journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080097/correction-to-elliott-and-leach-2016
#1
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "You must be lying because I don't understand you: Language proficiency and lie detection" by Elizabeth Elliott and Amy-May Leach (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 2016[Dec], Vol 22[4], 488-499). (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-59419-006.) We examined the impact of interviewees' language proficiencies on observers' lie detection performance. Observers (N = 132) were randomly assigned to make deception judgments about interviewees (N = 56) from Four proficiency groups (i...
January 12, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045279/mind-the-gap-automated-concept-map-feedback-supports-students-in-writing-cohesive-explanations
#2
Andreas Lachner, Christian Burkhart, Matthias Nückles
Many students are challenged with the demand of writing cohesive explanations. To support students in writing cohesive explanations, we developed a computer-based feedback tool that visualizes cohesion deficits of students' explanations in a concept map. We conducted three studies to investigate the effectiveness of such feedback as well as the underlying cognitive processes. In Study 1, we found that the concept map helped students identify potential cohesion gaps in their drafts and plan remedial revisions...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045278/corporate-personhood-lay-perceptions-and-ethical-consequences
#3
Arthur S Jago, Kristin Laurin
Modern conceptions of corporate personhood have spurred considerable debate about the rights that society should afford business organizations. Across eight experiments, we compare lay perceptions of how corporations and people use rights, and also explore the with consequences of these judgments. We find that people believe corporations, compared to humans, are similarly likely to use rights in protective ways that prevent harm but more likely to use rights in nonprotective ways that appear independent from-or even create-harm (Experiments 1a through 1c and Experiment 2)...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045277/discriminating-between-correct-and-incorrect-eyewitness-identifications-the-use-of-appropriate-cues
#4
Kristina S Kaminski, Siegfried L Sporer
To explain fact finders' judgment accuracy when evaluating the accuracy of an identification decision we applied the Brunswikian lens model. Guided by this model we examined (a) which cues observers use to evaluate an identification decision and how they interpret them ("subjective utilities"); and (b) if these cues as perceived by observers are indeed related to identification accuracy ("ecological validities"). Ninety-six participant-observers were presented with 48 videotaped positive identification decisions...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28045276/evaluating-the-feature-comparison-strategy-for-forensic-face-identification
#5
Alice Towler, David White, Richard I Kemp
Face recognition is thought to rely on representations that encode holistic properties. Paradoxically, professional forensic examiners who identify unfamiliar faces by comparing facial images are trained to adopt a feature-by-feature comparison strategy. Here we tested the effectiveness of this strategy by asking participants to rate facial feature similarity prior to making same/different identity decisions to pairs of face images. Experiment 1 provided preliminary evidence that rating feature similarity improves unfamiliar face matching accuracy in novice participants...
January 2, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936831/correction-to-adams-et-al-2016
#6
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "How Readers Understand Causal and Correlational Expressions Used in News Headlines" by Rachel C. Adams, Petroc Sumner, Solveiga Vivian-Griffiths, Andrew Williams, Jacky Boivin, Christopher D. Chambers and Lewis Bott (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Advanced Online Publication, Nov 3, 2016, np). The fourth author, Amy Barrington, the fourth author was inadvertently omitted from the advance online version. Also, the second paragraph of the author note should have included the following: "Amy Barrington contributed to the design and data collection for Experiments 2 and 3...
December 12, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27808530/how-readers-understand-causal-and-correlational-expressions-used-in-news-headlines
#7
Rachel C Adams, Petroc Sumner, Solveiga Vivian-Griffiths, Amy Barrington, Andrew Williams, Jacky Boivin, Christopher D Chambers, Lewis Bott
[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported online in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied on Dec 12 2016 (see record 2016-59631-001). The fourth author, Amy Barrington, the fourth author was inadvertently omitted from the advance online version. Also, the second paragraph of the author note should have included the following: "Amy Barrington contributed to the design and data collection for Experiments 2 and 3. We thank the following undergraduate students for contributions to Experiment 1 and pilot work leading up to the project: Laura Benjamin, Cecily Donnelly, Cameron Dunlop, Rebecca Emerson, Rose Fisher, Laura Jones, Olivia Manship, Hannah McCarthy, Naomi Scott, Eliza Walwyn-Jones, Leanne Whelan, and Joe Wilton...
