journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30385045/like-a-hole-in-the-head-development-evolutionary-implications-and-diseases-of-the-cranial-foramina
#1
REVIEW
Imelda M McGonnell, Sophia E Akbareian
Cranial foramina are holes in the skull through which nerves and blood vessels pass to reach both deep and superficial tissues. They are often overlooked in the literature; however they are complex structures that form within the developing cranial bones during embryogenesis and then remain open throughout life, despite the bone surrounding them undergoing constant remodelling. They are invaluable in assigning phylogeny in the fossil record and their size has been used, by some, to imply function of the nerve and/or blood vessel that they contained...
October 30, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30359779/dissecting-cellular-mechanics-implications-for-aging-cancer-and-immunity
#2
REVIEW
Michael J Harris, Denis Wirtz, Pei-Hsun Wu
Cells are dynamic structures that must respond to complex physical and chemical signals from their surrounding environment. The cytoskeleton is a key mediator of a cell's response to the signals of both the extracellular matrix and other cells present in the local microenvironment and allows it to tune its own mechanical properties in response to these cues. A growing body of evidence suggests that altered cellular viscoelasticity is a strong indicator of disease state; including cancer, laminopathy (genetic disorders of the nuclear lamina), infection, and aging...
October 30, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30355526/impaired-proteostasis-in-rare-neurological-diseases
#3
REVIEW
Nerea Osinalde, Anna Duarri, Juanma Ramirez, Rosa Barrio, Guiomar Perez de Nanclares, Ugo Mayor
Rare diseases are classified as such when their prevalence is 1:2,000 or lower, but even if each of them is so infrequent, altogether more than 300 million people in the world suffer one of the ~7,000 diseases considered as rare. Over 1,200 of these disorders are known to affect the brain or other parts of our nervous system, and their symptoms can affect cognition, motor function and/or social interaction of the patients; we refer collectively to them as rare neurological disorders or RNDs. We have focused this review on RNDs known to have compromised protein homeostasis pathways...
October 21, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30347243/development-of-mesenteric-tissues
#4
REVIEW
Kevin Gerard Byrnes, Kieran McDermott, John Calvin Coffey
Mesothelial, neurovascular, lymphatic, adipose and mesenchymal tissues make up the mesentery. These tissues are pathobiologically important for numerous reasons. Collectively, they form a continuous, discrete and substantive organ. Additionally, they maintain abdominal digestive organs in position and in continuity with other systems. Furthermore, as they occupy a central position, they mediate transmission of signals between the abdominal digestive system and the remainder of the body. Despite this physiologic centrality, mesenteric tissue development has received little investigatory focus...
October 19, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30316830/anatomy-of-the-mesentery-historical-development-and-recent-advances
#5
REVIEW
Kevin Gerard Byrnes, Dara Walsh, Peter Lewton-Brain, Kieran McDermott, John Calvin Coffey
Recent appraisals of mesenteric anatomy clarify its structure and show a continuous and helical-shaped organ. This new model signifies a departure from the conventional model which described multiple, separate "mesenteries". Renaissance anatomists depicted the mesentery as a continuous structure. Events that led to replacement of a continuous with a fragmented model span several centuries. In effect, the scientific and clinical community has come full circle and back to the Renaissance model. Here we review the historical development of our understanding of the mesentery...
October 16, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30312775/fishing-for-collagen-function-about-development-regeneration-and-disease
#6
REVIEW
Sandrine Bretaud, Pauline Nauroy, Marilyne Malbouyres, Florence Ruggiero
Collagens are the most abundant vertebrate extracellular matrix proteins. They form a superfamily of 28 members that show a remarkable diversity in molecular and supramolecular organization, tissue distribution and function and mutations in collagen genes result in a wide range of inherited connective tissue diseases. In the recent years, unexpected and very diverse regulatory and mechanical collagen functions have been reported. But the structural and functional landscape of the collagen superfamily is still far from being complete...
