journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551953/industry-perspective-on-alopecia-areata
#1
REVIEW
Amanda T Wagner
Recent advances in our understanding of the autoimmune basis of alopecia areata provide an opportunity to create novel effective pharmaceutical interventions. The current lack of approved therapies for alopecia areata presents a high unmet medical need, as well as a potentially attractive market opportunity. From an industry perspective, achieving clinical proof of concept (PoC) gates investments into larger approval studies. Recent investigator-initiated experience suggests that it may be possible to demonstrate rigorous PoC for new therapies in an attractive time frame with relatively fewer patients than were believed necessary in the past...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551952/development-of-uniform-protocol-for-alopecia-areata-clinical-trials
#2
REVIEW
James A Solomon
Developing a successful treatment for alopecia areata (AA), clearly has not been at the forefront of the agenda for new drug/device development among the pharmaceutical and medical device industry. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF), a patient advocacy group, initiated a plan to facilitate and drive clinical research toward finding safe and efficacious treatments for AA. As such, Alopecia Areata Uniform Protocols for clinical trials to test new treatments for AA were developed. The design of the uniform protocol is to accomplish the development of a plug-and-play template as well as to provide a framework wherein data from studies utilizing the uniform protocol can be compared through consistency of inclusions/exclusions, safety, and outcome assessment measures...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551951/prevalence-of-comorbid-conditions-and-sun-induced-skin-cancers-in-patients-with-alopecia-areata
#3
REVIEW
Rose Miller, Ruzica Z Conic, Wilma Bergfeld, Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska
Alopecia areata is a multifactorial autoimmune disease causing non-scarring hair loss. Recent genome-wide association studies have pointed to connections between alopecia areata and other autoimmune disorders. Research of clinical conditions positively and negatively associated with alopecia areata is crucial for discovering the pathological mechanisms of disease and further treatment options.
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551950/eosinophilic-esophagitis-another-atopy-related-alopecia-areata-trigger
#4
Omer Ibrahim, Wilma F Bergfeld, Melissa Piliang
Alopecia areata (AA) is associated with atopy in 10-22% of patients, twice the prevalence in the general population. Patients can present with concomitant atopic dermatitis, hay fever, asthma, and even allergies to dust mites. In many cases, severity and flares of these atopic diatheses correlate with severity of AA. Herein we present a patient with AA affected by contemporaneous eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE is a recently recognized allergic disorder, mediated by eosiniphils and histamine. It is characterized by esophageal dysfunction and intraepithelial microabscesses...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551949/alopecia-areata-registry-accomplishments
#5
EDITORIAL
Vera H Price
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551948/clinical-efficacy-of-diphenylcyclopropenone-in-alopecia-areata-retrospective-data-analysis-of-50-patients
#6
Katherine S Chiang, Natasha A Mesinkovska, Melissa P Piliang, Wilma F Bergfeld
Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) is widely considered the most effective topical immunotherapy for refractory or extensive alopecia areata (AA), but questions regarding how long to try DPCP therapy before terminating and what factors are prognostic of therapeutic success still remain unanswered. In this retrospective study of 50 AA patients, we evaluated DPCP efficacy and identified patient factors predictive of therapeutic success/failure. The median duration of DPCP treatment was 3 years, with 47% patients experiencing their first regrowth in the first 6 months of DPCP therapy, 20% between 6 months-1 year, and 8% between 1-2 years...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551947/ilk-index-and-regrowth-in-alopecia-areata
#7
Alicia M Stallings, Mara Weinstein Velez, Lori A Fiessinger, Melissa P Piliang, Natasha A Mesinkovska, Angela Kyei, Wilma F Bergfeld
There is insufficient data in the literature concerning optimal intralesional kenalog (ILK) dosing for the treatment of alopecia areata (AA). The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the utility of using the ratio of ILK received to initial Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT) score to guide ILK dosing in patients with AA. Using photographic data from patients at baseline and 4-months follow-up, hair loss in 15 patients treated with AA was retrospectively graded using the SALT scores. The ILK received/initial SALT score (ILK index) was calculated for each patient, and the mean ILK index for patients who experienced significant (≥50%) and suboptimal (<50%) hair regrowth at 4 months follow-up were compared...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551946/current-treatments-for-alopecia-areata
#8
REVIEW
Maria K Hordinsky
