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American Journal of Health Behavior

Ariel Shensa, Jaime E Sidani, Mary Amanda Dew, César G Escobar-Viera, Brian A Primack
OBJECTIVES: Individuals use social media with varying quantity, emotional, and behavioral at- tachment that may have differential associations with mental health outcomes. In this study, we sought to identify distinct patterns of social media use (SMU) and to assess associations between those patterns and depression and anxiety symptoms. METHODS: In October 2014, a nationally-representative sample of 1730 US adults ages 19 to 32 completed an online survey. Cluster analysis was used to identify patterns of SMU...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Mary Odum, Jeff M Housman, Ronald D Williams
OBJECTIVES: In this study, we examined the role of socio-demographic (race/ethnicity, sex, grade, nativity, literacy, body mass index) and individual-level (normative beliefs, knowledge, perceived barriers, food preference, self-efficacy) factors on US adolescent fruit and vegetable consumption. METHODS: We conducted hierarchical multiple regression analysis to determine the influence of factors on adolescent fruit and vegetable consumption in a nationally represen- tative sample of 795 adolescents from the National Cancer Institute's 2014 Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating (FLASHE) study...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Kellye K McGlumphy, Erika R Shaver, Tiwaloluwa A Ajibewa, Rebecca E Hasson
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine cross-sectional relationships of psychological stress, stress coping, and minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in Amer- ican-American (AA) boys and girls. METHODS: A community-based sample of 139 AA adolescents (mean age 14.7 years; SD = 1.8 years; 64.7% girls; 30% obese) from Washtenaw County, Michigan was included in this analysis. Psychological stress was assessed using the Daily Stress Inventory and the Perceived Stress Scale...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Lucy Popova, Johannes Thrul, Stanton A Glantz
OBJECTIVES: Smokers underestimate the health risks of smoking and overestimate their expected longevity. Warning labels on cigarette packs might help correct these misperceptions. METHODS: We carried out an online study with 1200 smokers (18-62 years old), randomized to 3 conditions: text warning labels, pictorial warning labels, and a control group (water bottle labels). Warning labels were based on those proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2010...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Jayne K Jeffries, Leslie Lytle, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Shelley Golden, Allison E Aiello, Laura Linnan
OBJECTIVES: To address chronic disease risk holistically from a behavioral perspective, insights are needed to refine understanding of the covariance of key health behaviors. This study aims to identify distinct typologies of young adults based on 4 modifiable risk factors of chronic disease using a latent class analysis approach, and to describe patterns of class membership based on demographic characteristics, living arrangements, and weight. METHODS: Overall, 441 young adults aged 18-35 attending community colleges in the Minnesota Twin Cities area completed a baseline questionnaire for the Choosing Healthy Options in College Environments and Settings study, a RCT...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Amy M Moore, Mary Clair-Michaud, Kathleen J Melanson, Alison Tovar
OBJECTIVES: We examined the feasibility and acceptability of a novel home-based intervention to improve the food parenting practices of low-income mothers with preschool-aged children. METHODS: Mother-child dyads (N = 15) were recruited from WIC in southern Rhode Island. A non-experimental, pretest-posttest design was used to assess changes in maternal food parenting practices. Dyads participated in 3 home-based sessions that included baseline measures and an evening meal video recording at session 1, a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention that included feedback on the evening meal video recording at session 2, and a satisfaction ques- tionnaire at session 3...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Robin S Everhart, Adrienne P Borschuk, Samantha A Miadich, Jeremy Barsell, Kristin E Heron
OBJECTIVE: In this study, we used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) delivered via smart- phones to determine how the daily experiences (comfort in neighborhood, ability to manage child's asthma, positive/negative affect) of 59 caregivers (90% African-American/black) living in an urban setting are associated with asthma symptoms in children ages 7-12 years (M = 9.56 years). METHODS: Caregivers and their children with asthma completed a baseline research ses- sion, followed by 14 days of EMA surveys completed on smartphones...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Kevin D Cassel, Drph Anh Tran, Lynn Murakami-Akatsuka, Jodi Tanabe-Hanzawa, Terrilea Burnett, Christopher Lum
OBJECTIVE: We tested the effectiveness of a school-based skin cancer prevention intervention entitled "SunSafe in the Middle School Years" adapted for multiethnic high school students. METHODS: In Hawai'i, 208 10th graders (51.6% Asian, 30.4% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 8.4% white, 3.5% Hispanic, 2.7% black) participated. Changes in sun protection knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported behaviors were measured using a standardized 18-item survey...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Jessica A Kulak, Michelle Bover T Manderski, Mark J Travers, Cristine D Delnevo, Mary Hrywna, Maansi Bansal-Travers, Gregory G Homish, Gary A Giovino
OBJECTIVES: In this study, the aim was to document trends of ever, past 30-day, and frequent (use on > 10 days/month) hookah use among New Jersey (NJ) high school students. METHODS: Data were analyzed from the 2008-2014 waves of the NJ Youth Tobacco Survey, a biennial survey of public high school students in grades 9-12 with a mean age of 15 years. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed trends and correlates of hookah use. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the use of cigarettes, electronic cigarettes, and other tobacco products (including cigars, smokeless tobacco, and bidis)...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Brittany S Overstreet, Kelley Strohacker
OBJECTIVE: We examined the relationship between variability in self-regulated exercise intensity and overall intensity during acute exercise. METHODS: Overall, 32 participants (age; 20±4y, body mass index (BMI) 24.1±3.6 kg/m2) completed a 30-minute self-regulated treadmill exercise bout. Participants were blinded to treadmill settings and adjusted speed and incline every 5-minutes as desired. RESULTS: Variability in exercise intensity (metabolic equivalent standard deviation (METSD)) was positively correlated with (r = ...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Sheng Zhang, Ruopeng An
OBJECTIVES: We examined the impact of ambient air pollution on television use among residents in Shanghai, China. METHODS: Device-measured daily average duration of television use from January 2014 to December 2016 was obtained from a random sample of 300 households, and was matched to air pollution and weather data. We used an autoregressive moving-average model to estimate the association between air quality index (AQI) and television use. RESULTS: There was a negative non-linear relationship between air pollution level and television use...
