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Trends in Microbiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216294/spatial-and-temporal-control-of-evolution-through-replication-transcription-conflicts
#1
REVIEW
Houra Merrikh
Evolution could potentially be accelerated if an organism could selectively increase the mutation rate of specific genes that are actively under positive selection. Recently, a mechanism that cells can use to target rapid evolution to specific genes was discovered. This mechanism is driven by gene orientation-dependent encounters between DNA replication and transcription machineries. These encounters increase mutagenesis in lagging-strand genes, where replication-transcription conflicts are severe. Due to the orientation and transcription-dependent nature of this process, conflict-driven mutagenesis can be used by cells to spatially (gene-specifically) and temporally (only upon transcription induction) regulate the rate of gene evolution...
February 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216293/the-secrets-of-acinetobacter-secretion
#2
REVIEW
Brent S Weber, Rachel L Kinsella, Christian M Harding, Mario F Feldman
Infections caused by the bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are a mounting concern for healthcare practitioners as widespread antibiotic resistance continues to limit therapeutic treatment options. The biological processes used by A. baumannii to cause disease are not well defined, but recent research has indicated that secreted proteins may play a major role. A variety of mechanisms have now been shown to contribute to protein secretion by A. baumannii and other pathogenic species of Acinetobacter, including a type II secretion system (T2SS), a type VI secretion system (T6SS), autotransporter, and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs)...
February 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216292/evolutionary-constraints-shaping-streptococcus-pyogenes-host-interactions
#3
REVIEW
Reid V Wilkening, Michael J Federle
Research on the Gram-positive human-restricted pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) has long focused on invasive illness, the most severe manifestations of GAS infection. Recent advances in descriptions of molecular mechanisms of GAS virulence, coupled with massive sequencing efforts to isolate genomes, have allowed the field to better understand the molecular and evolutionary changes leading to pandemic strains. These findings suggest that it is necessary to rethink the dogma involving GAS pathogenesis, and that the most productive avenues for research going forward may be investigations into GAS in its 'normal' habitat, the nasopharynx, and its ability to either live with its host in an asymptomatic lifestyle or as an agent of superficial infections...
February 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28209400/multidrug-resistant-enterococcal-infections-new-compounds-novel-antimicrobial-therapies
#4
REVIEW
Roel M van Harten, Rob J L Willems, Nathaniel I Martin, Antoni P A Hendrickx
Over the past two decades infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have escalated world-wide, affecting patient morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Among these bacteria, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis represent opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that cause difficult-to-treat infections because of intrinsic and acquired resistance to a plethora of antibiotics. In recent years, a number of novel antimicrobial compound classes have been discovered and developed that target Gram-positive bacteria, including E...
February 13, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190635/langerhans-cells-the-yin-and-yang-of-hiv-restriction-and-transmission
#5
Luzia Mayr, Bin Su, Christiane Moog
Langerhans cells are specialized sentinels present in the epidermis expressing Langerin, a specific C-type lectin receptor involved in HIV capture and destruction. Recently, the specific mechanism leading to this HIV restriction was discovered. Nevertheless, Langerhans cells can be infected and the way HIV escapes this restriction needs to be unraveled.
February 9, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28189381/rna-chaperones-step-out-of-hfq-s-shadow
#6
Laetitia Attaiech, J N Mark Glover, Xavier Charpentier
The stability and function of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) often require a specialized RNA-binding protein called an RNA chaperone. Recent findings show that proteins containing a ProQ/FinO domain constitute a new class of RNA chaperones that could play key roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation throughout bacterial species.
February 8, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188076/cultivation-free-raman-spectroscopic-investigations-of-bacteria
#7
REVIEW
Björn Lorenz, Christina Wichmann, Stephan Stöckel, Petra Rösch, Jürgen Popp
Raman spectroscopy is currently advertised as a hot and ambitious technology that has all of the features needed to characterize and identify bacteria. Raman spectroscopy is rapid, easy to use, noninvasive, and it could complement established microbiological and biomolecular methods in the near future. To bring this vision closer to reality, ongoing research is being conducted on spectral fingerprinting. This can yield a wealth of information, from even single bacteria from various habitats which can be further improved by combining Raman spectroscopy with methods such as stable isotope probing to elucidate microbial interactions...
