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Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636155/controversies-in-facial-plastic-surgery
#1
EDITORIAL
Fred G Fedok, Robert M Kellman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636154/evaluating-new-technology
#2
REVIEW
Paul J Carniol, Ryan N Heffelfinger, Lisa D Grunebaum
There are multiple complex issues to consider when evaluating any new technology. First evaluate the efficacy of the device. Then considering your patient population decide whether this technology brings an added benefit to your patients. If it meets these 2 criteria, then proceed to the financial analysis of acquiring this technology. The complete financial analysis has several important components that include but are not limited to cost, value, alternatives, return on investment, and associated marketing expense...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636153/orbital-fractures
#3
REVIEW
Kris S Moe, Andrew H Murr, Sara Tullis Wester
Anatomic, rather than volumetric, reconstruction leads to improved outcomes in orbital reconstruction. Endoscopic visualization improves lighting and magnification of the surgical site and allows the entire operative team to understand and participate in the procedure. Mirror-image overlay display with navigation-guided surgery allows in situ fine adjustment of the implant contours to match the contralateral uninjured orbit. Precise exophthalmometry is important before, during, and after surgery to provide optimal surgical results...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636152/injectable-fillers-panel-discussion-controversies-and-techniques
#4
REVIEW
Theda C Kontis, Lisa Bunin, Rebecca Fitzgerald
Injectable products are now being designed to treat specific areas of the face, including the lower lid/cheek region, the midface, and circumoral rhytids. Expert injectors from 3 core disciplines (facial plastic surgery, oculoplastic surgery, and dermatology) were asked to discuss their approaches to the midface, lower lid, and cheek region and their opinions about using cannulas versus needles. The authors describe their techniques for avoiding and managing filler complications. They give insight into how their techniques have changed over the past few years and their use of new products that have been developed...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636151/grafting-techniques-in-primary-and-revision-rhinoplasty
#5
REVIEW
Brian J F Wong, Oren Friedman, Grant S Hamilton
With the adoption of open structure techniques, rhinoplasty has become more reliant on the use of structural grafts to resist change that occurs over time owing to both gravity and the aging process. As surgical procedures have become more technically complex, the type of grafts use for both primary and secondary rhinoplasty have undergone significant evolution. This article provides a case approach focused on the use of structural grafting in rhinoplasty.
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636150/lip-augmentation
#6
REVIEW
Louis M DeJoseph, Anurag Agarwal, Timothy M Greco
This article examines 6 questions about lip augmentation answered by 3 experts in their field of facial plastic surgery. The topics covered include high-yield areas such as injection, surgical enhancement, rhytid resurfacing, implants, complications, and technique changes over the years. All the authors answered these questions in a "How I do it" manner to provide the reader with a true understanding of their thoughts and techniques. This article provides a practical resource to all physicians and practitioners performing lip augmentation on some of the most common questions and issues...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636149/management-of-the-prominent-ear
#7
REVIEW
Andres Gantous, Abel-Jan Tasman, Jose Carlos Neves
This article incorporates the opinions and preferred surgical options in managing patients of 3 prominent facial plastic surgeons who have large otoplasty practices. Six different questions covering the management of prominent ears are answered by the 3 practitioners. Nonsurgical options for the treatment of prominent ears are discussed. The role of cartilage-cutting and cartilage-sparing techniques as well as individual preferred otoplasty techniques are thoroughly covered. Postoperative management of these patients is presented by the individual surgeons...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636148/facial-paralysis-discussion-and-debate
#8
REVIEW
Travis T Tollefson, Tessa A Hadlock, Jessyka G Lighthall
This article examines 6 questions about facial paralysis answered by 3 experts in their field of facial plastic surgery. The topics covered include routine assessment, neuromuscular training, nonsurgical management, and the future of this field. All the authors answered these questions in a "How I do it" manner to provide the reader with a true understanding of their thoughts and techniques. This article provides a practical resource to all physicians and practitioners treating patients with facial paralysis on some of the most common questions and issues...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636147/the-superficial-musculoaponeurotic-system-and-other-considerations-in-rejuvenation-of-the-lower-face-and-neck
#9
REVIEW
William H Truswell, Harrison C Putman, Stephen W Perkins, Nathan Johnson
This article addresses several facelift challenges involving anatomic conditions, including platysma banding, endomorphic facial habitus, and midface hypoplasia. In addition, patient counseling and conveying realistic expectations about limitations of facelift alone, with and without adjunctive procedures, are presented. In addition, a few technical modifications of the facelift procedure contributing to more uniform success and longevity are discussed.
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636146/radiofrequency-technology-in-face-and-neck-rejuvenation
#10
REVIEW
Richard D Gentile, Brian M Kinney, Neil S Sadick
Three doctors discuss the current issues and controversies involving the use of radiofrequency and energy-based devices for skin tightening, facial contouring, and other indications. The use of transcutaneous monopolar-, bipolar-, multipolar-, subcutaneous-, and microneedle-based delivery methods are discussed. The controversies involved in the various devices are discussed.
