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Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941515/advances-in-craniofacial-trauma
#1
EDITORIAL
Kris S Moe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941514/evidence-based-medicine-in-facial-trauma
#2
REVIEW
William M Dougherty, John Jared Christophel, Stephen S Park
This article provides the reader with a comprehensive review of high-level evidence-based medicine in facial trauma and highlights areas devoid of high-level evidence. The article is organized in the order one might approach a clinical problem: starting with the workup, followed by treatment considerations, operative decisions, and postoperative treatments. Individual injuries are discussed within each section, with an overview of the available high-level clinical evidence. This article not only provides a quick reference for the facial traumatologist, but also allows the reader to identify areas that lack high-level evidence, perhaps motivating future endeavors...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941513/posttraumatic-laser-treatment-of-soft-tissue-injury
#3
REVIEW
Prem B Tripathi, J Stuart Nelson, Brian J Wong
Laser treatment for posttraumatic injury offers the clinician the unique opportunity for early intervention in mediating early scar formation, or for reducing the appearance of scars after maturation. In this review, the authors focus on the mechanisms by which lasers exert their therapeutic effects, highlighting several popular lasers and dosimetry used, and underscoring the power of combined surgical scar revision in managing posttraumatic facial scars.
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941512/eyelid-and-periorbital-soft-tissue-trauma
#4
REVIEW
Audrey C Ko, Kellie R Satterfield, Bobby S Korn, Don O Kikkawa
Facial trauma often involves injuries to the eyelid and periorbital region. Management of these injuries can be challenging due to the involvement of multiple complex anatomic structures that are in close proximity. Restoration of normal anatomic relationships of the eyelids and periocular structures is essential for optimum functional and aesthetic outcome after trauma. This review provides an overview of the current literature involving soft tissue trauma of the eyelid and periorbital tissue, and highlights key steps in patient evaluation and management with various types of injuries...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941511/emergent-soft-tissue-repair-in-facial-trauma
#5
REVIEW
Melissa Marks, Derek Polecritti, Ronald Bergman, Cody A Koch
Emergency personnel, surgeons, and ancillary health care providers frequently encounter soft tissue injuries in facial trauma. Appropriate evaluation and management is essential to achieve optimal functional and aesthetic outcomes.
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941510/issues-in-pediatric-craniofacial-trauma
#6
REVIEW
Srinivasa R Chandra, Karen S Zemplenyi
Pediatric maxillofacial fractures are rare owing to anatomic differences between juvenile and adult skulls. Children's bone is less calcified, allowing for "greenstick fractures." The overall ratio of cranial to facial volume decreases with age. In children, tooth buds comprise the majority of mandibular volume. The most common pediatric craniomaxillofacial fractures for children ages 0 to 18 years old are mandible, nasal bone, and maxilla and zygoma. Growth potential must be considered when addressing pediatric trauma and often a less-is-more approach is best when considering open versus closed treatment...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941509/current-management-of-subcondylar-fractures-of-the-mandible-including-endoscopic-repair
#7
REVIEW
Alexis M Strohl, Robert M Kellman
Treatment of subcondylar fractures has been the subject of debate for many years. Options for treatment include physical therapy, elastic maxillomandibular fixation, and open repair. Proper imaging and clinical evaluation are imperative when deciding on the best management option. In the past, most subcondylar fractures were treated with a closed approach. Recent data support open repair, when feasible. Studies show increased interincisal opening, lateral excursion, and protrusion with less mandibular shortening, jaw deviation, and pain...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941508/updates-in-management-of-craniomaxillofacial-gunshot-wounds-and-reconstruction-of-the-mandible
#8
REVIEW
Baber Khatib, Savannah Gelesko, Melissa Amundson, Allen Cheng, Ashish Patel, Tuan Bui, Eric J Dierks, R Bryan Bell
This article includes updates in the management of mandibular trauma and reconstruction as they relate to maxillomandibular fixation screws, custom hardware, virtual surgical planning, and protocols for use of computer-aided surgery and navigation when managing composite defects from gunshot injuries to the face.
