journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224293/health-without-care-vulnerability-medical-brain-drain-and-health-worker-responsibilities-in-underserved-contexts
#1
Yusuf Yuksekdag
There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue-while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first step of her defence of emigration restrictions, Brock provides three reasons why skilled workers themselves would hold responsibilities to assist with respect to vital needs of their compatriots...
February 21, 2017: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28161761/beyond-fair-benefits-reconsidering-exploitation-arguments-against-organ-markets
#2
Julian J Koplin
One common objection to establishing regulated live donor organ markets is that such markets would be exploitative. Perhaps surprisingly, exploitation arguments against organ markets have been widely rejected in the philosophical literature on the subject. It is often argued that concerns about exploitation should be addressed by increasing the price paid to organ sellers, not by banning the trade outright. I argue that this analysis rests on a particular conception of exploitation (which I refer to as 'fair benefits' exploitation), and outline two additional ways that the charge of exploitation can be understood (which I discuss in terms of 'fair process' exploitation and complicity in injustice)...
February 4, 2017: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074373/introduction-to-the-special-issue-precarious-solidarity-preferential-access-in-canadian-health-care
#3
Lynette Reid
Systems of universal health coverage may aspire to provide care based on need and not ability to pay; the complexities of this aspiration (conceptual, practical, and ethical) call for normative analysis. This special issue arises in the wake of a judicial inquiry into preferential access in the Canadian province of Alberta, the Vertes Commission. I describe this inquiry and set out a taxonomy of forms of differential and preferential access. Papers in this special issue focus on the conceptual specification of health system boundaries (the concept of medical need) and on the normative questions raised by complex models of funding and delivery of care, where patients, providers, and services cross system boundaries...
January 10, 2017: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28062971/cost-equivalence-and-pluralism-in-publicly-funded-health-care-systems
#4
Dominic Wilkinson, Julian Savulescu
Clinical guidelines summarise available evidence on medical treatment, and provide recommendations about the most effective and cost-effective options for patients with a given condition. However, sometimes patients do not desire the best available treatment. Should doctors in a publicly-funded healthcare system ever provide sub-optimal medical treatment? On one view, it would be wrong to do so, since this would violate the ethical principle of beneficence, and predictably lead to harm for patients. It would also, potentially, be a misuse of finite health resources...
January 6, 2017: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27990588/no-longer-home-alone-home-care-and-the-canada-health-act
#5
Monique Lanoix
In this paper, I argue that addressing the medical needs of older persons warrants expanding the array of insured services as described by the Canada Health Act (CHA) to include home care. The growing importance of chronic care supports my call for federally regulated home care services as the nature of disease management has changed significantly in the last decades. In addition, if the values of equity, fairness and solidarity, which are the keystone values of the CHA, are to be upheld within the current social and demographic context, then Canada's health care system should adapt accordingly...
December 18, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942987/research-translation-and-emerging-health-technologies-synthetic-biology-and-beyond
#6
Sarah Chan
New health technologies are rapidly emerging from various areas of bioscience research, such as gene editing, regenerative medicine and synthetic biology. These technologies raise promising medical possibilities but also a range of ethical considerations. Apart from the issues involved in considering whether novel health technologies can or should become part of mainstream medical treatment once established, the process of research translation to develop such therapies itself entails particular ethical concerns...
December 9, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25103422/rethinking-moral-expertise
#7
Nicky Priaulx, Martin Weinel, Anthony Wrigley
We argue that the way in which the concept of expertise is understood and invoked has prevented progress in the debate as to whether moral philosophers can be said to be 'moral experts'. We offer an account of expertise that draws on the role of tacit knowledge in order to provide a basis upon which the debate can progress. Our analysis consists of three parts. In the first part we highlight two specific problems in the way that the concept of expertise has been invoked in the moral expertise debate, namely the understanding of expertise as an exclusive concept and the conflation of expertise with the idea of 'authority'...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25070014/nurturing-cultural-change-in-care-for-older-people-seeing-the-cherry-tree-blossom
#8
Miranda M W C Snoeren, Bienke M Janssen, Theo J H Niessen, Tineke A Abma
There is a need for person-centred approaches and empowerment of staff within the residential care for older people; a movement called 'culture change'. There is however no single path for achieving culture change. With the aim of increasing understandings about cultural change processes and the promotion of cultural values and norms associated with person-centred practices, this article presents an action research project set on a unit in the Netherlands providing care for older people with dementia. The project is presented as a case study...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25034416/free-choice-and-patient-best-interests
#9
Emma C Bullock
In medical practice, the doctrine of informed consent is generally understood to have priority over the medical practitioner's duty of care to her patient. A common consequentialist argument for the prioritisation of informed consent above the duty of care involves the claim that respect for a patient's free choice is the best way of protecting that patient's best interests; since the patient has a special expertise over her values and preferences regarding non-medical goods she is ideally placed to make a decision that will protect her interests...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/25030339/health-2-0-relational-resources-for-the-development-of-quality-in-healthcare
#10
Celiane Camargo-Borges, Murilo Santos Moscheta
Traditional approaches in healthcare have been challenged giving way to broader forms of users' participation in treatment. In this article we present the Health 2.0 movement as an example of relational and participatory practices in healthcare. Health 2.0 is an approach in which participation is the major aim, aspiring to reshape the system into more collaborative and less hierarchical relationships. We offer two illustrations in order to discuss how Health 2.0 is related and can contribute to a positive uptake of patient's knowledge, which implies challenging healthcare practices exclusively focused on scientific expertise...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24934390/clinical-specificities-in-obesity-care-the-transformations-and-dissolution-of-will-and-drives