November 3, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936859/extracting-critical-information-from-group-members-partial-knowledge-using-the-searching-concealed-information-test
#8
Eitan Elaad
The Concealed Information Test (CIT) is a psychophysiological method designed to detect information that an individual cannot or does not wish to reveal. The present study used a version of the CIT, the Searching Concealed Information Test (SCIT), to extract information from partial information that participants possessed on a planned jailbreak. In the first experiment, 52 undergraduate students were randomly, but not equally, allocated into 15 different clusters of partial knowledge. In each, participants possessed knowledge about 2 of 6 critical items...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936858/you-must-be-lying-because-i-don-t-understand-you-language-proficiency-and-lie-detection
#9
Elizabeth Elliott, Amy-May Leach
We examined the impact of interviewees' language proficiencies on observers' lie detection performance. Observers (N = 132) were randomly assigned to make deception judgments about interviewees (N = 56) from Four proficiency groups (i.e., native, advanced, intermediate, and beginner English speakers). Discrimination between lie- and truth-tellers was poorest when observers judged beginner English speakers compared to interviewees from any other proficiency group. Observers were also less likely to exhibit a truth-bias toward nonnative than native English speakers...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936857/in-the-same-group-but-moving-in-different-directions-coordination-effects-in-tasks-with-simultaneous-intellective-and-judgmental-performance-criteria
#10
Bryan L Bonner, Andrew T Soderberg, Alexander C Romney
Cooperative work can seldom be meaningfully reduced to a single performance criterion. However, there is little theory regarding how groups address tasks with multiple success criteria. Generalizing from the theory of task demonstrability we offer a foundation for understanding group performance on multifaceted tasks that includes a focus on subtask performance, overall performance, and the subjective experience of group members. We predict and find that the composition of groups with respect to member priorities (i...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936856/contextual-information-and-perceptual-cognitive-expertise-in-a-dynamic-temporally-constrained-task
#11
Colm P Murphy, Robin C Jackson, Karl Cooke, André Roca, Nicolas Benguigui, A Mark Williams
Skilled performers extract and process postural information from an opponent during anticipation more effectively than their less-skilled counterparts. In contrast, the role and importance of contextual information in anticipation has received only minimal attention. We evaluate the importance of contextual information in anticipation and examine the underlying perceptual-cognitive processes. We present skilled and less-skilled tennis players with normal video or animated footage of the same rallies. In the animated condition, sequences were created using player movement and ball trajectory data, and postural information from the players was removed, constraining participants to anticipate based on contextual information alone...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936855/evaluating-probe-techniques-and-a-situated-theory-of-situation-awareness
#12
Dan Chiappe, Corey A Morgan, Joshua Kraut, Jason Ziccardi, Lindsay Sturre, Thomas Z Strybel, Kim-Phuong L Vu
Probe techniques for measuring situation awareness (SA) vary in whether scenarios are paused and displays visible while questions are presented. We examined which technique is least intrusive on workload and performance in air traffic control, and which is most sensitive at capturing differences in SA when automation varies. We also tested predictions from the situated SA theory, which holds that operators offload specific and low-priority information onto displays to limit internal processing. To accomplish these goals, Experiments 1 and 2 manipulated whether radar displays were visible and scenarios paused during queries...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936854/interword-and-interletter-spacing-effects-during-reading-revisited-interactions-with-word-and-font-characteristics
#13
Timothy J Slattery, Mark Yates, Bernhard Angele
Despite the large number of eye movement studies conducted over the past 30+ years, relatively few have examined the influence that font characteristics have on reading. However, there has been renewed interest in 1 particular font characteristic, letter spacing, which has both theoretical (visual word recognition) and applied (font design) importance. Recently published results that letter spacing has a bigger impact on the reading performance of dyslexic children have perhaps garnered the most attention (Zorzi et al...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27936853/improving-metacomprehension-accuracy-in-an-undergraduate-course-context
#14
Jennifer Wiley, Thomas D Griffin, Allison J Jaeger, Andrew F Jarosz, Patrick J Cushen, Keith W Thiede
