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Nursing Inquiry

Kathleen T Galvin, Claire Sloan, Fiona Cowdell, Caroline Ellis-Hill, Carole Pound, Roger Watson, Steven Ersser, Sheila Brooks
There is limited consensus about what constitutes humanly sensitive care, or how it can be sustained in care settings. A new humanised care assessment tool may point to caring practices that are up to the task of meeting persons as humans within busy healthcare environments. This paper describes qualitative development of a tool that is conceptually sensitive to human dimensions of care informed by a life-world philosophical orientation. Items were generated to reflect eight theoretical dimensions that constitute what makes care feel humanly focused...
March 4, 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Ann-Marie Urban
The aim of this article is to elucidate how nurses are positioned in Canadian news stories regarding their salaries. While the image of nursing in mass media has been widely studied, few studies explore how nurses are constructed in news stories. Drawing on ideas from institutional ethnography together with discourse analysis, this discussion highlights public textual discourses about nurses' salaries in Canadian news stories. The media discourse was found to distort the issues by focusing attention on nurses...
February 22, 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Hanne Aagaard, Elisabeth O C Hall, Mette S Ludvigsen, Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt, Liv Fegran
Transfers of critically ill neonates are frequent phenomena. Even though parents' participation is regarded as crucial in neonatal care, a transfer often means that parents and neonates are separated. A systematic review of the parents' experiences of neonatal transfer is lacking. This paper describes a meta-study addressing qualitative research about parents' experiences of neonatal transfer. Through deconstruction and reflections of theories, methods, and empirical data, the aim was to achieve a deeper understanding of theoretical, empirical, contextual, historical, and methodological issues of qualitative studies concerning parents' experiences of neonatal transfer over the course of this meta-study (2000-2017)...
February 15, 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Lynere Wilson, Marie Crowe, Anne Scott, Cameron Lacey
The promotion of the self-managing capacities of people has become a marker of contemporary mental health practice, yet self-management remains a largely uncontested construct in mental health settings. This discourse analysis based upon the work of Foucault investigates self-management practices for bipolar disorder and their action upon how a person with bipolar disorder comes to think of who they are and how they should live. Using Foucault's framework for exploring the ethical self and transcripts of interviews with people living with bipolar disorder, this discourse analysis finds that the discursive practices of self-management for bipolar disorder are prescribing a restricted regime for living based upon the quintessential neo-liberal subject using practices that are focused upon managing an unreliable and problematic self...
January 23, 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Kristen R Haase, Roanne T Thomas, Wendy Gifford, Lorraine F Holtslander
People diagnosed with cancer typically want information from their doctor or nurse. However, many individuals now turn to the Internet to tackle unmet information needs and to complement healthcare professional information. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore the content of commonly searched cancer websites from a critical nursing perspective, as this information is accessible, and allows patients to address their information needs in ways that healthcare professionals cannot. This qualitative examination of websites is informed by Carper's fundamental patterns of knowing and complemented with the critical view to technology espoused by the philosophy of technology...
January 12, 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Olive Fast, Janet Rankin
In this paper, we examine the practicalities of nurse managers' work. We expose how managers' commitments to transformational leadership are undermined by the rationing practices and informatics of hospital reform underpinned by the ideas of new public management. Using institutional ethnography, we gathered data in a Canadian hospital. We began by interviewing and observing frontline leaders, nurse managers, and expanded our inquiry to include interviews with other nurses, staffing clerks, and administrators whose work intersected with that of nurse managers...
December 25, 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Sally Thorne
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Sarah Stahlke Wall
Since at least the 1970s in Canada, there have been calls for health system reforms based on innovative roles and expanded scopes of practice for nurses. Professional regulatory organizations, through legislation, define the standards and parameters of professional nursing practice. Nursing regulators emphasize public protection over the advancement of nursing; regulatory processes and decisions tend to be conservative and risk-averse. This study explored the impact that regulatory processes have on innovation in nursing roles...
January 2018: Nursing Inquiry
Kristin Bjornsdottir
In recent years, much attention has been paid to how older people living at home can remain independent and manage their illness themselves, while less attention has been given to those who have become frail and need assistance with challenges of everyday life. In this article, I drew on Latimer's formulation of care for frail older people as relational and world-making and on Foucault's work related to the care of the self in developing an understanding of how frail older persons manage to live well at home in the final years of their lives...
December 13, 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Jordana Salma, Norah Keating, Linda Ogilvie, Kathleen F Hunter
The increase in ethnically and linguistically diverse older adults in Canada necessitates attention to their experiences and needs for healthy ageing. Arab immigrant women often report challenges in maintaining health, but little is known about their ageing experiences. This interpretive descriptive study uses a transnational life course framework to understand Arab Muslim immigrant women's experiences of engaging in health-promoting practices as they age in Canada. Women's stories highlight social dimensions of health such social connectedness, social roles and social support that are constructed and maintained within different migration contexts across the life course...