March 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Yufei Cui, Wenbo Zhang, Qiang Gong, Yanbo Chen, Shulei Chen, Ziqiang Wu
OBJECTIVE: Although several studies report a relationship between breakfast consumption and physical fitness, results are inconsistent and lack evidence in young adults. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between frequency of breakfast consumption and physical fitness among college students. METHODS: This cross-sectional study investigated 10,125 Chinese college students (6251 male, 3874 female participants) who underwent physical examinations in 2015...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Sonali Rajan, Kelly V Ruggles, Honoria Guarino, Pedro Mateu-Gelabert
OBJECTIVES: We identified the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use and its relationship to heroin and injection drug use in 4 nationally representative samples of adolescents. METHODS: We used the most recent data (2009-2015) from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (Ntotal= 61,132). Prevalence rates and 95% confidence intervals for prescription drug misuse, heroin use, and injection drug use were calculated across time points, sex, and race/ethnicity subgroups...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Jiwoo Lee, Martha Y Kubik, Jayne A Fulkerson
OBJECTIVES: The American Academy of Pediatrics advises having no media devices in children's bedrooms. We examined the link between media devices in parents' and children's bedrooms and children's media use. METHODS: Ninety parent-child dyads participated in a community- based healthy weight management study targeting 8-to-12-year-olds with body mass index (BMI)-for-age ≥75th percentile. Parents and children reported the number of media devices in their bedrooms and hours spent using media devices on weekdays and weekend days...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Sasha A Fleary, Claudio R Nigg, Karen M Freund
OBJECTIVES: Due to growing health disparities, federal and philanthropic agencies have empha-sized reducing health disparities in their preventive health efforts. This study determined the status of disparities in health behaviors in the last 13 years in the United States. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Systems in odd years (2003-2015). Health behaviors were dichotomized to reflect met fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and physical activity (PA) recommendations, non-cigarette smoking, non-heavy drinking, and non-binge drinking...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Jiyeon So, Lucy Popova
OBJECTIVES: Message fatigue, a phenomenon of being tired of repeated exposure to messages promoting the same health behavior, may reduce the effectiveness of anti-tobacco messages, such as warning labels. As an initial step towards understanding the phenomenon, we examined predictors of anti-tobacco message fatigue. METHODS: An online study (N = 1838) involving a non-probability sample of nonsmokers and smokers in the United States assessed anti-tobacco message fatigue and individual-level factors including demographic variables and smoking status...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Hui P Liew
OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to examine how older adults rate and identify the importance of attributes associated with healthcare seeking and utilization (eg, affordability, type of facility, and accessibility) in the United States. METHODS: The empirical work of this cross-sectional study is based on the 2014 Health and Retirement Study. Conjoint analysis and cluster analysis are used to assess the objective. RESULTS: There is a pressing need for sound policies that seek to reduce the cost of treatment and consultation and to improve the accessibility of care facility for older adults even though satisfaction pertaining to these attributes (ie, affordability, type of facility, and accessibility) differs across clusters...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Isabelle Savoye, Iris Cervenka, Yahya Mahamat-Saleh, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Marina Kvaskoff
OBJECTIVES: In this study, we attempt to describe the profile of sunbed users among cancer-free French women. METHODS: E3N is a prospective cohort including 98,995 French women aged 40- 65 years in 1990. In 2008, a specific UV questionnaire was sent to all reported skin cancer cases and 3 controls per case, matched on age, county of birth, and education. We used logistic regression models adjusted for pigmentary traits. RESULTS: Compared with non-users, ever-users of sunbeds were younger (ptrend < ...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Sirpa Soini, Pertti Mustajoki, Johan G Eriksson
OBJECTIVES: The main aims of this study were to assess motivational factors for weight loss, and support and difficulties during the weight loss and weight maintenance phase. METHODS: This study was based upon findings from the Finnish Weight Control Registry (FWCR), including 158 formerly obese persons, who lost at least 10% of their initial weight and maintained it for at least 2 years. Data have been collected through electronic forms. RESULTS: The 2 most commonly reported motivational factors for weight loss were health- and appearance-related factors...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
Daniel L Hall, Inga T Lennes, Alaina Carr, Justin R Eusebio, Gloria Y Yeh, Elyse R Park
OBJECTIVES: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, yet lung screening remains underutilized. Lung cancer screening uncertainty (LCSU), including referral clarity and the perceived accuracy of screening, may hinder utilization and represent an unmet psychosocial need. This study sought to identify correlates of LCSU among lung screening patients. METHODS: Current and former smokers (N = 169) completed questionnaires assessing LCSU, sociodemographic variables, objective and subjective numeracy, stress, and anxiety, as part of a cross-sectional study of lung screening patients at an academic hospital...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Health Behavior
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