations of 7 wild individuals, unimanual tests in 6 captive individuals, and photos of 42 individuals in a bilateral posture assessing handedness at the individual- and group-level. During the unimanual reach task, we found at the individual-level, only 4 slow lorises showed a hand use bias (R: 3, L: 1), Handedness index (HI) ranged from -0...
April 1, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29580172/paw-preferences-in-the-asian-small-clawed-otter-using-an-inexpensive-video-based-protocol-to-study-laterality-of-rare-species-in-the-zoo
#8
Martina Manns, Felix Ströckens, Philipp Stavenhagen, Sebastian Ocklenburg
It is still debated whether limb-use preferences represent a common trait in vertebrates, which is based on a shared phylogenetic history. Unravelling the evolutionary origin and pattern of paw preferences in vertebrates requires the analysis of a larger number of species within an ecologically relevant setting. We therefore investigated whether observations in a zoo enable the collection of reliable data sets by quantifying paw use in two independent groups of Asian small-clawed otters (Amblonyx cinerea). Employing a continuous focal animal sampling method, each day one of the ten individuals was video recorded from outside of the enclosure during usual activity...
March 26, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29536786/exploring-laterality-and-memory-effects-in-the-haptic-discrimination-of-verbal-and-non-verbal-shapes
#9
Polina Stoycheva, Kaisa Tiippana
The brain's left hemisphere often displays advantages in processing verbal information, while the right hemisphere favours processing non-verbal information. In the haptic domain due to contra-lateral innervations, this functional lateralization is reflected in a hand advantage during certain functions. Findings regarding the hand-hemisphere advantage for haptic information remain contradictory, however. This study addressed these laterality effects and their interaction with memory retention times in the haptic modality...
March 14, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29495914/developmental-mirror-writing-is-paralleled-by-orientation-recognition-errors
#10
Robert D McIntosh, Keira Hillary, Ailbhe Brennan, Magdalena Lechowicz
The writing attempts of children often feature mirror-reversals of individual letters. These reversals are thought to arise from an adaptive tendency to mirror-generalize. However, it is unclear whether mirror-writing is driven by mirror-generalisation of the visual letter forms, or of the actions for writing them. We report two studies of the relationship between mirror-writing and the ability to recognize whether a visually presented letter is in the correct orientation, amongst primary and preschool children learning to read and write in English...
March 2, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724337/handedness-effects-of-imagined-fine-motor-movements
#11
Christopher M Donoff, Christopher R Madan, Anthony Singhal
Previous studies of movement imagery have found inter-individual differences in the ability to imagine whole-body movements. The majority of these studies have used subjective scales to measure imagery ability, which may be confounded by other factors related to effort. Madan and Singhal [2013. Introducing TAMI: An objective test of ability in movement imagery. Journal of Motor Behavior, 45(2), 153-166. doi: 10.1080/00222895.2013.763764 ] developed the Test of Ability in Movement Imagery (TAMI) to address these confounds by using a multiple-choice format with objectively correct responses...
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707557/the-cheek-of-a-cheater-effects-of-posing-the-left-and-right-hemiface-on-the-perception-of-trustworthiness
#12
Matia Okubo, Kenta Ishikawa, Akihiro Kobayashi
Our cognitive mechanisms are designed to detect cheaters in social exchanges. However, cheater detection can be thwarted by a posed smile, which cheaters display with greater emotional intensity than cooperators. The present study investigated the role of hemifacial asymmetries in the perception of trustworthiness using face photographs with left and right cheek poses. Participants (N = 170) observed face photographs of cheaters and cooperators in an economic game. In the photographs, models expressed happiness or anger and turned slightly to the left or right to show their left or right cheeks to the camera...
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701109/emotion-processing-in-persons-who-respond-vicariously-towards-others-in-pain-disinhibited-left-lateralized-neural-activity-for-threatening-expressions
#13
Melita J Giummarra, Govinda Poudel, P Amanda Niu, Michael E R Nicholls, Joanne Fielding, Antonio Verdejo-Garcia, Izelle Labuschagne
We investigated emotional processing in vicarious pain (VP) responders. VP responders report an explicit sensory and emotional feeling of pain when they witness another in pain, which is greater in magnitude than the empathic processing of pain in the general population. In Study 1, 31 participants completed a chimeric faces task, judging whether emotional chimera in the left, or right, visual field was more intense. VP responders took longer to judge emotionality than non-responders, and fixated more on the angry hemiface in the right visual field, whereas non-responder controls had no lateralized fixation bias...