February 7, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139375/transcriptional-regulation-of-antiviral-interferon-stimulated-genes
#8
REVIEW
Wenshi Wang, Lei Xu, Junhong Su, Maikel P Peppelenbosch, Qiuwei Pan
Interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are a group of gene products that coordinately combat pathogen invasions, in particular viral infections. Transcription of ISGs occurs rapidly upon pathogen invasion, and this is classically provoked via activation of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway, mainly by interferons (IFNs). However, a plethora of recent studies have reported a variety of non-canonical mechanisms regulating ISG transcription. These new studies are extremely important for understanding the quantitative and temporal differences in ISG transcription under specific circumstances...
January 27, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139374/a-new-way-to-beat-intestinal-pathogens
#9
Corrella S Detweiler
In the gastrointestinal tract, the tug of war for iron may provide a new way to vaccinate. Recent work shows that immunizing mice with siderophores (small molecules that microbes produce to capture iron) foils pathogen colonization and may instead allow a commensal to expand.
January 27, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108182/marine-bacterioplankton-seasonal-succession-dynamics
#10
REVIEW
Carina Bunse, Jarone Pinhassi
Bacterioplankton (bacteria and archaea) are indispensable regulators of global element cycles owing to their unique ability to decompose and remineralize dissolved organic matter. These microorganisms in surface waters worldwide exhibit pronounced seasonal succession patterns, governed by physicochemical factors (e.g., light, climate, and nutrient loading) that are determined by latitude and distance to shore. Moreover, we emphasize that the effects of large-scale factors are modulated regionally, and over shorter timespans (days to weeks), by biological interactions including molecule exchanges, viral lysis, and grazing...
January 17, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28110800/resource-reallocation-in-bacteria-by-reengineering-the-gene-expression-machinery
#11
REVIEW
Hidde de Jong, Johannes Geiselmann, Delphine Ropers
Bacteria have evolved complex regulatory networks to control the activity of transcription and translation, and thus the growth rate, over a range of environmental conditions. Reengineering RNA polymerase and ribosomes allows modifying naturally evolved regulatory networks and thereby profoundly reorganizing the manner in which bacteria allocate resources to different cellular functions. This opens new opportunities for our fundamental understanding of microbial physiology and for a variety of applications...
January 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28094093/achiralpentagonalpolyhedralframework-forcharacterizingviruscapsidstructures
#12
REVIEW
Aditya Raguram, V Sasisekharan, Ram Sasisekharan
Recent developments of rational strategies for the design of antiviral therapies, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), have naturally relied extensively on available viral structural information. As new strategies continue to be developed, it is equally important to continue to refine our understanding and interpretation of viral structural data. There are known limitations to the traditional (Caspar-Klug) theory for describing virus capsid structures that involves subdividing a capsid into triangular subunits...
January 13, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28094092/step-by-step-cell-by-cell-quantification-of-the-bacterial-cell-cycle
#13
REVIEW
Matteo Osella, Sander J Tans, Marco Cosentino Lagomarsino
The Escherichia coli cell cycle is a classic, but we are still missing some of its essential aspects. The reason is that our knowledge is mostly based on population data, and our grasp of the behavior of single cells is still very limited. Today, new dynamic single-cell data promise to overcome this barrier. Existing data from single cells have already led to findings and hypotheses that challenge standard views, and have raised new questions. Here, we review these recent developments and propose that a systematic exploration of the correlation patterns between 'cell-cycle intervals' defined by key molecular events measured in many single cells could lead to a quantitative characterization of the cell cycle in terms of inherent stochasticity and homeostatic controls...
January 13, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28094091/can-maldi-tof-mass-spectrometry-reasonably-type-bacteria
#14
REVIEW
Marlène Sauget, Benoît Valot, Xavier Bertrand, Didier Hocquet
Bacterial typing is crucial to tackle the spread of bacterial pathogens but current methods are time-consuming and costly. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been recently integrated into the microbiology laboratory workflow for a quick and low-cost microbial species identification. Independent research groups have successfully redirected the original function of this technology from their primary purpose to discriminate subgroups within pathogen species...