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941507/management-of-zygomaticomaxillary-complex-fractures
#9
REVIEW
E Bradley Strong, Celeste Gary
Zygomaticomaxillary fractures account for approximately 25% of all facial fractures. They can be grouped into high-velocity and low-velocity injuries. A complete head and neck examination is critical for accurate clinical diagnosis. A thin-cut axial CT scan with sagittal, coronal, and 3-D reconstruction is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. A thorough understanding of bony tetrapod anatomy and fracture mechanics is critical to treatment planning. Treatment options include closed and open reduction with internal fixation...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941506/correction-of-nasal-fractures
#10
REVIEW
G Nina Lu, Clinton D Humphrey, J David Kriet
Nasal fractures are the most frequently fractured facial bone from blunt facial trauma resulting in a significant number of patients seeking treatment. Proper evaluation and treatment in the acute setting can minimize secondary surgeries, lower overall health care costs, and increase patient satisfaction. Nasal fracture management, however, varies widely between surgeons. The open treatment of isolated nasal fractures is a particularly controversial subject. This review seeks to describe the existing literature in isolated nasal fracture management...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941505/advances-in-the-reconstruction-of-orbital-fractures
#11
REVIEW
Scott E Bevans, Kris S Moe
Orbital reconstruction is one of the most challenging tasks for surgeons who treat craniofacial trauma. Suboptimal outcomes carry a high level of morbidity, with functional, emotional, and aesthetic implications. However, advances in reconstruction techniques, including the use of orbital endoscopy, computer-guided navigation, and mirror image overlay techniques, have been shown to provide significant improvements in outcomes. This article provides practical advice for applying these techniques to orbital reconstruction following trauma...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941504/trauma-in-facial-plastic-surgery-frontal-sinus-fractures
#12
REVIEW
Irene A Kim, Kofi D Boahene, Patrick J Byrne
The optimal management of frontal sinus fractures remains controversial. Fortunately, the severity of these injuries has diminished with more stringent auto-safety regulations, changing the treatment paradigms used to repair these injuries. Appropriate patient selection and close follow-up may allow for conservative management strategies when dealing with frontal sinus fractures, largely replacing the more morbid and invasive techniques that have been the mainstay for years. Because acute and delayed sequelae can arise after the initial injury, patients should be thoroughly counseled about the importance of follow-up and the need to seek medical care if they develop any concerning signs or symptoms...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941503/management-of-high-velocity-injuries-of-the-head-and-neck
#13
REVIEW
Jacob S Majors, Joseph Brennan, G Richard Holt
Trauma centers must prepare to manage high-velocity injuries resulting from a mass casualty incidents as global terrorism becomes a greater concern and an increasing risk. The most recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have significantly improved understanding of battlefield trauma and how to appropriately address these injures. This article applies combat surgery experience to civilian situations, outlines the physiology and kinetics of high-velocity injuries, and reviews applicable triage and management strategies...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941502/neurosurgical-considerations-in-craniofacial-trauma
#14
REVIEW
Robert Glenn Oxford, Randall Matther Chesnut
Spinal and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) often accompany craniofacial trauma. Neurosurgical considerations can range from initial emergent surgery to conservative management of closed head injuries in patients with craniofacial injuries. This article discusses the most common disorders managed by neurosurgeons in the setting of craniofacial trauma, and reviews the usual timing and setting for various treatments that patients with TBI encounter throughout the course of treatment. It also highlights the consequences of TBI on the timing and planning of craniofacial repairs and the importance of multidisciplinary cooperation to provide comprehensive care to survivors of trauma...
November 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676170/in-pursuit-of-perfection-the-art-of-facial-restoration
#15
EDITORIAL
James B Lucas
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676169/scar-revision-and-recontouring-post-mohs-surgery
#16
REVIEW
Eric W Cerrati, J Regan Thomas
Following Mohs reconstruction, several options are available to improve the appearance of the resulting scars. It is critical that the patient has realistic goals before beginning any treatment because scars can be improved but never erased. The surgical and nonsurgical options aim to replace pre-existing scars with ones that are less conspicuous. This article addresses the different available options (listed in order of invasiveness) for improving scarring following Mohs reconstruction.
August 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676168/reconstruction-of-cheek-defects-secondary-to-mohs-microsurgery-or-wide-local-excision
#17
REVIEW
John E Hanks, Jeffrey S Moyer, Michael J Brenner
Successful reconstruction of the cheek following excision for cutaneous malignancy requires careful consideration of defect location, size, and depth in relation to the anatomic properties of the affected cheek unit. Various reconstructive options are available to the surgeon, ranging from simple excisions to complex cervicofacial advancements to meet the needs for functional and aesthetically pleasing reconstructive outcomes. The surgeon must prevent distortion of mobile structures, such as the eyelid, nose, and lips; respect aesthetic subunits; and avoid blunting natural creases...
August 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676167/reconstruction-of-mohs-defects-of-the-lips-and-chin
#18
REVIEW
Yuna C Larrabee, Jeffrey S Moyer
Reconstruction of defects of the lips after Mohs micrographic surgery should encompass functional and aesthetic concerns. The lower lip and chin compose two-thirds of the lower portion of the face. The focus of this article is local tissue transfer for primarily cutaneous defects after Mohs surgery. Various flaps exist for repair. For small defects, elliptical excision with primary closure is a viable option. During reconstruction of the lip, all of the involved layers need to be addressed, including mucosa, muscle, and the vermillion or cutaneous lip...
August 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676166/reconstruction-of-cutaneous-nasal-defects
#19
REVIEW
Gregory S Dibelius, Dean M Toriumi
Mohs micrographic surgery has become the standard of care for the treatment of cutaneous malignancies. Reconstructing cutaneous defects of the nose can be challenging, as form and function must be respected to the greatest extent possible. A wide range of reconstructive techniques are used. Secondary intent, primary closure, skin grafts, local flaps, and the interpolated workhorse flaps represent the spectrum of options, each with specific advantages and disadvantages. Vigilant postoperative care, including judicious use of adjunctive procedures, can improve outcomes...
August 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676165/repair-of-auricular-defects
#20
REVIEW
Deborah Watson, Avram Hecht
Repairing defects of the auricle requires an appreciation of the underlying 3-dimensional framework, the flexible properties of the cartilages, and the healing contractile tendencies of the surrounding soft tissue. In the analysis of auricular defects and planning of their reconstruction, it is helpful to divide the auricle into subunits for which different techniques may offer better functional and aesthetic outcomes. This article reviews many of the reconstructive options for defects of the various auricular subunits...
August 2017: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
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