October 16, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30336281/mesenteric-organogenesis
#7
EDITORIAL
Kevin G Byrnes, Kieran W McDermott, J Calvin Coffey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30316831/anatomy-of-the-mesentery-current-understanding-and-mechanisms-of-attachment
#8
REVIEW
Kevin Gerard Byrnes, Dara Walsh, Peter Dockery, Kieran McDermott, John Calvin Coffey
An understanding of the anatomy of the mesentery is necessary to undertake any appraisal of the literature on its development. The mesentery is the collection of tissues that maintain all abdominal digestive organs in position and connection with the rest of the body. Therefore, it is also necessary to detail the exact mechanisms that maintain the mesentery in position. We explore these mechanisms, including the supportive functions of structures such as Toldt's fascia, the peritoneal reflection, and vascular connections, in this article...
October 15, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30300692/viscoelasticity-of-multicellular-systems-from-subcellular-to-supracellular-levels
#9
EDITORIAL
Pajic-Lijakovic Ivana
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 10, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30287388/tenascins-in-cns-lesions
#10
REVIEW
Lars Roll, Andreas Faissner
The tenascin family of glycoproteins comprises four members in vertebrates, of which tenascin-C (Tnc) and tenascin-R (Tnr) are particularly important in the context of lesions in the central nervous system (CNS). Tnc is expressed in the developing CNS, before it is down-regulated and mainly restricted to the adult neural stem cell niches. It regulates numerous processes including differentiation, adhesion, migration and neurite outgrowth. These aspects are critical in the developing organism, but also after damage...
October 10, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30278225/ubiquitin-dependent-protein-degradation-at-the-endoplasmic-reticulum-and-nuclear-envelope
#11
REVIEW
Adrian B Mehrtash, Mark Hochstrasser
Numerous nascent proteins undergo folding and maturation within the luminal and membrane compartments of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Despite the presence of various factors in the ER that promote protein folding, many proteins fail to properly fold and assemble and are subsequently degraded. Regulatory proteins in the ER also undergo degradation in a way that is responsive to stimuli or the changing needs of the cell. As in most cellular compartments, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the majority of the degradation at the ER-in a process termed ER-associated degradation (ERAD)...
October 9, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30273653/perineuronal-nets-in-brain-physiology-and-disease
#12
REVIEW
Damien Testa, Alain Prochiantz, Ariel A Di Nardo
Perineuronal nets (PNNs) in the brain are condensed glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix structures with heterogeneous composition yet specific organization. They typically assemble around a subset of fast-spiking interneurons that are implicated in learning and memory. Owing to their unique structural organization, PNNs have neuroprotective capacities but also participate in signal transduction and in controlling neuronal activity and plasticity. In this review, we define PNN structure in detail and describe its various biochemical and physiological functions...
October 9, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30253239/embryology-anatomy-physiology-and-pathophysiology-of-the-peritoneum-and-the-peritoneal-vasculature
#13
REVIEW
Arnoud W Kastelein, Laura M C Vos, Kees H de Jong, Juliette O A M van Baal, Rienk Nieuwland, Cornelis J F van Noorden, Jan-Paul W R Roovers, Christianne A R Lok
The peritoneum is a large serous membrane with both epithelial and mesenchymal features, and is essential for maintaining an intra-abdominal homeostatic equilibrium. The peritoneum plays a central role in the pathogenesis of a number of disorders. Pathological processes affecting the peritoneum such as inflammation and carcinomatosis can have serious clinical consequences, but the pathophysiology of these conditions is poorly understood. Understanding peritoneal embryology, anatomy and physiology is crucial to comprehend pathophysiological mechanisms and to devise a new focus for research...
October 8, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30267805/viscoelasticity-of-single-cells-from-subcellular-to-cellular-level
#14
REVIEW
Erich Sackmann
This review deals with insights into complex cellular structures and processes obtained by measuring viscoelastic impedances of the cell envelope and the cytoplasm by colloidal bead microrheometry. I first introduce a mechanical cell model that allows us to understand their unique ability of mechanical self-stabilization by actin microtubule crosstalk. In the second part, I show how cell movements can be driven by pulsatile or propagating solitary actin gelatin waves (SAGW) that are generated on nascent adhesion domains by logistically controlled membrane recruitment of functional proteins by electrostatic-hydrophobic forces...
