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Journal of the History of the Neurosciences

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29173053/alfred-walter-campbell-s-return-to-australia
#1
Malcolm Macmillan
Alfred Walter Campbell (1868-1937) established the basic cytoarchitectonic structure of the human brain while he was working as a pathologist at the Rainhill Lunatic Asylum near Liverpool in the United Kingdom. He returned to Australia in 1905 and continued doing research while establishing a neurological practice. His research over the next 17 years focused on four topics: (a) localisation in the cerebellum, (b) the neuroses and psychoses in war, (c) localisation in the cerebral cortex of the gorilla, and (d) the causes and pathology of the mysterious Australian "X" Disease (later known as Murray Valley encephalitis)...
November 27, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28976244/yorkshire-s-influence-on-the-understanding-and-treatment-of-mental-diseases-in-victorian-britain-the-golden-triad-of-york-wakefield-and-leeds
#2
Henry R Rollin, Edward H Reynolds
In the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a more humane approach to the care of the insane in Britain was catalyzed in part by the illness of King George III. The Reform Movement envisaged "moral" treatment in asylums in pleasant rural environments, but these aspirations were overwhelmed by industrialization, urbanization, and the scale of the need, such that most asylums became gigantic institutions for chronic insanity. Three institutions in Yorkshire remained beacons of enlightenment in the general gloom of Victorian alienism: the Retreat in York founded and developed by the Quaker Tuke family; the West Riding Lunatic Asylum in Wakefield led by Sir James Crichton-Browne, which initiated research into brain and mental diseases; and the Leeds Medical School and Wakefield axis associated with Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt, which pioneered teaching of mental diseases and, later, the first Chair of Psychiatry...
October 4, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922095/end-of-volume-editorial-board
#3
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28862914/oliver-sacks-1933-2015-a-belated-obituary
#4
Nicolaas J M Arts
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28820658/snowy-campbell-australian-pioneer-investigator-of-the-brain-by-malcom-macmillan
#5
Neil E Anderson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28820655/art-and-the-brain-plasticity-embodiment-and-the-unclosed-circle-by-amy-ione
#6
Frank W Stahnisch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812442/clarification-by-richard-leblanc
#7
Richard Leblanc
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28657462/the-reception-of-gall-s-organology-in-early-nineteenth-century-vilnius
#8
Eglė Sakalauskaitė-Juodeikienė, Paul Eling, Stanley Finger
Much has been written about the development and reception of Franz Joseph Gall's (1758-1828) ideas in Western Europe. There has been little coverage, however, of how his Schädellehre or organology was received in Eastern Europe. With this in mind, we examined the transmission and acceptance/rejection of Gall's doctrine in Vilnius (now Lithuania). We shall focus on what two prominent professors at Vilnius University felt about organology. The first of these men was Andrew Sniadecki (1768-1838), who published an article on Gall's system in the journal Dziennik Wileński in 1805...
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632022/the-wounded-brain-healed-the-golden-age-of-the-montreal-neurological-institute-1934-1984-by-william-feindel-and-richard-leblanc
#9
Yvan Prkachin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632021/neuromyelitis-optica-application-of-computer-diagnostics-to-historical-case-reports
#10
Pablo Garcia Reitboeck, Peter Garrard, Timothy Peters
The retrospective diagnosis of illnesses by medical historians can often be difficult and prone to bias, although knowledge of the medical disorders of historical figures is key to the understanding of their behavior and reactions. The recent application of computer diagnostics to historical figures allows an objective differential diagnosis to be accomplished. Taking an example from clinical neurology, we analyzed the earliest reported cases of Devic's disease (neuromyelitis optica) that commonly affects the optic nerve and spinal cord and was previously often confused with multiple sclerosis...