Students tend to have poor metacomprehension when learning from text, meaning they are not able to distinguish between what they have understood well and what they have not. Although there are a good number of studies that have explored comprehension monitoring accuracy in laboratory experiments, fewer studies have explored this in authentic course contexts. This study investigated the effect of an instructional condition that encouraged comprehension-test-expectancy and self-explanation during study on metacomprehension accuracy in the context of an undergraduate course in research methods...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732032/where-are-you-the-effect-of-uncertainty-and-its-visual-representation-on-location-judgments-in-gps-like-displays
#15
Mary Hegarty, Alinda Friedman, Alexander P Boone, Trevor J Barrett
Two experiments revealed how nonexperts interpret visualizations of positional uncertainty on GPS-like displays and how the visual representation of uncertainty affects their judgments. Participants were shown maps with representations of their current location; locational uncertainty was visualized as either a circle (confidence interval) or a faded glyph (indicating the probability density function directly). When shown a single circle or faded glyph, participants assumed they were located at the center of the uncertain region...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27643405/the-short-lived-benefits-of-variety-seeking-among-the-chronically-indecisive
#16
Hyewook Genevieve Jeong, Kate Christensen, Aimee Drolet
This research investigated the influence of trait indecisiveness on variety-seeking behavior. Study 1 revealed that chronic indecisiveness was associated with increased variety-seeking behavior. Study 2A showed that the incidence of not choosing to make a choice was much lower among chronically indecisive people when a variety-pack option was available, and Study 2B showed that chronically indecisive people chose the variety pack even if it included their least preferred option. Study 3 demonstrated that chronically indecisive people contended with the negative emotion they experienced during choice making by choosing a mix of options...
December 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27608069/face-off-a-new-identification-procedure-for-child-eyewitnesses
#17
Heather L Price, Ryan J Fitzgerald
In 2 experiments, we introduce a new "face-off" procedure for child eyewitness identifications. The new procedure, which is premised on reducing the stimulus set size, was compared with the showup and simultaneous procedures in Experiment 1 and with modified versions of the simultaneous and elimination procedures in Experiment 2. Several benefits of the face-off procedure were observed: it was significantly more diagnostic than the showup procedure; it led to significantly more correct rejections of target-absent lineups than the simultaneous procedures in both experiments, and it led to greater information gain than the modified elimination and simultaneous procedures...
September 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27608068/the-effects-of-curiosity-evoking-events-on-activity-enjoyment
#18
Elif Isikman, Deborah J MacInnis, Gülden Ülkümen, Lisa A Cavanaugh
Whereas prior literature has studied the positive effects of curiosity-evoking events that are integral to focal activities, we explore whether and how a curiosity-evoking event that is incidental to a focal activity induces negative outcomes for enjoyment. Four experiments and 1 field study demonstrate that curiosity about an event that is incidental to an activity in which individuals are engaged, significantly affects enjoyment of a concurrent activity. The reason why is that curiosity diverts attention away from the concurrent activity and focuses attention on the curiosity-evoking event...
September 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27608067/reducing-prospective-memory-error-and-costs-in-simulated-air-traffic-control-external-aids-extending-practice-and-removing-perceived-memory-requirements
#19
Shayne Loft, Melissa Chapman, Rebekah E Smith
In air traffic control (ATC), forgetting to perform deferred actions-prospective memory (PM) errors-can have severe consequences. PM demands can also interfere with ongoing tasks (costs). We examined the extent to which PM errors and costs were reduced in simulated ATC by providing extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. Participants accepted/handed-off aircraft and detected conflicts...
September 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27505049/effects-of-cues-in-a-binary-categorization-task-on-dual-task-performance-mental-workload-and-effort
#20
Assaf Botzer, Joachim Meyer, Yisrael Parmet
Binary cues help operators perform binary categorization tasks, such as monitoring for system failures. They may also allow them to attend to other tasks they concurrently perform. If the time saved by using cues is allocated to other concurrent tasks, users' overall effort may remain unchanged. In 2 experiments, participants performed a simulated quality control task, together with a tracking task. In half the experimental blocks cues were available, and participants could use them in their decisions about the quality of products (intact or faulty)...
September 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Applied
journal
journal
32265
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"