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636145/contemporary-laser-and-light-based-rejuvenation-techniques
#11
REVIEW
Mark Hamilton, Andrew Campbell, J David Holcomb
Laser and light skin rejuvenation have changed dramatically in the last 10 years. CO2 and erbium:YAG remain the main wavelengths, but fractional, nonablative, and combination devices have been added. For those patients with lighter skin types and extensive photodamage and rhytids, full-field ablative laser resurfacing remains the procedure of choice. For those seeking less downtime and risks, fractional devices offer an excellent and growing alternative, although multiple treatments may be required for optimal results...
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29636144/facial-plastic-surgery-controversies-keloids
#12
REVIEW
Kofi Boahene, Anthony E Brissett, Lamont R Jones
There are more than 11 million people in the world affected with keloids. Nevertheless, there is a lack of agreement in keloid management. Moreover, keloid research has left gaps in the understanding of its pathogenesis. Six questions are answered by 3 clinical scientists in an attempt to address common keloid controversies.
May 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153194/cosmetic-and-reconstructive-surgery-of-congenital-ear-deformities
#13
EDITORIAL
Scott Stephan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153193/auricular-prostheses-in-microtia
#14
REVIEW
Philippe A Federspil
The progress made in the development of the silicones and percutaneous titanium implants allow for rehabilitation of patients with microtia with an inconspicuous auricular prosthesis. The art of making the prosthesis by the dedicated anaplastologist is the key for the success of this approach. Most patients with microtia desire camouflage. The greatest advantage of the auricular prosthesis is that it can be manufactured as a mirrored replica of the opposite side. The outcome is predictable. Computer science with virtual planning and rapid prototyping is about to revolutionize the process of prosthetic auricular rehabilitation...
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153192/surgical-otoplasty-an-evidence-based-approach-to-prominent-ears-correction
#15
REVIEW
Kenneth J Stewart, Luca Lancerotto
Otoplasty is one of the first procedures learned during residency. A myriad of surgical techniques and nuances exist. Many have merit, some are ineffective, some destructive, and some frankly fanciful. Adopting an effective and safe technique should be based on proven efficacy and effectiveness to avoid early disappointments. We present a review of traditional otoplasty techniques and more recent innovations. Their pros and cons are discussed in view of the relative risks/benefits balance. Recurrence rates are low for most techniques...
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153191/atresiaplasty-in-congenital-aural-atresia-what-the-facial-plastic-surgeon-needs-to-know
#16
REVIEW
Douglas S Ruhl, Bradley W Kesser
Patients with microtia and congenital aural atresia should have a comprehensive hearing assessment early in life. Options for hearing habilitation should be presented, and children with bilateral aural atresia should be fitted with a bone conducting hearing device to support normal speech and language development. If atresia surgery is pursued, the microtia surgeon must be aware of certain principles. This article presents recommendations on options for potentially improving hearing in children with congenital aural atresia: assessing surgical candidacy; chronology and timing of surgeries; functional importance of certain ear structures; and understanding the possible locations of an aberrant facial nerve to avoid injury in these patients...
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153190/auricular-reconstruction-using-porous-polyethylene-implant-technique
#17
REVIEW
Scott Stephan, John Reinisch
Alloplast-based ear reconstruction has become more popular over the years because it offers many advantages compared with the traditional staged autologous costal cartilage approach. Advantages include earlier reconstruction in the setting of microtia, fewer procedures, less donor site morbidity, shorter surgeon learning curve, and improved consistency in the final aesthetic result. Although other implantable materials have been used in auricular reconstruction with variable success, porous high-density polyethylene frameworks combined with recent advances in the creation of the soft tissue coverage have significantly improved outcomes with minimal complications and long-term viability...
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153189/pediatric-microtia-reconstruction-with-autologous-rib-personal-experience-and-technique-with-1000-pediatric-patients-with-microtia
#18
REVIEW
Arturo Bonilla
Reconstruction of the microtic ear is one of the most challenging, yet gratifying surgical experiences. Careful planning, attention to detail, and conservative tissue management are necessary for excellent results. Technologies continue to evolve; with the advancement of cartilage tissue engineering, the future of ear reconstruction is very promising.
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153188/autologous-rib-microtia-construction-nagata-technique
#19
REVIEW
Akira Yamada
Nagata technique becomes most popular method of autologous rib microtia construction. To achieve successful outcome, 3 keys must be perfect: skin envelope, 3D cartilage framework, and proper location of the construct. The first step of the surgery is to identify "auricular rectangle." Relationship between the auricular rectangle and the vestige will determine if the vestige is usable for surgery. Rib cartilage must be harvested without perichondrium to prevent chest deformity. Lobule split technique is the hallmark of the Nagata technique, which allows skin envelope expansion, and allows deeper conchal cavity...
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153187/otoplasty-for-congenital-auricular-malformations
#20
REVIEW
Jiahui Lin, Anthony P Sclafani
Among the less common congenital auricular anomalies are cryptotia, Stahl ear, constricted ear, and macrotia. The vast majority of these occur spontaneously without accompanying syndromes or other deformities. This article provides a comprehensive overview of these anomalies, as well as common techniques to correct these anomalies.
February 2018: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
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