January 13, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089288/the-role-of-reactive-oxygen-species-in-antibiotic-mediated-killing-of-bacteria
#15
REVIEW
Heleen Van Acker, Tom Coenye
Recently, it was proposed that there is a common mechanism behind the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the involvement of ROS in antibiotic-mediated killing has become the subject of much debate. In the present review, we provide an overview of the data supporting the ROS hypothesis; we also present data that explain the contradictory results often obtained when studying antibiotic-induced ROS production. For this latter aspect we will focus on the importance of taking the experimental setup into consideration and on the importance of some technical aspects of the assays typically used...
January 12, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089325/ecology-of-the-oral-microbiome-beyond-bacteria
#16
REVIEW
Jonathon L Baker, Batbileg Bor, Melissa Agnello, Wenyuan Shi, Xuesong He
Although great strides have been made in understanding the complex bacterial community inhabiting the human oral cavity, for a variety of (mainly technical) reasons the ecological contributions of oral fungi, viruses, phages, and the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) group of ultrasmall bacteria have remained understudied. Several recent reports have illustrated the diversity and importance of these organisms in the oral cavity, while TM7x and Candida albicans have served as crucial paradigms for CPR species and oral fungi, respectively...
January 11, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089324/the-peculiar-functions-of-the-bacterial-extracellular-matrix
#17
REVIEW
Anna Dragoš, Ákos T Kovács
A biofilm is a common life form where bacterial cells crowd together surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM). Traditionally, the ECM is considered as a structural material that glues and shields the biofilm cells. Here we describe alternative functions of the ECM, highlighting how it benefits microbes beyond the biofilms. Next to protecting free-living cells, the ECM participates in signaling, migration, and genetic exchange either being freely shared with other species or being exclusive to siblings. Considering the structural and recently discovered functions of the ECM, we also attempt to revise its role in sociomicrobiology...
January 11, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057411/helicobacter-pylori-a-paradigm-pathogen-for-subverting-host-cell-signal-transmission
#18
REVIEW
Michael Naumann, Olga Sokolova, Nicole Tegtmeyer, Steffen Backert
Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa in the human stomach and represents a major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the complex impact of H. pylori on manipulating host signalling networks, that is, by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI)-encoded type IV secretion system (T4SS). We show that H. pylori infections reflect a paradigm for interspecies contact-dependent molecular communication, which includes the disruption of cell-cell junctions and cytoskeletal rearrangements, as well as proinflammatory, cell cycle-related, proliferative, antiapoptotic, and DNA damage responses...
January 2, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28038926/the-ecological-role-of-volatile-and-soluble-secondary-metabolites-produced-by-soil-bacteria
#19
REVIEW
Olaf Tyc, Chunxu Song, Jeroen S Dickschat, Michiel Vos, Paolina Garbeva
The rich diversity of secondary metabolites produced by soil bacteria has been appreciated for over a century, and advances in chemical analysis and genome sequencing continue to greatly advance our understanding of this biochemical complexity. However, we are just at the beginning of understanding the physicochemical properties of bacterial metabolites, the factors that govern their production and ecological roles. Interspecific interactions and competitor sensing are among the main biotic factors affecting the production of bacterial secondary metabolites...
December 27, 2016: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28027803/rules-of-engagement-the-type-vi-secretion-system-in-vibrio-cholerae
#20
REVIEW
Avatar Joshi, Benjamin Kostiuk, Andrew Rogers, Jennifer Teschler, Stefan Pukatzki, Fitnat H Yildiz
Microbial species often exist in complex communities where they must avoid predation and compete for favorable niches. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a contact-dependent bacterial weapon that allows for direct killing of competitors through the translocation of proteinaceous toxins. Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative pathogen that can use its T6SS during antagonistic interactions with neighboring prokaryotic and eukaryotic competitors. The T6SS not only promotes V. cholerae's survival during its aquatic and host life cycles, but also influences its evolution by facilitating horizontal gene transfer...
December 24, 2016: Trends in Microbiology
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