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28670970/the-effect-of-monocular-deprivation-on-unihemispheric-sleep-in-light-and-dark-incubated-reared-domestic-chicks
#14
Angelica Quercia, Daniela Bobbo, Gian Gastone Mascetti
Unihemispheric sleep is an aspect of the cerebral lateralization of certain species of birds. During sleep, domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) show brief periods of monocular-unihemispheric sleep (Mo-Un sleep): one eye is open and the connected hemisphere is awaken while the other eye remains shut and the connected hemisphere sleeps. The time spent in Mo-Un sleep was investigated following a brief monocular deprivation (MD) in chicks hatched from eggs incubated in darkness and reared in light (D-L), incubated in light and reared in light (L-L) and incubated in darkness and reared in darkness (D-D)...
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28502226/stronger-interference-from-distractors-in-the-right-hemifield-during-visual-search
#15
Christophe Carlei, Dirk Kerzel
The orientation-bias hypothesis states that there is a bias to attend to the right visual hemifield (RVF) when there is spatial competition between stimuli in the left and right hemifield [Pollmann, S. (1996). A pop-out induced extinction-like phenomenon in neurologically intact subjects. Neuropsychologia, 34(5), 413-425. doi: 10.1016/0028-3932(95)00125-5 ]. In support of this hypothesis, stronger interference was reported for RVF distractors with contralateral targets. In contrast, previous studies using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) found stronger interference from distractors in the left visual hemifield (LVF)...
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28486882/foot-preference-underlies-bite-scar-asymmetry-in-the-gecko-ptyodactylus-guttatus
#16
Guy Sion
Scar-asymmetry may reflect brain laterality because scar location may reflect behaviour when being attacked. This has been studied in a few organisms, but never in lizards. Wild geckos (Ptyodactylus guttatus) from Israel were examined for bite-scar numbers and their lateral asymmetry. Social status was documented in the field before capture. Foot-preference, for either the right (R-footed) or left (L-footed) hind leg was determined in six trials for each gecko on adults captured in Jerusalem. I studied 48 geckos: 15 R-footed, 6 ambidextrous and 9 L-footed females; 6 R-footed, 3 ambidextrous and 9 L-footed males...
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320239/lucifer-s-legacy-the-meaning-of-asymmetry
#17
Tom McLeish
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28142328/laterality-in-sports-theories-and-applications
#18
Michael Peters
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29447065/born-criminal-differences-in-structural-functional-and-behavioural-lateralization-between-criminals-and-noncriminals
#19
Priscilla Savopoulos, Annukka K Lindell
Over 100 years ago Lombroso [(1876/2006). Criminal man. Durham: Duke University Press] proposed a biological basis for criminality. Based on inspection of criminals' skulls he theorized that an imbalance of the cerebral hemispheres was amongst 18 distinguishing features of the criminal brain. Specifically, criminals were less lateralized than noncriminals. As the advent of neuroscientific techniques makes more fine-grained inspection of differences in brain structure and function possible, we review criminals' and noncriminals' structural, functional, and behavioural lateralization to evaluate the merits of Lombroso's thesis and investigate the evidence for the biological underpinning of criminal behaviour...
February 15, 2018: Laterality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29400133/joint-assessment-of-handedness-and-footedness-through-latent-class-factor-analysis
#20
Chiara Sacco, Rocco Di Michele, Gabriele Semprini, Franco Merni, Gabriele Soffritti
Recently, some studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of two latent variable approaches in which hand preferences are analysed using either latent class methods or latent class factor (LCF) methods. The main aims of this study are: (i) to establish whether these approaches are adequate for assessing footedness, (ii) to evaluate their appropriateness when hand and foot preferences are jointly analysed, and (iii) to measure the association between handedness and footedness based on the examined latent variable models...
February 3, 2018: Laterality
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