Read by QxMD icon Read

Chromosome Research

Crislaine Xavier, Rógean Vinícius Santos Soares, Igor Costa Amorim, Diogo Cavalcanti Cabral-de-Mello, Rita de Cássia de Moura
Euchroma Dejean, 1833 (Buprestidae: Coleoptera) is a monotypic genus comprising the species Euchroma gigantea, with populations presenting a degree of karyotypic variation/polymorphism rarely found within a single taxonomic (specific) unit, as well as drastically incompatible meiotic configurations in populations from extremes of the species range. To better understand the complex karyotypic evolution of E. gigantea, the karyotypes of specimens from five populations in Brazil were investigated using molecular cytogenetics and phylogenetic approaches...
March 9, 2018: Chromosome Research
Gennadi V Glinsky
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake in publishing the panel C for Figures 3, 5 and 6.
March 3, 2018: Chromosome Research
Peter A Larsen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 28, 2018: Chromosome Research
Peter A Larsen, Kelsie E Hunnicutt, Roxanne J Larsen, Anne D Yoder, Ann M Saunders
Alu elements are a highly successful family of primate-specific retrotransposons that have fundamentally shaped primate evolution, including the evolution of our own species. Alus play critical roles in the formation of neurological networks and the epigenetic regulation of biochemical processes throughout the central nervous system (CNS), and thus are hypothesized to have contributed to the origin of human cognition. Despite the benefits that Alus provide, deleterious Alu activity is associated with a number of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders...
February 19, 2018: Chromosome Research
Elisa Orecchini, Loredana Frassinelli, Silvia Galardi, Silvia Anna Ciafrè, Alessandro Michienzi
Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposons represent the only functional family of autonomous transposable elements in humans and formed 17% of our genome. Even though most of the human L1 sequences are inactive, a limited number of copies per individual retain the ability to mobilize by a process termed retrotransposition. The ongoing L1 retrotransposition may result in insertional mutagenesis that could lead to negative consequences such as genetic disease and cancer. For this reason, cells have evolved several mechanisms of defense to restrict L1 activity...
February 2, 2018: Chromosome Research
Roy N Platt, Michael W Vandewege, David A Ray
Transposable elements (TEs) are genetic elements with the ability to mobilize and replicate themselves in a genome. Mammalian genomes are dominated by TEs, which can reach copy numbers in the hundreds of thousands. As a result, TEs have had significant impacts on mammalian evolution. Here we summarize the current understanding of TE content in mammal genomes and find that, with a few exceptions, most fall within a predictable range of observations. First, one third to one half of the genome is derived from TEs...
February 1, 2018: Chromosome Research
Gennadi V Glinsky
Transposable elements have made major evolutionary impacts on creation of primate-specific and human-specific genomic regulatory loci and species-specific genomic regulatory networks (GRNs). Molecular and genetic definitions of human-specific changes to GRNs contributing to development of unique to human phenotypes remain a highly significant challenge. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of diverse families of human-specific genomic regulatory loci (HSGRL) identified topologically associating domains (TADs) that are significantly enriched for HSGRL and designated rapidly evolving in human TADs...
January 15, 2018: Chromosome Research
Savannah J Klein, Rachel J O'Neill
Although it was nearly 70 years ago when transposable elements (TEs) were first discovered "jumping" from one genomic location to another, TEs are now recognized as contributors to genomic innovations as well as genome instability across a wide variety of species. In this review, we illustrate the ways in which active TEs, specifically retroelements, can create novel chromosome rearrangements and impact gene expression, leading to disease in some cases and species-specific diversity in others. We explore the ways in which eukaryotic genomes have evolved defense mechanisms to temper TE activity and the ways in which TEs continue to influence genome structure despite being rendered transpositionally inactive...
January 13, 2018: Chromosome Research
Gauthier Dobigny, Terence J Robinson, Frederic Veyrunes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 20, 2017: Chromosome Research
Shih-Hsuan Tseng, Shu-Fen Peng, Ya-Ming Cheng
The maize B chromosome typically undergoes nondisjunction during the second microspore division. For normal A chromosomes, the r-X1 deficiency in maize can induce nondisjunction during the second megaspore and first microspore divisions. However, it is not known whether the r-X1 deficiency also induces nondisjunction of the maize B chromosome during these cell divisions. To answer this question, chromosome numbers were determined in the progeny of r-X1/R-r female parents carrying two B chromosomes. Some of the r-X1-lacking progeny (21...
November 20, 2017: Chromosome Research
José Ignacio Márquez-Corro, Marcial Escudero, Modesto Luceño
Despite most of the cytogenetic research is focused on monocentric chromosomes, chromosomes with kinetochoric activity localized in a single centromere, several studies have been centered on holocentric chromosomes which have diffuse kinetochoric activity along the chromosomes. The eukaryotic organisms that present this type of chromosomes have been relatively understudied despite they constitute rather diversified species lineages. On the one hand, holocentric chromosomes may present intrinsic benefits (chromosome mutations such as fissions and fusions are potentially neutral in holocentrics)...