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28613979/the-neurologists-a-history-of-a-medical-specialty-in-modern-britain-c-1789-2000-by-stephen-t-casper
#11
Tara H Abraham
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28605307/dusty-allan-rediscovered-a-neurologist-s-life-by-neil-anderson
#12
Catherine E Storey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511022/neurologie-an-der-universit%C3%A3-t-leipzig-beitr%C3%A3-ge-zur-entwicklung-des-klinischen-fachgebietes-von-1880-bis-1985-by-armin-wagner-and-holger-steinberg
#13
Peter J Koehler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414619/how-the-nerves-reached-the-muscle-bernard-katz-stephen-w-kuffler-and-john-c-eccles-certain-implications-of-exile-for-the-development-of-twentieth-century-neurophysiology
#14
Frank W Stahnisch
This article explores the work by Bernard Katz (1911-2003), Stephen W. Kuffler (1913-1980), and John C. Eccles (1903-1997) on the nerve-muscle junction as a milestone in twentieth-century neurophysiology with wider scientific implications. The historical question is approached from two perspectives: (a) an investigation of twentieth-century solutions to a longer physiological dispute and (b) an examination of a new kind of laboratory and academic cooperation. From this vantage point, the work pursued in Sydney by Sir John Carew Eccles' team on the neuromuscular junction is particularly valuable, since it contributed a central functional element to modern physiological understanding regarding the function and structure of the human and animal nervous system...
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28273005/what-is-in-a-word-neuron-early-usage-and-evolution-in-antiquity-to-its-long-lasting-current-significance
#15
Eugenio Frixione
Neuron, a Greek term with a rustic background, made much of its way to its current significance since antiquity, when full recognition was achieved that sensory and motor signals travel through the animal body along nerves (neura, plural). Drawing from classic and recent historical scholarship, this study identifies the successive steps toward such a major breakthrough, starting from the usage of the expression in archaic times and continuing up to the much later transference of a mature theory into the modern world...
October 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28876177/ancient-indian-concepts-about-phenomenology-biology-and-therapeutics-of-epilepsy
#16
Ravindra Arya
This article discusses etiology, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment of epilepsy, as described in Charaka Samhitā (translation: Charaka's Compendium) and Sushruta Samhitā, the two core texts of Ayurveda, an ancient system of medicine. Ayurveda emphasized amnesia and loss of consciousness as core features of epileptic seizures (Sanskrit: apasmar; translation: apa negation, smaran memory) and recognized that seizures occur due to a disturbance in brain function or flow of "humors" to the brain. Semiology of various seizure types was well described...
September 6, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777693/beyond-descriptive-neurology-broca-cerebral-hemodynamics-and-cortical-function
#17
Richard Leblanc
Pierre-Paul Broca's studies in neurobiology remain of interest. I review a previously neglected aspect of Broca's work in which he presages the use of modern scanning techniques. Broca's goal was to correlate cerebral metabolism to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) using a novel method, to which he referred as cerebral thermometry. Broca attempted to measure changes in temperatures from the ischemic area and across the watershed regions during a stroke, and the increased CBF produced by performing a cognitive task such as reading aloud...
August 4, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768112/the-disparate-histories-of-binocular-vision-and-binaural-hearing
#18
Nicholas J Wade
Vision and hearing are dependent on disparities of spatial patterns received by two eyes and on time and intensity differences to two ears. However, the experiences of a single world have masked attention to these disparities. While eyes and ears are paired, there has not been parity in the attention directed to their functioning. Phenomena involving binocular vision were commented upon since antiquity whereas those about binaural hearing are much more recent. This history is compared with respect to the experimental manipulations of dichoptic and dichotic stimuli and the instruments used to stimulate the paired organs...
August 2, 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622110/pavlov-and-cajal-two-different-pathways-to-a-nobel-prize
#19
Jairo A Rozo, Yuniesky Andrade-Talavera, Antonio Rodríguez-Moreno
Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936) and Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) were two contemporary scientists who not only had a great impact on Russian and Spanish science but also on the international stage. Both shared several common features in their life and work, yet they followed fundamentally different paths during their training as scientists. While Pavlov received his laboratory training under the guidance of Ilya Tsion (1843-1912), Cajal did not receive any formal training within a particular laboratory nor did he have a mentor in the traditional sense, rather he was mainly self-taught, although he was supported by key figures like Maestre de San Juan (1828-1890) and Luis Simarro (1851-1921)...
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28498734/neurhistalert-23
#20
Frank W Stahnisch, Jyh Yung Hor
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
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