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Journal of the History of the Neurosciences

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28613979/stephen-t-casper-the-neurologists-a-history-of-a-medical-specialty-in-modern-britain-c-1789-2000
#1
Tara H Abraham
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 14, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28605307/neil-anderson-dusty-allan-rediscovered-a-neurologist-s-life
#2
Catherine E Storey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 12, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532281/ondine-s-curse-with-jean-giraudoux-s-finishing-touches
#3
Régis Olry, Duane E Haines
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 22, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28521659/tabes-dorsalis-not-at-all-elementary-my-dear-watson
#4
Régis Olry, Duane E Haines
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 19, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511022/armin-wagner-and-holger-steinberg-neurologie-an-der-universit%C3%A3-t-leipzig-beitr%C3%A3-ge-zur-entwicklung-des-klinischen-fachgebietes-von-1880-bis-1985
#5
Peter J Koehler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 16, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471291/thomas-mann-s-depiction-of-neurosyphilis-and-other-diseases
#6
François Boller, Nicoletta Caputi
Thomas Mann (1875-1955), a Nobel Prize recipient rightly considered one of the great novelists of the twentieth century, was one of the most medically perceptive writers of recent times. His novels take place against the background of the different plagues (tuberculosis, cholera) that characterized the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. One of Mann's later novels, Doctor Faustus, is set against a background of syphilis. In the 500-page book, which is subtitled The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkühn as told by a Friend, we see the theologian turned composer make a pact with the devil...
May 4, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414619/how-the-nerves-reached-the-muscle-bernard-katz-stephen-w-kuffler-and-john-c-eccles-certain-implications-of-exile-for-the-development-of-twentieth-century-neurophysiology
#7
Frank W Stahnisch
This article explores the work by Bernard Katz (1911-2003), Stephen W. Kuffler (1913-1980), and John C. Eccles (1903-1997) on the nerve-muscle junction as a milestone in twentieth-century neurophysiology with wider scientific implications. The historical question is approached from two perspectives: (a) an investigation of twentieth-century solutions to a longer physiological dispute and (b) an examination of a new kind of laboratory and academic cooperation. From this vantage point, the work pursued in Sydney by Sir John Carew Eccles' team on the neuromuscular junction is particularly valuable, since it contributed a central functional element to modern physiological understanding regarding the function and structure of the human and animal nervous system...
April 17, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622110/pavlov-and-cajal-two-different-pathways-to-a-nobel-prize
#8
Jairo A Rozo, Yuniesky Andrade-Talavera, Antonio Rodríguez-Moreno
Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936) and Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) were two contemporary scientists who not only had a great impact on Russian and Spanish science but also on the international stage. Both shared several common features in their life and work, yet they followed fundamentally different paths during their training as scientists. While Pavlov received his laboratory training under the guidance of Ilya Tsion (1843-1912), Cajal did not receive any formal training within a particular laboratory nor did he have a mentor in the traditional sense, rather he was mainly self-taught, although he was supported by key figures like Maestre de San Juan (1828-1890) and Luis Simarro (1851-1921)...
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28498734/neurhistalert-23
#9
Frank W Stahnisch, Jyh Yung Hor
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471333/reply-by-alexandr-chv%C3%A3-tal
#10
Alexandr Chvátal
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471322/robert-bentley-todd-s-contributions-to-the-structure-and-function-of-nerve-tissue
#11
Devin K Binder, Edward H Reynolds
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28394694/the-death-of-sir-victor-horsley-1857-1916-and-his-burial-in-amarah
#12
Nadeem Toodayan
Sir Victor Alexander Haden Horsley (1857-1916), the pioneering British neurological surgeon, passed away 100 years ago. He died young in his sixtieth year from the effects of heat stroke while serving as consulting military surgeon to the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force in Amarah, modern-day Iraq, and was buried in the now largely abandoned "Amara War Cemetery." By the time of his death in 1916, Victor Horsley had established himself as one of the most eminent innovators of modern neurological surgery. His pioneering researches in cerebral physiology earned him an early reputation in the field, and his experiences with vivisection allowed him to confidently operate on the brain and spinal cord at a time when surgical intervention of the nervous system was fraught with uncertainty...
