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Trends in Microbiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342597/bacteria-bacteriophage-coevolution-in-the-human-gut-implications-for-microbial-diversity-and-functionality
#1
REVIEW
Pauline D Scanlan
Antagonistic coevolution (AC) between bacteria and bacteriophages plays a key role in driving and maintaining microbial diversity. Consequently, AC is predicted to affect all levels of biological organisation, from the individual to ecosystem scales. Nonetheless, we know nothing about bacteria-bacteriophage AC in perhaps the most important and clinically relevant microbial ecosystem known to humankind - the human gut microbiome. In this opinion piece I review current research on bacteria-phage AC in in vitro and natural populations of microbes...
March 22, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28336178/symbiont-acquisition-and-replacement-as-a-source-of-ecological-innovation
#2
REVIEW
Sailendharan Sudakaran, Christian Kost, Martin Kaltenpoth
Nutritional symbionts play a major role in the ecology and evolution of insects. The recent accumulation of knowledge on the identity, function, genomics, and phylogenetic relationships of insect-bacteria symbioses provides the opportunity to assess the effects of symbiont acquisitions and replacements on the shift into novel ecological niches and subsequent lineage diversification. The megadiverse insect order Hemiptera presents a particularly large diversity of symbiotic associations that has frequently undergone shifts in symbiont localization and identity, which have contributed to the exploitation of nutritionally imbalanced diets such as plant saps or vertebrate blood...
March 20, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28285909/interferon-i-the-pi%C3%A3-ce-de-r%C3%A3-sistance-of-hiv-1-transmission
#3
Damien C Tully, Daniel T Claiborne, Todd M Allen
Despite the extensive viral quasispecies that develops in an individual during the course of HIV-1 infection, transmission is typically established by a single donor viral variant. Recent studies now provide insight into the phenotypic properties influencing this selection process at transmission, including the contribution of resistance to type I interferons.
March 9, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28285908/are-cdi-systems-multicolored-facultative-helping-greenbeards
#4
REVIEW
Elizabeth S Danka, Erin C Garcia, Peggy A Cotter
Competitive and cooperative interactions between organisms, including bacteria, can significantly impact the composition of a community and the fitness of its members, as well as the fitness of their hosts when communities are living on or within other organisms. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical to the development of strategies to control microbiological communities that impact animal and plant health and also for understanding the evolution of social behaviors, which has been challenging for evolutionary biologists...
March 9, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284876/dual-immunity-concomitantly-suppresses-hiv-1-progression
#5
Huma Qureshi, Jayanta Bhattacharya
Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) elicited in HIV-1(+) elite neutralizers typically are unable to reduce viremia in the same individuals from whom they are isolated. A recent study reports the development of bnAbs in an elite controller that, along with the help of T cells, were associated with restricting HIV-1 progression.
March 8, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284875/bioengineered-3d-models-for-studying-human-cell-tuberculosis-interactions
#6
Sulayman Benmerzoug, Valerie F J Quesniaux
In vivo animal models have intrinsic limitations for studying relationships between tuberculosis and its host and there is a need for alternative, in vitro cellular models. A microsphere-based 3D in vitro culture system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected human blood mononuclear cells was reported to address specific aspects of host-pathogen interactions.
March 8, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283403/genome-surfing-as-driver-of-microbial-genomic-diversity
#7
REVIEW
Mallory J Choudoir, Kevin Panke-Buisse, Cheryl P Andam, Daniel H Buckley
Historical changes in population size, such as those caused by demographic range expansions, can produce nonadaptive changes in genomic diversity through mechanisms such as gene surfing. We propose that demographic range expansion of a microbial population capable of horizontal gene exchange can result in genome surfing, a mechanism that can cause widespread increase in the pan-genome frequency of genes acquired by horizontal gene exchange. We explain that patterns of genetic diversity within Streptomyces are consistent with genome surfing, and we describe several predictions for testing this hypothesis both in Streptomyces and in other microorganisms...
