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Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30395248/effect-of-vocabulary-mapping-for-conditions-on-phenotype-cohorts
#1
George Hripcsak, Matthew E Levine, Ning Shang, Patrick B Ryan
Objective: To study the effect on patient cohorts of mapping condition (diagnosis) codes from source billing vocabularies to a clinical vocabulary. Materials and Methods: Nine International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD9-CM) concept sets were extracted from eMERGE network phenotypes, translated to Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms concept sets, and applied to patient data that were mapped from source ICD9-CM and ICD10-CM codes to Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine - Clinical Terms codes using Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI) Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) vocabulary mappings...
November 3, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30380061/a-systematic-assessment-of-the-availability-and-clinical-drug-information-coverage-of-machine-readable-clinical-drug-data-sources-for-building-knowledge-translation-products
#2
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 31, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30371862/amia-board-white-paper-amia-2017-core-competencies-for-applied-health-informatics-education-at-the-master-s-degree-level
#3
Annette L Valenta, Eta S Berner, Suzanne A Boren, Gloria J Deckard, Christina Eldredge, Douglas B Fridsma, Cynthia Gadd, Yang Gong, Todd Johnson, Josette Jones, E LaVerne Manos, Kirk T Phillips, Nancy K Roderer, Douglas Rosendale, Anne M Turner, Guenter Tusch, Jeffrey J Williamson, Stephen B Johnson
This White Paper presents the foundational domains with examples of key aspects of competencies (knowledge, skills, and attitudes) that are intended for curriculum development and accreditation quality assessment for graduate (master's level) education in applied health informatics. Through a deliberative process, the AMIA Accreditation Committee refined the work of a task force of the Health Informatics Accreditation Council, establishing 10 foundational domains with accompanying example statements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are components of competencies by which graduates from applied health informatics programs can be assessed for competence at the time of graduation...
October 26, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30358866/mobile-accessible-personal-health-records-increase-the-frequency-and-timeliness-of-phr-use-for-patients-with-diabetes
#4
Ilana Graetz, Jie Huang, Richard Brand, John Hsu, Mary E Reed
Personal health records (PHRs) offer patients a portal to view lab results, communicate with their doctors, and refill medications. Expanding PHR access to mobile devices could increase patients' engagement with their PHRs. We examined whether access to a mobile-optimized PHR changed the frequency and timeliness of PHR use among adult patients with diabetes in an integrated delivery system. Among patients originally using the PHR only by computer, PHR use frequency increased with mobile access. Non-White patients were more likely to view their lab results within 7 days if they had computer and mobile access compared with computer only; however, there were no statistically significant differences among White patients...
October 24, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30357344/assessment-of-ehealth-behaviors-in-national-surveys-a-systematic-review-of-instruments
#5
Y Alicia Hong, Jinmyoung Cho
Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of instruments used in national surveys of eHealth behaviors. Materials and Methods: Major databases and websites of federal agencies were searched with pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. National surveys with measures of eHealth behaviors were identified. The survey instruments were retrieved, and their measures of eHealth behaviors were categorized and critiqued. Results: We located 13 national surveys containing eHealth behavior assessment questions that were administered from 1999 to 2017...
October 23, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30346543/a-randomized-controlled-trial-to-improve-engagement-of-hospitalized-patients-with-their-patient-portals
#6
S Ryan Greysen, James D Harrison, Charles Rareshide, Yimdriuska Magan, Neil Seghal, Jaime Rosenthal, Ronald Jacolbia, Andrew D Auerbach
Objectives: To test a patient-centered, tablet-based bedside educational intervention in the hospital and to evaluate the efficacy of this intervention to increase patient engagement with their patient portals during hospitalization and after discharge. Materials and Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of adult patients admitted to the hospitalist service in one large, academic medical center. All participants were supplied with a tablet computer for 1 day during their inpatient stay and assistance with portal registration and initial login as needed...
October 19, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30321381/project-tycho-2-0-a-repository-to-improve-the-integration-and-reuse-of-data-for-global-population-health
#7
Willem G van Panhuis, Anne Cross, Donald S Burke
Objective: In 2013, we released Project Tycho, an open-access database comprising 3.6 million counts of infectious disease cases and deaths reported for over a century by public health surveillance in the United States. Our objective is to describe how Project Tycho version 1 (v1) data has been used to create new knowledge and technology and to present improvements made in the newly released version 2.0 (v2). Materials and Methods: We analyzed our user database and conducted online searches to analyze the use of Project Tycho v1 data...
