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Wilderness & Environmental Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318991/bleeding-control-using-hemostatic-dressings-lessons-learned
#1
REVIEW
Brad L Bennett
Based on lessons learned, many military battlefield trauma advances ultimately transition to enhance civilian trauma care. However, even with major strides to enhance battlefield hemorrhage control, it is unclear how effectively these techniques and products are being translated to civilian trauma. The purpose of this brief review is to present the evidence of current hemostatic product effectiveness, determine the evidence for transitioning of this technology to prehospital civilian application, and provide recommendations about potential use in the wilderness/austere setting...
March 16, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318990/junctional-hemorrhage-control-for-tactical-combat-casualty-care
#2
REVIEW
Russ S Kotwal, Frank K Butler
During historic, as well as more recent, conflicts, most combat casualties who die from their injuries do so in the prehospital setting. Although many of the injuries incurred by these casualties are nonsurvivable, a number of injuries are still potentially survivable. Of those injuries that are potentially survivable, the majority are truncal, junctional, and extremity hemorrhage. Novel and effective approaches directed toward prehospital hemorrhage control have emerged in recent years, some of which can prove useful in the management of junctional hemorrhage whether in a military or civilian setting...
March 16, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318989/first-report-of-using-portable-unmanned-aircraft-systems-drones-for-search-and-rescue
#3
Christopher Van Tilburg
Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), colloquially called drones, are used commonly for military, government, and civilian purposes, including both commercial and consumer applications. During a search and rescue mission in Oregon, a UAS was used to confirm a fatality in a slot canyon; this eliminated the need for a dangerous rappel at night by rescue personnel. A second search mission in Oregon used several UAS to clear terrain. This allowed search of areas that were not accessible or were difficult to clear by ground personnel...
March 16, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284484/tactical-combat-casualty-care-transitioning-battlefield-lessons-learned-to-other-austere-environments
#4
EDITORIAL
Brad Bennett, Ian Wedmore, Frank Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 8, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284483/tactical-combat-casualty-care-beginnings
#5
REVIEW
Frank K Butler
Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a set of evidence-based, best-practice prehospital trauma care guidelines customized for use on the battlefield. The origins of TCCC were nontraditional. The TCCC program began as a Naval Special Warfare biomedical research effort launched after the realization that extremity hemorrhage, a leading cause of preventable death on the battlefield, was not being treated with a readily available and highly effective intervention: the tourniquet. This insight prompted a systematic reevaluation of all aspects of battlefield trauma care that was conducted from 1993 to 1996 as a joint effort by special operations medical personnel and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...
March 8, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279652/the-transition-to-the-committee-on-tactical-combat-casualty-care
#6
REVIEW
Stephen D Giebner
The original Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines were published in a special supplement to Military Medicine in 1996 as the terminal deliverable of a 2-year development project funded by the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). Two years later, the USSOCOM Biomedical Initiatives Steering Committee (BISC) promulgated its Task Statement 5-98, in which it called for the formation of a panel of subject matter experts to update the TCCC guidelines. This article discusses the formation of the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) and the changes to the original guidelines that constituted the first update...
March 6, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28162912/turning-submissions-into-a-journal
#7
EDITORIAL
Neal W Pollock
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28161320/in-reply-to-drs-sikri-bhattachar-and-thapa
#8
LETTER
James S Lawrence, Stephen A Reid
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 1, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28153379/2016-wilderness-environmental-medicine-peer-reviewers
#9
EDITORIAL
Alicia Byrne
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 30, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089338/lymphangitis-from-scolopendra-heros-envenomation-the-texas-redheaded-centipede
#10
Shannon E Essler, Maneesha Julakanti, Andrew L Juergens
Envenomation by Scolopendra heros, the Texas redheaded centipede, can present variably. Although transient pain and erythema are often treated conservatively, complications may include cellulitis, necrosis, myocardial infarction, and rhabdomyolysis. We present a case of an elderly man who came to the emergency department with lymphangitis and dermatitis secondary to a centipede sting that awoke him from sleep. It is important to recognize the potential of centipede envenomation to have severe local and systemic manifestations...
January 11, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087324/on-rope-looking-up
#11
Joshua E Lane
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 10, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087323/severe-hemorrhagic-syndrome-after-lonomia-caterpillar-envenomation-in-the-western-brazilian-amazon-how-many-more-cases-are-there
#12
João Hugo A Santos, Sâmella S Oliveira, Eliane C Alves, Iran Mendonça-da-Silva, Jacqueline A G Sachett, Antonio Tavares, Luiz Carlos Ferreira, Hui Wen Fan, Marcus V G Lacerda, Wuelton M Monteiro
Contact with Lonomia caterpillars can cause a hemorrhagic syndrome. In Brazil, Lonomia obliqua and Lonomia achelous are known to cause this venom-induced disease. In the Brazilian Amazon, descriptions of this kind of envenomation are scarce. Herein, we report a severe hemorrhagic syndrome caused by Lonomia envenomation in the Amazonas state, Western Brazilian Amazon. The patient showed signs of hemorrhage lasting 8 days and required Lonomia antivenom administration, which resulted in resolution of hemorrhagic syndrome...