March 7, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274524/critical-streptococcus-suis-virulence-factors-are-they-all-really-critical
#8
REVIEW
Mariela Segura, Nahuel Fittipaldi, Cynthia Calzas, Marcelo Gottschalk
Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen that can be transmitted to humans by contact with diseased animals or contaminated raw pork products. This pathogen possesses a coat of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) that confers protection against the immune system. Yet, the CPS is not the only virulence factor enabling this bacterium to successfully colonize, invade, and disseminate in its host leading to severe systemic diseases such as meningitis and toxic shock-like syndrome. Indeed, recent research developments, cautiously inventoried in this review, have revealed over 100 'putative virulence factors or traits' (surface-associated or secreted components, regulatory genes or metabolic pathways), of which at least 37 have been claimed as being 'critical' for virulence...
March 6, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28262512/collective-infectious-units-in-viruses
#9
REVIEW
Rafael Sanjuán
Increasing evidence indicates that viruses do not simply propagate as independent virions among cells, organs, and hosts. Instead, viral spread is often mediated by structures that simultaneously transport groups of viral genomes, such as polyploid virions, aggregates of virions, virion-containing proteinaceous structures, secreted lipid vesicles, and virus-induced cell-cell contacts. These structures increase the multiplicity of infection, independently of viral population density and transmission bottlenecks...
March 3, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259385/kshv-micrornas-tricks-of-the-devil
#10
REVIEW
Jie Qin, Wan Li, Shou-Jiang Gao, Chun Lu
Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a vascular tumor frequently found in immunodeficient individuals. KSHV encodes 12 pre-microRNAs (pre-miRNAs), which are processed into 25 mature microRNAs (miRNAs). KSHV miRNAs maintain KSHV latency, enhance angiogenesis and dissemination of the infected cells, and interfere with the host immune system by regulating viral and cellular gene expression, ultimately contributing to KS development. In this review, we briefly introduce the biogenesis of miRNAs and then describe the recent advances in defining the roles and mechanisms of action of KSHV miRNAs in KS development...
March 2, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259384/biofilms-microbial-cities-wherein-flow-shapes-competition
#11
Su Chuen Chew, Liang Yang
The phenotypic diversity in biofilms allows bacteria to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Stochastic gene expression and structural differentiation are believed to confer phenotypic diversity. However, two recent publications demonstrate how hydrodynamic flow and substrate topography can also alter the competitive outcomes of different bacterial phenotypes, increasing biofilm phenotypic variation.
March 1, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28245952/streptomyces-exploration-competition-volatile-communication-and-new-bacterial-behaviours
#12
REVIEW
Stephanie E Jones, Marie A Elliot
Streptomyces bacteria are prolific producers of specialized metabolites, and have a well studied, complex life cycle. Recent work has revealed a new type of Streptomyces growth termed 'exploration' - so named for the ability of explorer cells to rapidly traverse solid surfaces. Streptomyces exploration is stimulated by fungal interactions, and is associated with the production of an alkaline volatile organic compound (VOC) capable of inducing exploration by other streptomycetes. Here, we examine Streptomyces exploration from the perspectives of interkingdom interactions, pH-induced morphological switches, and VOC-mediated communication...
February 27, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28242053/regulation-mechanisms-of-viral-ires-driven-translation
#13
REVIEW
Kuo-Ming Lee, Chi-Jene Chen, Shin-Ru Shih
Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) can be found in the mRNA of many viruses as well as in cellular genes involved in the stress response, cell cycle, and apoptosis. IRES-mediated translation can occur when dominant cap-dependent translation is inhibited, and viruses can take advantage of this to subvert host translation machinery. In this review, we focus on the four major types of IRES identified in RNA viruses, and outline their distinct structural properties and requirements of translational factors. We further discuss auxiliary host factors known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), which are involved in the modulation of optimal IRES activity...