October 15, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30295770/predicting-individual-physiologically-acceptable-states-at-discharge-from-a-pediatric-intensive-care-unit
#8
Cameron S Carlin, Long V Ho, David R Ledbetter, Melissa D Aczon, Randall C Wetzel
Objective: Quantify physiologically acceptable PICU-discharge vital signs and develop machine learning models to predict these values for individual patients throughout their PICU episode. Methods: EMR data from 7256 survivor PICU episodes (5632 patients) collected between 2009 and 2017 at Children's Hospital Los Angeles was analyzed. Each episode contained 375 variables representing physiology, labs, interventions, and drugs. Between medical and physical discharge, when clinicians determined the patient was ready for ICU discharge, they were assumed to be in a physiologically acceptable state space (PASS) for discharge...
October 6, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30272176/beyond-smartphones-and-sensors-choosing-appropriate-statistical-methods-for-the-analysis-of-longitudinal-data
#9
Ian Barnett, John Torous, Patrick Staples, Matcheri Keshavan, Jukka-Pekka Onnela
Objectives: As smartphones and sensors become more prominently used in mobile health, the methods used to analyze the resulting data must also be carefully considered. The advantages of smartphone-based studies, including large quantities of temporally dense longitudinally captured data, must be matched with the appropriate statistical methods in order draw valid conclusions. In this paper, we review and provide recommendations in 3 critical domains of analysis for these types of temporally dense longitudinal data and highlight how misleading results can arise from improper use of these methods...
September 28, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30247699/should-parents-see-their-teen-s-medical-record-asking-about-the-effect-on-adolescent-doctor-communication-changes-attitudes
#10
Jessica S Ancker, Marianne Sharko, Matthew Hong, Hannah Mitchell, Lauren Wilcox
Objective: Parents routinely access young children's medical records, but medical societies strongly recommend confidential care during adolescence, and most medical centers restrict parental records access during the teen years. We sought to assess public opinion about adolescent medical privacy. Materials and Methods: The Cornell National Social Survey (CNSS) is an annual nationwide public opinion survey. We added questions about a) whether parents should be able to see their 16-year-old child's medical record, and b) whether teens would avoid discussing sensitive issues (sex, alcohol) with doctors if parents could see the record...
September 20, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30380084/clinical-informatics-applications-of-medication-reconciliation-decision-support-systems-and-online-portal-patient-provider-communications
#11
Lucila Ohno-Machado
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30380083/the-therapy-is-making-me-sick-how-online-portal-communications-between-breast-cancer-patients-and-physicians-indicate-medication-discontinuation
#12
Zhijun Yin, Morgan Harrell, Jeremy L Warner, Qingxia Chen, Daniel Fabbri, Bradley A Malin
Objective: Online platforms have created a variety of opportunities for breast patients to discuss their hormonal therapy, a long-term adjuvant treatment to reduce the chance of breast cancer occurrence and mortality. The goal of this investigation is to ascertain the extent to which the messages breast cancer patients communicated through an online portal can indicate their potential for discontinuing hormonal therapy. Materials and Methods: We studied the de-identified electronic medical records of 1106 breast cancer patients who were prescribed hormonal therapy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center over a 12-year period...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30380082/machine-learning-for-psychiatric-patient-triaging-an-investigation-of-cascading-classifiers
#13
Vivek Kumar Singh, Utkarsh Shrivastava, Lina Bouayad, Balaji Padmanabhan, Anna Ialynytchev, Susan K Schultz
Objective: Develop an approach, One-class-at-a-time, for triaging psychiatric patients using machine learning on textual patient records. Our approach aims to automate the triaging process and reduce expert effort while providing high classification reliability. Materials and Methods: The One-class-at-a-time approach is a multistage cascading classification technique that achieves higher triage classification accuracy compared to traditional multiclass classifiers through 1) classifying one class at a time (or stage), and 2) identification and application of the highest accuracy classifier at each stage...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30371821/development-and-validation-of-the-pepper-framework-prenatal-exposure-pubmed-parser-with-applications-to-food-additives
#14
Mary Regina Boland, Aditya Kashyap, Jiadi Xiong, John Holmes, Scott Lorch
