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Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429177/learning-from-one-s-own-errors-and-those-of-others
#1
Janet Metcalfe, Judy Xu
Three experiments investigated the effects of making errors oneself, as compared to just hearing the correct answer without error generation, hearing another person make an error, or being "on-the-hook," that is, possibly but not necessarily being the person who would be "called-on" to give a response. In all three experiments, generating either an error of commission or generating the correct response, oneself, out loud, compared to being a person who heard another's commission errors (or correct responses), was beneficial for later recall of the correct answer...
April 20, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429176/the-log-linear-response-function-of-the-bounded-number-line-task-is-unrelated-to-the-psychological-representation-of-quantity
#2
Dale J Cohen, Philip T Quinlan
The bounded number-line task has been used extensively to assess the numerical competence of both children and adults. One consistent finding has been that young children display a logarithmic response function, whereas older children and adults display a more linear response function. Traditionally, these log-linear functions have been interpreted as providing a transparent window onto the nature of the participants' psychological representations of quantity (termed here a direct response strategy). Here we show that the direct response strategy produces the log-linear response function regardless of whether the psychological representation of quantity is compressive or expansive...
April 20, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28409438/emotional-intelligence-buffers-the-effect-of-physiological-arousal-on-dishonesty
#3
Andrea Pittarello, Beatrice Conte, Marta Caserotti, Sara Scrimin, Enrico Rubaltelli
We studied the emotional processes that allow people to balance two competing desires: benefitting from dishonesty and keeping a positive self-image. We recorded physiological arousal (skin conductance and heart rate) during a computer card game in which participants could cheat and fail to report a certain card when presented on the screen to avoid losing their money. We found that higher skin conductance corresponded to lower cheating rates. Importantly, emotional intelligence regulated this effect; participants with high emotional intelligence were less affected by their physiological reactions than those with low emotional intelligence...
April 13, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405908/how-orthographic-specific-characteristics-shape-letter-position-coding-the-case-of-thai-script
#4
Manuel Perea, Heather Winskel, Pablo Gomez
A central question for any model of visual word identification is the representation of the position at which letters are encoded (e.g., calm vs. clam). In this article, we examine whether the orthographic-specific characteristics of a writing system-namely, Thai-shape the process of letter position coding. Thai is an alphabetic script that lacks interword spaces and has an orthographic order that does not necessarily correspond to the phonological order for initial vowels. This implies that the initial letter position coding in Thai needs to be flexible enough that readers can successfully encode the letter positions of words...
April 12, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405907/bayesian-data-analysis-for-newcomers
#5
John K Kruschke, Torrin M Liddell
This article explains the foundational concepts of Bayesian data analysis using virtually no mathematical notation. Bayesian ideas already match your intuitions from everyday reasoning and from traditional data analysis. Simple examples of Bayesian data analysis are presented that illustrate how the information delivered by a Bayesian analysis can be directly interpreted. Bayesian approaches to null-value assessment are discussed. The article clarifies misconceptions about Bayesian methods that newcomers might have acquired elsewhere...
April 12, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405906/cross-linguistic-transfer-in-bilinguals-reading-in-two-alphabetic-orthographies-the-grain-size-accommodation-hypothesis
#6
REVIEW
Marie Lallier, Manuel Carreiras
Reading acquisition is one of the most complex and demanding learning processes faced by children in their first years of schooling. If reading acquisition is challenging in one language, how is it when reading is acquired simultaneously in two languages? What is the impact of bilingualism on the development of literacy? We review behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from alphabetic writing systems suggesting that early bilingualism modulates reading development. Particularly, we show that cross-linguistic variations and cross-linguistic transfer affect bilingual reading strategies as well as their cognitive underpinnings...
April 12, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28397076/neural-evidence-for-predictive-coding-in-auditory-cortex-during-speech-production
#7
Kayoko Okada, William Matchin, Gregory Hickok
Recent models of speech production suggest that motor commands generate forward predictions of the auditory consequences of those commands, that these forward predications can be used to monitor and correct speech output, and that this system is hierarchically organized (Hickok, Houde, & Rong, Neuron, 69(3), 407--422, 2011; Pickering & Garrod, Behavior and Brain Sciences, 36(4), 329--347, 2013). Recent psycholinguistic research has shown that internally generated speech (i.e., imagined speech) produces different types of errors than does overt speech (Oppenheim & Dell, Cognition, 106(1), 528--537, 2008; Oppenheim & Dell, Memory & Cognition, 38(8), 1147-1160, 2010)...