October 3, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30278226/the-mediator-complex-and-the-role-of-protein-protein-interactions-in-the-gene-regulation-machinery
#15
REVIEW
Emma Sierecki
At the core of gene regulation, a complex network of dynamic interactions between proteins, DNA and RNA has to be integrated in order to generate a binary biological output. Large protein complexes, called adaptors, transfer information from the transcription factors to the transcription machinery [1,2]. Here we focus on Mediator, one of the largest adaptors in humans [3]. Assembled from 30 different subunits, this system provides extraordinary illustrations for the various roles played by protein-protein interactions...
September 29, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30266687/cell-cluster-migration-connecting-experiments-with-physical-models
#16
REVIEW
Ajay Gopinathan, Nir S Gov
In multi-cellular organisms, the migration of cohesive clusters of cells containing many individual cells is a common occurrence. Examples include the migration of cells during processes such as the development of the embryo, wound healing, immune response, and the spread of cancer. The migration process depends not only on the traction forces applied by the cluster on its surroundings, in order to move, but also on the viscoelastic properties of both the surrounding matrix and the migrating cellular cluster...
September 29, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30243860/mesothelial-mesenchymal-transitions-in-embryogenesis
#17
REVIEW
Rita Carmona, Laura Ariza, Elena Cano, Manuel Jiménez-Navarro, Ramón Muñoz-Chápuli
Most animals develop coelomic cavities lined by an epithelial cell layer called the mesothelium. Embryonic mesothelial cells have the ability to transform into mesenchymal cells which populate many developing organs contributing to their connective and vascular tissues, and also to organ-specific cell types. Furthermore, embryonic mesothelium and mesothelial-derived cells produce essential signals for visceral morphogenesis. We review the most relevant literature about the mechanisms regulating the embryonic mesothelial-mesenchymal transition, the developmental fate of the mesothelial-derived cells and other functions of the embryonic mesothelium, such as its contribution to the establishment of left-right visceral asymmetries or its role in limb morphogenesis...
September 26, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30266427/molecular-regulation-of-ocular-gland-development
#18
REVIEW
Isabelle Miletich
The tear film is produced by two ocular glands, the lacrimal glands, which produce the aqueous component of this film, and the meibomian glands, which secrete the lipidic component that is key to reduce evaporation of the watery film at the surface of the eye. Embryonic development of these exocrine glands has been mostly studied in mice, which also develop Harderian glands, a third type of ocular gland whose role is still not well understood. This review provides an update on the signalling pathways, transcription factors andextracellular matrix components that have been shown to play a role in ocular gland development...
September 25, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30261318/information-flow-in-the-presence-of-cell-mixing-and-signaling-delays-during-embryonic-development
#19
REVIEW
Gabriela Petrungaro, Luis G Morelli, Koichiro Uriu
Embryonic morphogenesis is organized by an interplay between intercellular signaling and cell movements. Both intercellular signaling and cell movement involve multiple timescales. A key timescale for signaling is the time delay caused by preparation of signaling molecules and integration of received signals into cells' internal state. Movement of cells relative to their neighbors may introduce exchange of positions between cells during signaling. When cells change their relative positions in a tissue, the impact of signaling delays on intercellular signaling increases because the delayed information that cells receive may significantly differ from the present state of the tissue...
September 24, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30184476/recapitulating-kidney-development-progress-and-challenges
#20
REVIEW
Melissa H Little, Santhosh V Kumar, Thomas Forbes
Decades of research into the molecular and cellular regulation of kidney morphogenesis in rodent models, particularly the mouse, has provided both an atlas of the mammalian kidney and a roadmap for recreating kidney cell types with potential applications for the treatment of kidney disease. With advances in both our capacity to maintain nephron progenitors in culture, reprogram to kidney cell types and direct the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to kidney endpoints, renal regeneration via cellular therapy or tissue engineering may be possible...
September 20, 2018: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
journal
journal
32522
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"