Read by QxMD icon Read

Journal of Travel Medicine

Stefano Veraldi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Lin H Chen, Karin Leder, Kira A Barbre, Patricia Schlagenhauf, Michael Libman, Jay Keystone, Marc Mendelson, Philippe Gautret, Eli Schwartz, Marc Shaw, Sue MacDonald, Anne McCarthy, Bradley A Connor, Douglas H Esposito, Davidson Hamer, Mary E Wilson
Background: Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. Methods: GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Claire Tantet, Camille Aupiais, Mathilde Bourdon, Frédéric Sorge, Adèle Pagès, Dora Levy, Barthélémy Lafon-Desmurs, Albert Faye
We investigated the knowledge of female genital mutilation (FGM) among 60 general and 52 specialized travel medicine practitioners. Less than 50% of these practitioners had adequate knowledge of FGM. Only 42.9% declared having encountered FGM. FGM is likely underestimated in health facilities. Medical education and supporting information should be developed to better address and prevent FGM.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Stefan H F Hagmann, John C Christenson, Philip R Fischer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Markus Tannheimer, Rianne van der Spek, Raimund Lechner, Jürgen Steinacker, Gunnar Treff
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
N Rodriguez-Valero, P Castro, G Martinez, J Marco Hernandez, S Fernandez, J Gascon, J M Nicolas
Blackwater fever was typically reported after quinine administration, although it is poor recognized in patients receiving artesunate. This case describes a blackwater fever in a non-immune patient after artesunate for severe malaria. It highlights the importance of monitoring haemolytic parameters in severe malaria to avoid renal impairment or severe anaemia.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Niall Johnston, Nichola Sandys, Rosemary Geoghegan, Diarmuid O'Donovan, Gerard Flaherty
Background: Increasingly, medical students from developed countries are undertaking international medical electives in developing countries. Medical students understand the many benefits of these electives, such as the opportunity to develop clinical skills, to gain insight into global health issues and to travel to interesting regions of the world. However, they may be much less aware of the risk to their health and wellbeing while abroad. Compounding this problem, medical students may not seek advice from travel medicine practitioners and often receive inadequate or no information from their medical school prior to departure...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Delphine Lebrun, Thierry Floch, Aurélie Brunet, Gautier Julien, Juliette Romaru, Yohan N'Guyen, Joël Cousson, Aurélien Giltat, Dominique Toubas, Firouzé Bani-Sadr
Delayed onset haemolysis occurring post-artesunate and post-artemisinin combination therapy is secondary to delayed clearance of infected erythrocytes spared by pitting during treatment. We report a case of severe post-treatment delayed haemolytic anaemia with a positive direct antiglobulin test and a positive response to corticosteroid therapy, suggesting an associated immune mechanism.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Davidson H Hamer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Bradley A Connor, Marina Rogova, Olga Whyte
Background: Diarrhea is one of the most common ailments afflicting travelers with attack rates of 30-40% for medium to high-risk destinations. As travelers' diarrhea (TD) is syndromic and caused by a wide range of pathogens, including bacteria, parasites and viruses, multiplex deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology can be useful for determining the etiology of TD pathogens. Objective: The goal of this retrospective study was to produce clinically relevant and useful data on gastrointestinal illness related to travel identified by culture-independent methods of diagnosis-use of the multiplex DNA extraction PCR platform (BioFire FilmArray GI Panel) and to describe the use of this technology in detection of enteric pathogens...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Agathe Nouchi, Gentiane Monsel, Marie Jaspard, Arnaud Jannic, Emmanouil Angelakis, Eric Caumes
Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae is now a well-known cause of human rickettsial infection, with 52 reported cases, including 47 in southern Europe and one in South Africa. We report the first case of R. sibirica mongolitimonae in Central Africa, likely a sentinel case for a more common disease than originally suspected.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Fabienne Huber, Benoît Ehrensperger, Christoph Hatz, François Chappuis, Silja Bühler, Gilles Eperon
Background: Patients increasingly benefit from immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medications for a range of conditions allowing them a lifestyle similar to healthy individuals, including travel. However, the administration of live vaccines to immunodeficient patients bears the risk of replication of the attenuated vaccine microorganism. Therefore, live vaccines are generally contraindicated on immunosuppression. Data on live vaccinations on immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory medication are scarce...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Eri Nakayama, Shigeru Tajima, Akira Kotaki, Ken-Ichi Shibasaki, Kentaro Itokawa, Kengo Kato, Akifumi Yamashita, Tsuyoshi Sekizuka, Makoto Kuroda, Takashi Tomita, Masayuki Saijo, Tomohiko Takasaki