#11
Else Vogel
Public debate about who or what is to blame for the rising rates of obesity and overweight shifts between two extreme opinions. The first posits overweight as the result of a lack of individual will, the second as the outcome of bodily drives, potentially triggered by the environment. Even though apparently clashing, these positions are in fact two faces of the same liberal coin. When combined, drives figure as a complication on the road to health, while a strong will should be able to counter obesity. Either way, the body's propensity to eat is to be put under control...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24891191/posthumous-organ-retention-and-use-in-ghana-regulating-individual-familial-and-societal-interests
#12
Divine Ndonbi Banyubala
The question of whether individuals retain interests or can be harmed after death is highly contentious, particularly within the context of deceased organ retrieval, retention and use. This paper argues that posthumous interests and/or harms can and do exist in the Konkomba (and wider Ghanaian) traditional setting through the concept of ancestorship, a reputational concept of immense cultural and existential significance in this setting. I adopt Joel Feinberg's account of harms as a setback to interests. The paper argues that a socio-culturally sensitive regulatory framework does not necessarily exclude the donation of (deceased) human biomaterials for transplant and science research...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24833195/fallacy-or-functionality-law-and-policy-of-patient-treatment-choice-in-the-nhs
#13
Maria K Sheppard
It has been claimed that beneath the government rhetoric of patient choice, no real choice exists either in law or in National Health Service (NHS) policy (Whiteman in Health Care Anal 21:146-170, 2013). Thus, choice is considered to be a fallacy in that patients are not able to demand specific treatment, but are only able to express preferences amongst the available options. This article argues that, rather than considering choice only in terms of patient autonomy or consumer rights, choice ought to be seen as serving other functions: Choice serves as a mechanism of destabilisation, i...
December 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27896539/why-health-and-social-care-support-for-people-with-long-term-conditions-should-be-oriented-towards-enabling-them-to-live-well
#14
Vikki A Entwistle, Alan Cribb, John Owens
There are various reasons why efforts to promote "support for self-management" have rarely delivered the kinds of sustainable improvements in healthcare experiences, health and wellbeing that policy leaders internationally have hoped for. This paper explains how the basis of failure is in some respects built into the ideas that underpin many of these efforts. When (the promotion of) support for self-management is narrowly oriented towards educating and motivating patients to adopt the behaviours recommended for disease control, it implicitly reflects and perpetuates limited and somewhat instrumental views of patients...
November 28, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27734213/the-ir-relevance-of-group-size-in-health-care-priority-setting-a-reply-to-juth
#15
Lars Sandman, Erik Gustavsson
How to handle orphan drugs for rare diseases is a pressing problem in current health-care. Due to the group size of patients affecting the cost of treatment, they risk being disadvantaged in relation to existing cost-effectiveness thresholds. In an article by Niklas Juth it has been argued that it is irrelevant to take indirectly operative factors like group size into account since such a compensation would risk discounting the use of cost, a relevant factor, altogether. In this article we analyze Juth's argument and observe that we already do compensate for indirectly operative factors, both outside and within cost-effectiveness evaluations, for formal equality reasons...
October 12, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27614688/the-athletic-body
#16
Andrew Edgar
This paper seeks to explore the attraction and the beauty of the contemporary athletic body. It will be suggested that a body shaped through muscular bulk and definition has come to be seen as aesthetically normative. This body differs from the body of athletes from the early and mid-twentieth century. It will be argued that the contemporary body is not merely the result of advances in sports science, but rather that it is expressive of certain meanings and values. The visual similarity of the contemporary athletic body and that of the comic book superhero suggests that both bodies carry a similar potential for narrative story-telling, and that their attraction is bound up with this narrative potential...
September 10, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27590144/how-much-care-is-enough-carer-s-guilt-and-bergsonian-time
#17
Will Johncock
Despite devoting their time to another person's needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the "enough" of anything, what is at stake is that thing's quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measure the role, concerns regarding whether enough care is being provided often focus on what constitutes enough time as a carer. In exploring this aspect of the carer's experience, two key parameters emerge; (1) guilt, and, (2) quantified time...
September 2, 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27461537/special-issue-of-health-care-analysis-translational-bodies-ethical-aspects-of-uses-of-human-biomaterials
#18
EDITORIAL
David R Lawrence, Catherine Rhodes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27453050/the-re-production-of-the-genetically-related-body-in-law-technology-and-culture-mitochondria-replacement-therapy
#19
Danielle Griffiths
Advances in medicine in the latter half of the twentieth century have dramatically altered human bodies, expanding choices around what we do with them and how they connect to other bodies. Nowhere is this more so than in the area of reproductive technologies (RTs). Reproductive medicine and the laws surrounding it in the UK have reconfigured traditional boundaries surrounding parenthood and the family. Yet culture and regulation surrounding RTs have combined to try to ensure that while traditional boundaries may be pushed, they are reconstructed in similar ways...
September 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26646672/implantable-smart-technologies-ist-defining-the-sting-in-data-and-device
#20
Gill Haddow, Shawn H E Harmon, Leah Gilman
In a world surrounded by smart objects from sensors to automated medical devices, the ubiquity of 'smart' seems matched only by its lack of clarity. In this article, we use our discussions with expert stakeholders working in areas of implantable medical devices such as cochlear implants, implantable cardiac defibrillators, deep brain stimulators and in vivo biosensors to interrogate the difference facets of smart in 'implantable smart technologies', considering also whether regulation needs to respond to the autonomy that such artefacts carry within them...
September 2016: Health Care Analysis: HCA: Journal of Health Philosophy and Policy
journal
journal
31955
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"