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28368685/the-complicity-of-friends-how-george-eliot-g-h-lewes-and-john-hughlings-jackson-encoded-herbert-spencer-s-secret-by-martin-n-raitiere
#13
Samuel H Greenblatt
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28136158/jan-evangelista-purkyn%C3%A4-1787-1869-and-his-instruments-for-microscopic-research-in-the-field-of-neuroscience
#14
Alexandr Chvátal
The findings obtained by the famous nineteenth-century Czech scientist Jan Evangelista Purkyně (1787-1869) in the field of microscopic structure of animal and human tissues, including the brain, spinal cord, and nerves, have already been described in depth in a number of older and newer publications. The present article contains an overview of the instruments and tools that Purkyně and his assistants used for microscopic research of tissue histology. Some of these instruments were developed either by Purkyně alone, such as the microtomic compressor, or together with his assistant Adolph Oschatz, such as the microtome...
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27608268/the-devil-always-experienced-malicious-pleasure-in-imposing-himself-in-neuropsychiatric-nosology
#15
Régis Olry, Duane E Haines
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27602871/epilepsy-ammon-s-horn-sclerosis-and-camille-bouchet
#16
Mervyn J Eadie
Increasing interest into the relationship between Ammon's horn sclerosis (hippocampal sclerosis) and epilepsy seems to have developed after 1880 when Sommer's paper appeared. Bouchet and Cazauvieilh had published the original description of the hippocampal anatomical abnormality in 1825 while attempting to locate the cerebral sites of origin of epilepsy and insanity. However, they offered no interpretation of the significance of the structural change. What has sometimes not been noticed in the subsequent literature is that, after a further investigation, in 1853, Bouchet described the change in 18 of 43 additional brains from persons with epilepsy...
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26927541/vincenc-alexandr-bohd%C3%A3-lek-1801-1883-czech-anatomist-and-neuroscientist-of-the-nineteenth-century
#17
Alexandr Chvátal, David Kachlík
Vincenc Alexandr Bohdálek (Vincenz Alexander Bochdalek) was a well-known anatomist and pathologist in the nineteenth century. Today, however, his name is all but forgotten. Bohdálek described a number of anatomical structures; some of them became eponyms. Unfortunately, his findings concerning the innervation of the eye, upper jaw, hard palate, auditory system, and meninges are little known today. This current overview is based on available archival sources and provides an insight into his results in the field of nervous system research, which account for almost half his work...
April 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318373/thank-you-stan
#18
Paul Eling, Peter J Koehler, Frank W Stahnisch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 20, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28273005/what-is-in-a-word-neuron-early-usage-and-evolution-in-antiquity-to-its-long-lasting-current-significance
#19
Eugenio Frixione
Neuron, a Greek term with a rustic background, made much of its way to its current significance since antiquity, when full recognition was achieved that sensory and motor signals travel through the animal body along nerves (neura, plural). Drawing from classic and recent historical scholarship, this study identifies the successive steps toward such a major breakthrough, starting from the usage of the expression in archaic times and continuing up to the much later transference of a mature theory into the modern world...
March 8, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632023/on-the-origin-of-the-term-decussatio-pyramidum
#20
František Šimon
There is no consensus regarding the origin of the term decussatio pyramidum. Various anatomists of the past are honored by modern scholars, for example, Vieussens, Reil, and Collins. However, contralateral effects of brain lesions were already mentioned in Hippocratic treatises. Aretaeus of Cappadocia assumed that the anatomical reason for this phenomenon is the interchange of the nerves and called it chiasmos. This opinion was discussed in modern times and the anatomists used the term decussatio nervorum. The authorship of the first demonstration of decussatio pyramidum is given to Mistichelli (1709) and Petit (1710), but neither the term decussatio nor any of its vernacular forms are present in their work...
February 28, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
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