Selection of a therapy for a patient with alopecia areata (AA) is frequently based on the age of the patient, disease extent, perhaps disease duration, patient expectations, cost of therapy in terms of time commitment, and financial resources, as well as the results of screening laboratory studies that rule out the presence of other co-morbidities such as anemia, low iron stores, thyroid abnormalities, low vitamin D, or other autoimmune diseases. Although there is currently no cure for AA and no universally proven therapy that induces and sustains remission, many therapies are available which can be of benefit to both affected children and adults...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551945/the-need-for-a-treatment-a-patient-s-perspective
#9
Maria E Beckett
Alopecia areata is not a life-threatening disease, but it is absolutely life-altering. Alopecia areata can wreak havoc on a person's self-esteem at any age. Since the appearance of my first bald spot more than 35 years ago, millions have been diagnosed with alopecia areata and have had to endure emotional and social difficulties as a result. The scientific community has made tremendous strides in recent years to gain a better understanding of alopecia. Past, current, and planned clinical trials all provide hope to patients and their families that an effective treatment is on the horizon...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551944/the-use-of-the-immune-epitope-database-to-study-autoimmune-epitope-data-related-to-alopecia-areata
#10
REVIEW
Alessandro Sette, Sinu Paul, Kerrie Vaughan, Bjoern Peters
The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of published epitope data for infectious diseases, allergy, transplantation and autoimmunity. Herein we provide an introduction to the IEDB search interface, focusing on data related to autoimmune diseases, including alopecia areata (AA). We demonstrate how common questions related can be answered, such as how to search for specific autoantigens, epitope sequences, response types (B- and/or T-cell assays), or host, as well as how to search for epitopes of known major histocompatibility complex restriction and for data related to a specific disease...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551943/big-data-big-opportunities-and-big-challenges
#11
REVIEW
Jeffrey A Frelinger
High-throughput assays have begun to revolutionize modern biology and medicine. The advent of cheap next-generation sequencing (NGS) has made it possible to interrogate cells and human populations as never before. Although this has allowed us to investigate the genetics, gene expression, and impacts of the microbiome, there remain both practical and conceptual challenges. These include data handling, storage, and statistical analysis, as well as an inherent problem of the analysis of heterogeneous cell populations...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551942/integration-of-the-transcription-factor-regulated-and-epigenetic-mechanisms-in-the-control-of-keratinocyte-differentiation
#12
REVIEW
Vladimir A Botchkarev
The epidermal differentiation program is regulated at several levels including signaling pathways, lineage-specific transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators that establish well-coordinated process of terminal differentiation resulting in formation of the epidermal barrier. The epigenetic regulatory machinery operates at several levels including modulation of covalent DNA/histone modifications, as well as through higher-order chromatin remodeling to establish long-range topological interactions between the genes and their enhancer elements...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551941/excavating-the-genome-large-scale-mutagenesis-screening-for-the-discovery-of-new-mouse-models
#13
REVIEW
John P Sundberg, Soheil S Dadras, Kathleen A Silva, Victoria E Kennedy, Stephen A Murray, James M Denegre, Paul N Schofield, Lloyd E King, Michael V Wiles, C Herbert Pratt
Technology now exists for rapid screening of mutated laboratory mice to identify phenotypes associated with specific genetic mutations. Large repositories exist for spontaneous mutants and those induced by chemical mutagenesis, many of which have never been fully studied or comprehensively evaluated. To supplement these resources, a variety of techniques have been consolidated in an international effort to create mutations in all known protein coding genes in the mouse. With targeted embryonic stem cell lines now available for almost all protein coding genes and more recently CRISPR/Cas9 technology, large-scale efforts are underway to create further novel mutant mouse strains and to characterize their phenotypes...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551940/animal-models-for-alopecia-areata-what-and-where
#14
REVIEW
John P Sundberg, Kevin McElwee, Michael A Brehm, Lishan Su, Lloyd E King
Disease is not limited to humans. Rather, humans are but another mammal in a continuum, and as such, often share similar if not identical diseases with other mammalian species. Alopecia areata (AA) is such a disease. Natural disease occurs in humans, nonhuman primates, many domestic animals, and laboratory rodents. However, to be useful as models of human disease, affected animals need to be readily available to the research community, closely resemble the human disease, be easy to work with, and provide reproducible data...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551939/mechanisms-of-ltxa-leukotoxin-a-potent-new-anti-inflammatory-agent-for-the-treatment-of-alopecia-areata