December 12, 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Marie Hutchinson, Debra Jackson, Stacey Wilson
In recent decades, debate on the quality and safety of healthcare has been dominated by a measure and manage administrative rationality. More recently, this rationality has been overlaid by ideas from human factors, ergonomics and systems engineering. Little critical attention has been given in the nursing literature to how risk of harm is understood and actioned, or how patients can be subjectified and marginalised through these discourses. The problem of assuring safety for particular patient groups, and the dominance of technical forms of rationality, has seen the word 'unavoidable' used in connection with intractable forms of patient harm...
October 4, 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Sally Thorne
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Soheila Jafari-Mianaei, Nasrollah Alimohammadi, Amir-Hossein Banki-Poorfard, Marzieh Hasanpour
All schools of thought believe that infancy is crucial to the formation and development of the human character. Nevertheless, a search of literature revealed the lack of a clear definition of the concept of 'infancy care based on an Islamic perspective' in nursing texts. As the lack of a clear definition of a concept conveys the inapplicability of that concept to its relevant field and community, this study was conducted to explore and determine the characteristic features of the concept of infancy care based on the perspective of Islam...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Olga Rodrigo, Jordi Caïs, Cristina Monforte-Royo
When, in 1977, nurse education in Spain was transferred to universities a more patient-centred, the Anglo-American philosophy of care was introduced into a context in which nurses had traditionally prioritised their technical skills. This paper examines the characteristics of the nurse's professional role in Spain, where the model of nursing practice has historically placed them in a position akin to that of physician assistants. The study design was qualitative and used the method of analytic induction. Participants were selected by means of theoretical sampling and then underwent in-depth interviews...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Anne Bendix Andersen, Kirsten Frederiksen, Raymond Kolbaek, Kirsten Beedholm
It is widely recognised that the delivery of services across health-care sectors faces multiple challenges related to incoherence in patient pathways. There are multiple reasons for this incoherence, which are often dealt with through national legislation and policy-making. This paper discusses policies as powerful actors and explores how effects of a concrete policy are adapted for intersectorial collaboration in Danish health-care. The paper is based on a critical discourse analysis of a central policy document in Danish health-care known as the 'Health Agreements'...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Sheri Tesseyman, Christine Hallett, Jane Brooks
This historical study aims to refine understanding of the nature of nursing work. The study focuses on the 1880 crisis at Guy's Hospital in London to examine the nature and meaning of nursing work, particularly the concept of nursing work as many 'little things.' In this paper, an examination of Margaret Lonsdale's writing offers an original contribution to our understanding of the ways in which nursing work differs from medical practice. In this way, we use the late-nineteenth-century controversy at Guy's Hospital as a prism through which to examine the contested nature of nursing work...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Allie Slemon, Emily Jenkins, Vicky Bungay
The discourse of safety has informed the care of individuals with mental illness through institutionalization and into modern psychiatric nursing practices. Confinement arose from safety: out of both societal stigma and fear for public safety, as well as benevolently paternalistic aims to protect individuals from self-harm. In this paper, we argue that within current psychiatric inpatient environments, safety is maintained as the predominant value, and risk management is the cornerstone of nursing care. Practices that accord with this value are legitimized and perpetuated through the safety discourse, despite evidence refuting their efficacy, and patient perspectives demonstrating harm...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Kim M Mitchell
Academic voice is an oft-discussed, yet variably defined concept, and confusion exists over its meaning, evaluation, and interpretation. This paper will explore perspectives on academic voice and counterarguments to the positivist origins of objectivity in academic writing. While many epistemological and methodological perspectives exist, the feminist literature on voice is explored here as the contrary position. From the feminist perspective, voice is a socially constructed concept that cannot be separated from the experiences, emotions, and identity of the writer and, thus, constitutes a reflection of an author's way of knowing...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Rusla Anne Springer, Michael Edward Clinton
Drawing on a comprehensive, pan-national analysis of the corporatization of Canadian universities, as well as the notions of 'parrhesiastic' mentorship and practice, the authors examine the effects of the corporatized university, its implications for graduate nursing education and nursing's relative silence on the subject. With the preponderance of business interests, the increasing dependence of universities on industry funding, cults of efficiency, research intensivity, and the pursuit of profit so prevalent in today's corporatized university, we argue that philosophical presuppositions so crucial to critical teaching, research, and reflection on nursing as a discipline are troublingly losing ground...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
Pcb Lalleman, Gac Smid, J Dikken, M D Lagerwey, M J Schuurmans
Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A combination of time-use analysis and ethnographic work was used to disclose their contribution to patient-centred care at a micro level. Sixteen nurse managers were shadowed for over 560 hours in four hospitals. Some nurse middle managers seldom contribute to patient-centred care...
October 2017: Nursing Inquiry
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