April 10, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28397075/explanation-can-cause-forgetting-memory-dynamics-in-the-generation-of-new-arguments
#8
Julia S Soares, Benjamin C Storm
Retrieval-induced forgetting is observed when the retrieval of target information causes the forgetting of nontarget information. The present study investigated whether similar dynamics occur in the context of generating arguments in the process of explanation. Participants studied arguments associated with several issues before attempting to think of new arguments pertaining to a subset of those issues. When given a later memory test, participants were less likely to recall the studied arguments if they had attempted to think of new arguments than if they had not...
April 10, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28386858/contextual-utility-affects-the-perceived-quality-of-explanations
#9
Nadya Vasilyeva, Daniel Wilkenfeld, Tania Lombrozo
Are explanations of different kinds (formal, mechanistic, teleological) judged differently depending on their contextual utility, defined as the extent to which they support the kinds of inferences required for a given task? We report three studies demonstrating that the perceived "goodness" of an explanation depends on the evaluator's current task: Explanations receive a relative boost when they support task-relevant inferences, even when all three explanation types are warranted. For example, mechanistic explanations receive higher ratings when participants anticipate making further inferences on the basis of proximate causes than when they anticipate making further inferences on the basis of category membership or functions...
April 6, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28386857/reconstructing-the-recent-visual-past-hierarchical-knowledge-based-effects-in-visual-working-memory
#10
Marie Poirier, Daniel Heussen, Silvio Aldrovandi, Lauren Daniel, Saiyara Tasnim, James A Hampton
This paper presents two experiments that examine the influence of multiple levels of knowledge on visual working memory (VWM). Experiment 1 focused on memory for faces. Faces were selected from continua that were constructed by morphing two face photographs in 100 steps; half of the continua morphed a famous face into an unfamiliar one, while the other half used two unfamiliar faces. Participants studied six sequentially presented faces each from a different continuum, and at test they had to locate one of these within its continuum...
April 6, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378250/introduction-to-bayesian-inference-for-psychology
#11
Alexander Etz, Joachim Vandekerckhove
We introduce the fundamental tenets of Bayesian inference, which derive from two basic laws of probability theory. We cover the interpretation of probabilities, discrete and continuous versions of Bayes' rule, parameter estimation, and model comparison. Using seven worked examples, we illustrate these principles and set up some of the technical background for the rest of this special issue of Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. Supplemental material is available via https://osf.io/wskex/ .
April 4, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28374284/the-scope-of-formal-explanation
#12
Sandeep Prasada
The existence of multiple modes of explanation means that a crucial step in the process of generating explanations has to be selecting a particular mode. The present article identifies the key conceptual, as well as some pragmatic and epistemological, considerations that license the use of the formal mode of explanation, and thus that enter into the process of selecting and generating a formal explanation. Formal explanations explain the presence of certain properties in an instance of a kind by reference to the kind of thing it is (e...
April 3, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28364345/what-is-the-time-course-of-working-memory-attentional-refreshing
#13
Benoît Lemaire, Aurore Pageot, Gaën Plancher, Sophie Portrat
One way of maintaining information in working memory is through attentional refreshing, a process that was recently shown to be independent from verbal rehearsal. In the classical working memory complex span task, the usual assumption is that memoranda are refreshed in a cumulative fashion, starting from the first item, going in a forward order until the latest one, and cycling until there is no time to continue the process. However, there is no evidence that refreshing operates in that way. The present study proposes a computational modelling study, which constitutes a powerful method to investigate alternative hypotheses...