#15
REVIEW
Scott C Kachlany
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition where activated, pro-inflammatory white blood cells (WBCs) attack the hair follicles, resulting in hair loss. Migration of these activated WBCs from the blood stream and into the follicle tissue requires interaction between the integrin, lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) on WBCs, and ICAM-1 on vascular endothelial cells. High levels of active LFA-1 are uniquely expressed on WBCs that are involved in autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. The natural biologic agent LtxA (Leukothera) preferentially targets and depletes disease activated and malignant WBCs by binding to active LFA-1...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551938/diphencyprone-treatment-of-alopecia-areata-postulated-mechanism-of-action-and-prospects-for-therapeutic-synergy-with-rna-interference
#16
Karen G Bulock, James P Cardia, Pamela A Pavco, William R Levis
Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a potent topical sensitizing agent that has been used since the late 1970s by physicians for the treatment of alopecia areata (AA), viral warts (human papillomavirus) and cutaneous metastases of melanoma. Although to date the compound is not approved as a drug by the FDA or EMA, physicians have continued to use DPCP because of its proven effects in these dermatological conditions. The use of the drug has been highly variable because of differences in compounding, and as a result, the literature reports vary widely in the concentrations used for sensitization and challenge treatment with DPCP...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551937/therapy-for-alopecia-areata-in-mice-by-stimulating-the-hair-cycle-with-parathyroid-hormone-agonists-linked-to-a-collagen-binding-domain
#17
Ranjitha Katikaneni, Andrew W Seymour, Rohan Gulati, Tulasi Ponnapakkam, Robert C Gensure
UNLABELLED: Alopecia areata is a common disorder in which autoimmune destruction of hair follicles results in patchy hair loss. Currently there is no adequate therapy, although immune modulator therapies are currently in development. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a hair cycle stimulator which shows promise in treating various forms of alopecia, although its short half-life limits its clinical use. PTH-CBD is a PTH analog which binds collagen, prolonging retention in skin. We tested effects of PTH-CBD in C3H/HeJ-engrafted mice, the animal model for alopecia areata, on hair growth and found that a significant proportion of animals had reduced hair loss (PTH-CBD: 13/21, 62% vs...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551936/toward-the-clonotype-analysis-of-alopecia-areata-specific-intralesional-human-cd8-t-lymphocytes
#18
REVIEW
Marta Bertolini, Youhei Uchida, Ralf Paus
Alopecia areata (AA) is an organ-restricted autoimmune disease that mainly affects the hair follicle (HF). Several findings support a key primary effector role of CD8+ T cells in the disease pathogenesis. Autoreactive CD8+ T cells are not only present in the characteristic peribulbar inflammatory cell infiltrate of lesional AA HFs but are also found to be infiltrating in lesional HF epithelium where they are thought to recognize major histocompatibility complex class I-presented (auto-)antigens. However, the latter still remain unidentified...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551935/overview-of-aa-and-research-progress-what-have-we-learned-and-where-are-we-headed
#19
REVIEW
David A Norris
During its 25th anniversary year, the National Alopecia Areata Foundation undertook a project to completely re-evaluate their research program and to help focus and direct future directions of alopecia areata research to better meet the goals of people with alopecia areata (AA) and the scientists working to discover mechanisms of disease and better treatments for AA. This project was embodied in four research summits in 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012, as part of the Foundation's main strategic initiative, the Alopecia Areata Treatment Development Program to accelerate progress toward a viable alopecia areata treatment...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26551934/from-targets-to-treatments-bridging-autoimmune-research-to-advance-understanding-of-alopecia-areata
#20
Dory Kranz, Abby Ellison, Jeffrey A Frelinger, Julian Mackay-Wiggan, David A Norris
Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune skin disease resulting in the loss of hair on the scalp and elsewhere on the body that affects over 146 million people worldwide at some point in their lives. Founded in 1981, the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) is a nonprofit organization that supports research to find a cure or acceptable treatment for alopecia areata, supports those with the disease, and educates the public about alopecia areata. NAAF conducts research summits every 2 years that are central to achieving the goals of a major strategic initiative, the Alopecia Areata Treatment Development Program, which are: to accelerate progress toward a safe, effective, affordable treatment or a cure for alopecia areata...
November 2015: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. Symposium Proceedings
journal
journal
32554
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"