January 10, 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257715/an-assessment-of-diarrhea-among-long-distance-backpackers-in-the-sierra-nevada
#13
Derek J Meyer, Amber Costantino, Susanne Spano
INTRODUCTION: Diarrhea is a common problem among long-distance backpackers, ranging in overall incidence from 11-56% as reported by previous studies on the Appalachian Trail and Long Trail. Differences in age, sex, and regularity of standard backcountry hygiene recommendations and practices have been shown to significantly affect the incidence of diarrhea. No study to date has investigated these trends among long-distance backpackers on the John Muir Trail (JMT) in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California...
March 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257714/wilderness-medical-society-practice-guidelines-for-prevention-and-management-of-avalanche-and-nonavalanche-snow-burial-accidents
#14
Christopher Van Tilburg, Colin K Grissom, Ken Zafren, Scott McIntosh, Martin I Radwin, Peter Paal, Pascal Haegeli, William Will R Smith, Albert R Wheeler, David Weber, Bruce Tremper, Hermann Brugger
To provide guidance to clinicians and avalanche professionals about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, rescue, and medical management of avalanche and nonavalanche snow burial victims. Recommendations are graded on the basis of quality of supporting evidence according to the classification scheme of the American College of Chest Physicians.
March 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257713/hmox1-promoter-microsatellite-polymorphism-is-not-associated-with-high-altitude-pulmonary-edema-in-han-chinese
#15
Xue-Feng Cao, Lan Ma, Shang Ma, Jin Xu, Ri-Li Ge
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between microsatellite polymorphism in the Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene promoter and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in Han Chinese. METHODS: Eighty-three construction workers who developed HAPE 2 to 7 days after arrival at Yushu (3800 m) in Qinghai, China, and 145 matched healthy subjects were included in this study. The amplification and labeling of the polymerase chain reaction products for capillary electrophoresis were performed to identify HMOX1 genotype frequency...
March 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257712/the-effects-of-a-36-hour-mixed-task-ultraendurance-race-on-mucosal-immunity-markers-and-pulmonary-function
#16
David Bellar, Kellie A Murphy, Ritvik Aithal, Greggory R Davis, Tim Piper
OBJECTIVE: The present study was conducted to assess the changes in mucosal immunity and pulmonary function among participants in a 36-hour mixed task ultraendurance race. METHODS: Thirteen of the 20 race participants volunteered for the investigation (age 34±5 y). The event consisted of a mixture of aerobic, strong man, and military-style exercise. Participants had a pulmonary function test and gave a finger stick capillary blood sample and unstimulated saliva samples both before the event and upon dropout or completion...
March 2017: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989486/littered-cans-death-trap-of-snakes
#17
LETTER
Subhendu Mallik, Sudipta Ranjan Singh, Indramani Nath
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 15, 2016: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27939594/in-response-to-risk-determinants-of-acute-mountain-sickness-by-lawrence-and-reid
#18
LETTER
Gaurav Sikri, Srinivasa Bhattachar, Bikalp Thapa
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 6, 2016: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912864/clinical-and-epidemiological-aspects-of-scorpionism-in-the-world-a-systematic-review
#19
REVIEW
Maria S V Santos, Cláudio G L Silva, Basílio Silva Neto, Cícero R P Grangeiro Júnior, Victor H G Lopes, Antônio G Teixeira Júnior, Deryk A Bezerra, João V C P Luna, Josué B Cordeiro, Jucier Gonçalves Júnior, Marcos A P Lima
OBJECTIVE: Scorpion stings are registered worldwide, but the incidence and the features of the envenomations vary depending on the region. The aim of this review was to summarize the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data worldwide regarding humans stung by scorpions. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted through the online databases of the Virtual Health Library (VHL), which hosts Medline and the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Informational (LILACS) database...
December 2016: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912863/circadian-rhythm-and-sleep-during-prolonged-antarctic-residence-at-chinese-zhongshan-station
#20
Nan Chen, Quan Wu, Yanlei Xiong, Guang Chen, Dandan Song, Chengli Xu
OBJECTIVE: Residence at Zhongshan Station (69°22'24″S, 76°22'40″E) for over 1 year exposes winter-over members to marked changes of light-dark cycle, ranging from the constant daylight of polar days to the constant darkness of polar nights, in addition to geographic and social isolation. This extreme photoperiodic environment may increase the risk of sleep disturbances and circadian desynchrony. The aim of this study was to investigate the circadian rhythm and sleep phase of Chinese winter-over expeditioners at Zhongshan Station...
December 2016: Wilderness & Environmental Medicine
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