Background: Globally, 36% of deaths among children can be attributed to environmental factors. However, no comprehensive list of environmental exposures exists. We seek to address this gap by developing a literature-mining algorithm to catalog prenatal environmental exposures. Methods: We designed a framework called. PEPPER: Prenatal Exposure PubMed ParsER to a) catalog prenatal exposures studied in the literature and b) identify study type...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30357378/heterogeneous-network-embedding-for-identifying-symptom-candidate-genes
#15
Kuo Yang, Ning Wang, Guangming Liu, Ruyu Wang, Jian Yu, Runshun Zhang, Jianxin Chen, Xuezhong Zhou
Objective: Investigating the molecular mechanisms of symptoms is a vital task in precision medicine to refine disease taxonomy and improve the personalized management of chronic diseases. Although there are abundant experimental studies and computational efforts to obtain the candidate genes of diseases, the identification of symptom genes is rarely addressed. We curated a high-quality benchmark dataset of symptom-gene associations and proposed a heterogeneous network embedding for identifying symptom genes...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30329055/amia-s-code-of-professional-and-ethical-conduct-2018
#16
Carolyn Petersen, Eta S Berner, Peter J Embi, Kate Fultz Hollis, Kenneth W Goodman, Ross Koppel, Christoph U Lehmann, Harold Lehmann, Sarah A Maulden, Kyle A McGregor, Anthony Solomonides, Vignesh Subbian, Enrique Terrazas, Peter Winkelstein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30239810/efficacy-and-unintended-consequences-of-hard-stop-alerts-in-electronic-health-record-systems-a-systematic-review
#17
Emily M Powers, Richard N Shiffman, Edward R Melnick, Andrew Hickner, Mona Sharifi
Objective: Clinical decision support (CDS) hard-stop alerts-those in which the user is either prevented from taking an action altogether or allowed to proceed only with the external override of a third party-are increasingly common but can be problematic. To understand their appropriate application, we asked 3 key questions: (1) To what extent are hard-stop alerts effective in improving patient health and healthcare delivery outcomes? (2) What are the adverse events and unintended consequences of hard-stop alerts? (3) How do hard-stop alerts compare to soft-stop alerts? Methods and Materials: Studies evaluating computerized hard-stop alerts in healthcare settings were identified from biomedical and computer science databases, gray literature sites, reference lists, and reviews...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30239733/patient-and-healthcare-provider-views-on-a-patient-reported-outcomes-portal
#18
Robert M Cronin, Douglas Conway, David Condon, Rebecca N Jerome, Daniel W Byrne, Paul A Harris
Background: Over the past decade, public interest in managing health-related information for personal understanding and self-improvement has rapidly expanded. This study explored aspects of how patient-provided health information could be obtained through an electronic portal and presented to inform and engage patients while also providing information for healthcare providers. Methods: We invited participants using ResearchMatch from 2 cohorts: (1) self-reported healthy volunteers (no medical conditions) and (2) individuals with a self-reported diagnosis of anxiety and/or depression...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30189000/engaging-hospital-patients-in-the-medication-reconciliation-process-using-tablet-computers
#19
Jennifer E Prey, Fernanda Polubriaginof, Lisa V Grossman, Ruth Masterson Creber, Demetra Tsapepas, Rimma Perotte, Min Qian, Susan Restaino, Suzanne Bakken, George Hripcsak, Leigh Efird, Joseph Underwood, David K Vawdrey
Objective: Unintentional medication discrepancies contribute to preventable adverse drug events in patients. Patient engagement in medication safety beyond verbal participation in medication reconciliation is limited. We conducted a pilot study to determine whether patients' use of an electronic home medication review tool could improve medication safety during hospitalization. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized to use a tool before or after hospital admission medication reconciliation to review and modify their home medication list...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30137498/identification-of-validated-case-definitions-for-medical-conditions-used-in-primary-care-electronic-medical-record-databases-a-systematic-review
#20
Kerry A McBrien, Sepideh Souri, Nicola E Symonds, Azin Rouhi, Brendan C Lethebe, Tyler S Williamson, Stephanie Garies, Richard Birtwhistle, Hude Quan, Gabriel E Fabreau, Paul E Ronksley
Objectives: Data derived from primary care electronic medical records (EMRs) are being used for research and surveillance. Case definitions are required to identify patients with specific conditions in EMR data with a degree of accuracy. The purpose of this study is to identify and provide a summary of case definitions that have been validated in primary care EMR data. Materials and Methods: We searched MEDLINE and Embase (from inception to June 2016) to identify studies that describe case definitions for clinical conditions in EMR data and report on the performance metrics of these definitions...
November 1, 2018: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
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