February 24, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28233621/picking-the-survivor-crispr-reveals-hiv-dependency-factors
#14
Kerstin Schott, Renate König
A new study employs genome-wide loss-of-function CRISPR/Cas9 screening to identify three novel factors for HIV-1 entry. The factors represent promising targets for therapeutics as they are essential for HIV-1 infection, but dispensable for cell survival. The involved pathways were validated in primary CD4(+) T cells, target cells for HIV-1.
February 20, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216294/spatial-and-temporal-control-of-evolution-through-replication-transcription-conflicts
#15
REVIEW
Houra Merrikh
Evolution could potentially be accelerated if an organism could selectively increase the mutation rate of specific genes that are actively under positive selection. Recently, a mechanism that cells can use to target rapid evolution to specific genes was discovered. This mechanism is driven by gene orientation-dependent encounters between DNA replication and transcription machineries. These encounters increase mutagenesis in lagging-strand genes, where replication-transcription conflicts are severe. Due to the orientation and transcription-dependent nature of this process, conflict-driven mutagenesis can be used by cells to spatially (gene-specifically) and temporally (only upon transcription induction) regulate the rate of gene evolution...
February 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216293/the-secrets-of-acinetobacter-secretion
#16
REVIEW
Brent S Weber, Rachel L Kinsella, Christian M Harding, Mario F Feldman
Infections caused by the bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are a mounting concern for healthcare practitioners as widespread antibiotic resistance continues to limit therapeutic treatment options. The biological processes used by A. baumannii to cause disease are not well defined, but recent research has indicated that secreted proteins may play a major role. A variety of mechanisms have now been shown to contribute to protein secretion by A. baumannii and other pathogenic species of Acinetobacter, including a type II secretion system (T2SS), a type VI secretion system (T6SS), autotransporter, and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs)...
February 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216292/evolutionary-constraints-shaping-streptococcus-pyogenes-host-interactions
#17
REVIEW
Reid V Wilkening, Michael J Federle
Research on the Gram-positive human-restricted pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) has long focused on invasive illness, the most severe manifestations of GAS infection. Recent advances in descriptions of molecular mechanisms of GAS virulence, coupled with massive sequencing efforts to isolate genomes, have allowed the field to better understand the molecular and evolutionary changes leading to pandemic strains. These findings suggest that it is necessary to rethink the dogma involving GAS pathogenesis, and that the most productive avenues for research going forward may be investigations into GAS in its 'normal' habitat, the nasopharynx, and its ability to either live with its host in an asymptomatic lifestyle or as an agent of superficial infections...
February 16, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28209400/multidrug-resistant-enterococcal-infections-new-compounds-novel-antimicrobial-therapies
#18
REVIEW
Roel M van Harten, Rob J L Willems, Nathaniel I Martin, Antoni P A Hendrickx
Over the past two decades infections due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have escalated world-wide, affecting patient morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Among these bacteria, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis represent opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that cause difficult-to-treat infections because of intrinsic and acquired resistance to a plethora of antibiotics. In recent years, a number of novel antimicrobial compound classes have been discovered and developed that target Gram-positive bacteria, including E...
February 13, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190635/langerhans-cells-the-yin-and-yang-of-hiv-restriction-and-transmission
#19
Luzia Mayr, Bin Su, Christiane Moog
Langerhans cells are specialized sentinels present in the epidermis expressing Langerin, a specific C-type lectin receptor involved in HIV capture and destruction. Recently, the specific mechanism leading to this HIV restriction was discovered. Nevertheless, Langerhans cells can be infected and the way HIV escapes this restriction needs to be unraveled.
February 9, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28189381/rna-chaperones-step-out-of-hfq-s-shadow
#20
Laetitia Attaiech, J N Mark Glover, Xavier Charpentier
The stability and function of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) often require a specialized RNA-binding protein called an RNA chaperone. Recent findings show that proteins containing a ProQ/FinO domain constitute a new class of RNA chaperones that could play key roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation throughout bacterial species.
February 8, 2017: Trends in Microbiology
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