October 17, 2017: Chromosome Research
Cibele Gomes de Sotero-Caio, Diogo Cavalcanti Cabral-de-Mello, Merilane da Silva Calixto, Guilherme Targino Valente, Cesar Martins, Vilma Loreto, Maria José de Souza, Neide Santos
Despite their ubiquitous incidence, little is known about the chromosomal distribution of long interspersed elements (LINEs) in mammalian genomes. Phyllostomid bats, characterized by lineages with distinct trends of chromosomal evolution coupled with remarkable ecological and taxonomic diversity, represent good models to understand how these repetitive sequences contribute to the evolution of genome architecture and its link to lineage diversification. To test the hypothesis that LINE-1 sequences were important modifiers of bat genome architecture, we characterized the distribution of LINE-1-derived sequences on genomes of 13 phyllostomid species within a phylogenetic framework...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Hainan Zhao, Zixian Zeng, Dal-Hoe Koo, Bikram S Gill, James A Birchler, Jiming Jiang
Centromeres can arise de novo from non-centromeric regions, which are often called "neocentromeres." Neocentromere formation provides the best evidence for the concept that centromere function is not determined by the underlying DNA sequences, but controlled by poorly understood epigenetic mechanisms. Numerous neocentromeres have been reported in several plant and animal species. However, it has been elusive how and why a specific chromosomal region is chosen to be a new centromere during the neocentromere activation events...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Anura Shodhan, Maria Novatchkova, Josef Loidl
Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Most DSBs are converted into nonreciprocal exchanges (gene conversions) or crossovers (COs) between sister chromatids. Only a minority of DSBs are processed toward interhomolog COs, the precursors of the chiasmata that connect homologous chromosomes. Dmc1, the meiosis-specific paralog of the universal recombination protein Rad51, is required for interhomolog COs; in its absence, univalents are primarily formed. Here, we report a ciliate-specific novel meiotic gene, BIME2, which also promotes interhomolog crossing over...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Benjamin M Stormo, Donald T Fox
In this era of high-resolution mapping of chromosome territories, topological interactions, and chromatin states, it is increasingly appreciated that the positioning of chromosomes and their interactions within the nucleus is critical for cellular function. Due to their large size and distinctive structure, polytene chromosomes have contributed a wealth of knowledge regarding chromosome regulation. In this review, we discuss the diversity of polytene chromosomes in nature and in disease, examine the recurring structural features of polytene chromosomes in terms of what they reveal about chromosome biology, and discuss recent advances regarding how polytene chromosomes are assembled and disassembled...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Bianca O Carmello, Rafael L B Coan, Adauto L Cardoso, Erica Ramos, Bruno E A Fantinatti, Diego F Marques, Rogério A Oliveira, Guilherme T Valente, Cesar Martins
B chromosomes are dispensable elements observed in many eukaryotic species, including the African cichlid Astatotilapia latifasciata, which might have one or two B chromosomes. Although there have been many studies focused on the biology of these chromosomes, questions about the evolution, maintenance, and potential effects of these chromosomes remain. Here, we identified a variant form of the hnRNP Q-like gene inserted into the B chromosome of A. latifasciata that is characterized by a high copy number and intron-less structure...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Concetta Federico, Anna Maria Pappalardo, Venera Ferrito, Sabrina Tosi, Salvatore Saccone
Chromosomal rearrangements in humans are largely related to pathological conditions, and phenotypic effects are also linked to alterations in the expression profile following nuclear relocation of genes between functionally different compartments, generally occupying the periphery or the inner part of the cell nuclei. On the other hand, during evolution, chromosomal rearrangements may occur apparently without damaging phenotypic effects and are visible in currently phylogenetically related species. To increase our insight into chromosomal reorganisation in the cell nucleus, we analysed 18 chromosomal regions endowed with different genomic properties in cell lines derived from eight primate species covering the entire evolutionary tree...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Kohei Nishimura, Tatsuo Fukagawa
Generation of cells with a loss-of-function mutation in a gene (knockout cells) is a valuable technique for studying the function of a given gene product. However, if the product of the target gene is essential for cell viability, conditional knockout cell lines must be generated. Recently, as gene editing technology using CRISPR/Cas9 has developed, it has become possible to produce conditional knockout cell lines using this technique. However, to obtain final conditional knockout cell lines, it is necessary to perform several experiments with multiple complicated steps...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Martina Dalíková, Magda Zrzavá, Svatava Kubíčková, František Marec
The W chromosome of most lepidopteran species represents the largest heterochromatin entity in the female genome. Although satellite DNA is a typical component of constitutive heterochromatin, there are only a few known satellite DNAs (satDNAs) located on the W chromosome in moths and butterflies. In this study, we isolated and characterized new satDNA (PiSAT1) from microdissected W chromosomes of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Even though the PiSAT1 is mainly localized near the female-specific segment of the W chromosome, short arrays of this satDNA also occur on autosomes and/or the Z chromosome...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Emmanuelle Deniaud, Charlene Lemaître, Shelagh Boyle, Wendy A Bickmore
In the premature ageing disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), the underlying genetic defect in the lamin A gene leads to accumulation at the nuclear lamina of progerin-a mutant form of lamin A that cannot be correctly processed. This has been reported to result in defects in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair, leading to the hypothesis that, as in normal ageing and in other progeroid syndromes caused by mutation of genes of the DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways, increased DNA damage may be responsible for the premature ageing phenotypes in HGPS patients...
October 2017: Chromosome Research
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"