Background: Due to the huge 2-way human traffic between Japan and Chikungunya (CHIK) fever-endemic regions, 89 imported cases of CHIK fever were confirmed in Japan from January 2006 to June 2016. Fifty-four of 89 cases were confirmed virologically and serologically at the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Japan and we present the demographic profiles of the patients and the phylogenetic features of 14 CHIK virus (CHIKV) isolates. Methods: Patients were diagnosed with CHIK fever by a combination of virus isolation, viral RNA amplification, IgM antibody-, IgG antibody-, and/or neutralizing antibody detection...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Philipp Stahl, Yves Poinsignon, Pascal Pouedras, Vasilica Ciubotaru, Laurence Berry, Brinda Emu, Peter J Krause, Choukri Ben Mamoun, Emmanuel Cornillot
Background: In 2002, a previously healthy 69-year-old man travelled to France from the United States and presented to our hospital with a febrile illness that subsequently was determined to be babesiosis. The blood isolated from this patient served as a source for propagation of the Babesia microti R1 strain with subsequent sequencing and annotation of the parasite genome. Methods: Upon admission, we obtained a medical history, performed a physical examination, and examined his blood for the presence of a blood borne pathogen by microscopy, PCR and indirect immunofluorescence antibody testing...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Jutarmas Olanwijitwong, Saranath Lawpoolsri, Thitiya Ponam, Preechapol Puengpholpool, Chollasap Sharma, Lapakorn Chatapat, Vichan Pawan, Chatporn Kittitrakul, Watcharapong Piyaphanee
Background: The number of international travellers visiting Myanmar increases each year. However, information about pre-travel preparation and incidence of health problems among these travellers is limited. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at three international airports in Thailand. Travellers returning from Myanmar completed questionnaires querying demographic profile, pre-travel health preparations and health problems during their stay in Myanmar...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Stephen M Smith
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Richard Bodington, Owen Johnson, Pippa Carveth-Johnson, Shoaib Faruqi
Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is a common condition for which continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment. The condition affects a population of which a substantial proportion will be travelling. Methods: We use a questionnaire survey of CPAP users to gain understanding regarding the behaviours, attitudes and problems surrounding travel with CPAP machines during travel and while abroad. All CPAP patients on our database at a UK district general hospital reviewed over a period of 4 years were sent a postal questionnaire...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Elisa Rubio, Miguel J Martínez, Verónica Gonzalo, Josep Barrachina, Núria Torner, Ana I Martínez, Mireia Jané, Anna Vilella, Ana Del Rio, Natalia Rodriguez-Valero, Maria Jesús Pinazo, José Muñoz, Alex Soriano, Antoni Trilla, Jordi Vila, Ma Ángeles Marcos
We evaluated the microbiological diagnosis in 14 patients with epidemiological and clinical suspicion of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) attended in a non-endemic area between June 2015 and January 2017. While no MERS-CoV was detected, other respiratory viruses were identified in 12 cases and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in 1 case.
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Batel Nissan, Tamar Lachish, Eli Schwartz
Background: Persistent abdominal symptoms (PAS) are common among returning-travellers. In the absence of sensitive tests to identify intestinal parasites, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms often remain a diagnostic challenge. In this study we examined the effectiveness of empirical anti-parasitic treatment in returning-travellers with PAS despite no positive stool-test. Methods: A retrospective study among returning travellers who approached the clinic between the years 2014 and 2016 with GI complaints without a positive stool-test...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Paola Zanotti, Silvia Odolini, Lina Rachele Tomasoni, Cecilia Grecchi, Silvio Caligaris, Maurizio Gulletta, Alberto Matteelli, Veronica Cappa, Francesco Castelli
Background: Even though malaria incidence is decreasing worldwide, travel-related cases reported in Europe have remained stable in recent years. In Italy, incidence had increased in the 1990s, reaching a peak in 1999; a slow decline was then reported over the subsequent decade. To our knowledge, few published data are available on imported malaria in Italy since 2010. In this article we aimed to analyse trends in imported malaria in the teaching hospital of Brescia, northern Italy, over the last 18 years...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Travel Medicine
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"