March 31, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361436/the-effect-of-character-contextual-diversity-on-eye-movements-in-chinese-sentence-reading
#14
Qingrong Chen, Guoxia Zhao, Xin Huang, Yiming Yang, Michael K Tanenhaus
Chen, Huang, et al. (Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 2017) found that when reading two-character Chinese words embedded in sentence contexts, contextual diversity (CD), a measure of the proportion of texts in which a word appears, affected fixation times to words. When CD is controlled, however, frequency did not affect reading times. Two experiments used the same experimental designs to examine whether there are frequency effects of the first character of two-character words when CD is controlled. In Experiment 1, yoked triples of characters from a control group, a group matched for character CD that is lower in frequency, and a group matched in frequency with the control group, but higher in character CD, were rotated through the same sentence frame...
March 30, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361435/the-time-course-of-morphological-processing-during-spoken-word-recognition-in-chinese
#15
Wei Shen, Qingqing Qu, Aiping Ni, Junyi Zhou, Xingshan Li
We investigated the time course of morphological processing during spoken word recognition using the printed-word paradigm. Chinese participants were asked to listen to a spoken disyllabic compound word while simultaneously viewing a printed-word display. Each visual display consisted of three printed words: a semantic associate of the first constituent of the compound word (morphemic competitor), a semantic associate of the whole compound word (whole-word competitor), and an unrelated word (distractor). Participants were directed to detect whether the spoken target word was on the visual display...
March 30, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28357629/testing-the-validity-of-conflict-drift-diffusion-models-for-use-in-estimating-cognitive-processes-a-parameter-recovery-study
#16
Corey N White, Mathieu Servant, Gordon D Logan
Researchers and clinicians are interested in estimating individual differences in the ability to process conflicting information. Conflict processing is typically assessed by comparing behavioral measures like RTs or error rates from conflict tasks. However, these measures are hard to interpret because they can be influenced by additional processes like response caution or bias. This limitation can be circumvented by employing cognitive models to decompose behavioral data into components of underlying decision processes, providing better specificity for investigating individual differences...
March 29, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353065/four-reasons-to-prefer-bayesian-analyses-over-significance-testing
#17
Zoltan Dienes, Neil Mclatchie
Inference using significance testing and Bayes factors is compared and contrasted in five case studies based on real research. The first study illustrates that the methods will often agree, both in motivating researchers to conclude that H1 is supported better than H0, and the other way round, that H0 is better supported than H1. The next four, however, show that the methods will also often disagree. In these cases, the aim of the paper will be to motivate the sensible evidential conclusion, and then see which approach matches those intuitions...
March 28, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349383/right-away-a-late-right-lateralized-category-effect-complements-an-early-left-lateralized-category-effect-in-visual-search
#18
Merryn D Constable, Stefanie I Becker
According to the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, learned semantic categories can influence early perceptual processes. A central finding in support of this view is the lateralized category effect-namely, the finding that categorically different colors (e.g., blue and green hues) can be discriminated faster than colors within the same color category (e.g., different hues of green), especially when they are presented in the right visual field. Because the right visual field projects to the left hemisphere, this finding has been popularly couched in terms of the left-lateralization of language...
March 27, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28337647/revisiting-the-role-of-language-in-spatial-cognition-categorical-perception-of-spatial-relations-in-english-and-korean-speakers
#19
Kevin J Holmes, Kelsey Moty, Terry Regier
The spatial relation of support has been regarded as universally privileged in nonlinguistic cognition and immune to the influence of language. English, but not Korean, obligatorily distinguishes support from nonsupport via basic spatial terms. Despite this linguistic difference, previous research suggests that English and Korean speakers show comparable nonlinguistic sensitivity to the support/nonsupport distinction. Here, using a paradigm previously found to elicit cross-language differences in color discrimination, we provide evidence for a difference in sensitivity to support/nonsupport between native English speakers and native Korean speakers who were late English learners and tested in a context that privileged Korean...
March 23, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28337646/the-puzzle-of-study-time-allocation-for-the-most-challenging-items
#20
Monika Undorf, Rakefet Ackerman
Learners often allocate more study time to challenging items than to easier ones. Nevertheless, both predicted and actual memory performance are typically worse for difficult than for easier items. The resulting inverse relations between people's predictions of their memory performance (judgments of learning; JOLs) and self-paced study time (ST) are often explained by bottom-up, data-driven ST allocation that is based on fluency. However, we demonstrate robust inverted U-shaped relations between JOLs and ST that cannot be explained by data-driven ST allocation alone...
March 23, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
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