journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Molecular Ecology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28222239/evolutionary-rescue-and-local-adaptation-under-different-rates-of-temperature-increase-a-combined-analysis-of-changes-in-phenotype-expression-and-genotype-frequency-in-paramecium-microcosms
#1
Joshua Killeen, Claire Gougat-Barbera, Sascha Krenek, Oliver Kaltz
Evolutionary Rescue (ER) occurs when populations, which have declined due to rapid environmental change, recover through genetic adaptation. The success of this process and the evolutionary trajectory of the population strongly depend on the rate of environmental change. Here we investigated how different rates of temperature increase (from 23°C to 32°C) affect population persistence and evolutionary change in experimental microcosms of the protozoan Paramecium caudatum. Consistent with theory on ER, we found that those populations experiencing the slowest rate of temperature increase were the least likely to become extinct and tended to be the best adapted to the new temperature environment...
February 21, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28222237/extreme-genetic-structure-in-a-social-bird-species-despite-high-dispersal-capacity
#2
Francisco Morinha, José A Dávila, Estela Bastos, João A Cabral, Óscar Frías, José L González, Paulo Travassos, Diogo Carvalho, Borja Milá, Guillermo Blanco
Social barriers have been shown to reduce gene flow and contribute to genetic structure among populations in species with high cognitive capacity and complex societies, such as cetaceans, apes and humans. In birds, high dispersal capacity is thought to prevent population divergence unless major geographic or habitat barriers induce isolation patterns by dispersal, colonization or adaptation limitation. We report that Iberian populations of the red-billed chough, a social, gregarious corvid with high dispersal capacity, show a striking degree of genetic structure composed of at least 15 distinct genetic units...
February 21, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28222236/differential-sharing-and-distinct-co-occurrence-networks-among-spatially-close-bacterial-microbiota-of-bark-mosses-and-lichens%C3%A2-%C3%A2
#3
Ines Aline Aschenbrenner, Tomislav Cernava, Armin Erlacher, Gabriele Berg, Martin Grube
Knowledge of bacterial community host-specificity has increased greatly in recent years. However, the inter-microbiome relationships of unrelated but spatially close organisms remain little understood. Trunks of trees covered by epiphytes represent complex habitats with a mosaic of ecological niches. In this context, we investigated the structure, diversity and interactions of microbiota associated with lichens, mosses and the bare tree bark. Comparative analysis revealed significant differences in the habitat-associated community structures...
February 21, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220980/the-fire-ant-social-chromosome-supergene-variant-sb-shows-low-diversity-but-high-divergence-from-sb
#4
Rodrigo Pracana, Anurag Priyam, Ilya Levantis, Richard A Nichols, Yannick Wurm
Variation in social behavior is common yet little is known about the genetic architectures underpinning its evolution. A rare exception is in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta: Alternative variants of a supergene region determine whether a colony will have exactly one or up to dozens of queens. The two variants of this region are carried by a pair of "social chromosomes", SB and Sb, which resemble a pair of sex chromosomes. Recombination is suppressed between the two chromosomes in the supergene region. While the X-like SB can recombine with itself in SB/SB queens, recombination is effectively absent in the Y-like Sb because Sb/Sb queens die before reproducing...
February 21, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214377/reciprocal-translocation-of-small-numbers-of-inbred-individuals-rescues-immunogenetic-diversity
#5
Catherine E Grueber, Jolene T Sutton, Sol Heber, James V Briskie, Ian G Jamieson, Bruce C Robertson
Genetic rescue can reduce inbreeding depression and increase fitness of small populations, even when the donor populations are highly inbred. In a recent experiment involving two inbred island populations of the South Island robin, Petroica australis, reciprocal translocations improved microsatellite diversity and individual fitness. While microsatellite loci may reflect patterns of genome-wide diversity, they generally do not indicate the specific genetic regions responsible for increased fitness. We tested the effectiveness of this reciprocal translocation for rescuing diversity of two immunogenetic regions: toll-like receptor (TLR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes...
February 18, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214372/canonical-and-cellular-pathways-timing-gamete-release-in-acropora-digitifera-okinawa-japan
#6
Y Rosenberg, T Doniger, S Harii, F Sinniger, O Levy
Natural light cycles are important for synchronizing behavioral and physiological rhythms over varying time-periods in both plants and animals. An endogenous clock, regulated by positive and negative elements, interacting in feedback loops, control these rhythms. Many corals exhibit diel cycles of polyp expansion and contraction entrained by solar light patterns and monthly cycles of spawning or planulation that correspond to nocturnal lunar light cycles. However, despite considerable interest in studies of coral reproduction, there is currently not enough molecular information about the cellular pathways involved with synchronizing spawning/planulation in broadcast spawners and brooders...
February 18, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214367/population-genetic-structure-and-adaptation-of-malaria-parasites-on-the-edge-of-endemic-distribution
#7
Craig W Duffy, Hampate Ba, Samuel Assefa, Ambroise D Ahouidi, Yacine B Deh, Abderahmane Tandia, Freja C M Kirsebom, Dominic P Kwiatkowski, David J Conway
To determine whether the major human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exhibits fragmented population structure or local adaptation at the northern limit of its African distribution where the dry Sahel zone meets the Sahara, samples were collected from diverse locations within Mauritania over a range of ~ 1000 kilometres. Microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 203 clinical infection samples from eight locations, and Illumina paired-end sequences were obtained to yield high coverage genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for 65 clinical infection samples from four locations...
February 18, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214359/gene-expression-plasticity-in-response-to-salinity-acclimation-in-threespine-stickleback-ecotypes-from-different-salinity-habitats
#8
Taylor C Gibbons, David C H Metzger, Timothy M Healy, Patricia M Schulte
Phenotypic plasticity is thought to facilitate the colonization of novel environments and shape the direction of evolution in colonizing populations. However, the relative prevalence of various predicted patterns of changes in phenotypic plasticity following colonization remain unclear. Here we use a whole-transcriptome approach to characterize patterns of gene expression plasticity in the gills of a freshwater-adapted and a saltwater-adapted ecotype of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to a range of salinities...
February 18, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214357/nesting-habits-influence-population-genetic-structure-of-a-bee-living-in-anthropogenic-disturbance
#9
J L Vickruck, M H Richards
While most organisms are negatively affected by anthropogenic disturbance, a few species thrive in landscapes altered by humans. Typically, native bees are negatively impacted by anthropogenic environmental change, including habitat alteration and climate change. Here we investigate the population structure of the eastern carpenter bee Xylocopa virginica, a generalist pollinator with a broad geographic range spanning eastern North America. Eastern carpenter bees now nest almost exclusively in human made wooden structures, linking their geographic distribution and population structure to human activities and disturbance...
February 18, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214356/comparative-analysis-of-the-transcriptional-responses-to-low-and-high-temperature-in-three-rice-planthopper-species
#10
Hai-Jian Huang, Jian Xue, Ji-Chong Zhuo, Ruo-Lin Cheng, Hai-Jun Xu, Chuan-Xi Zhang
The brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens, BPH), white-backed planthopper (Sogatella furcifera, WBPH), and small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus, SBPH) are important rice pests in Asia. These three species differ in thermal tolerance and exhibit quite different migration and overwintering strategies. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we sequenced and compared the transcriptome of the three species under different temperature treatments. We found that metabolism-, exoskeleton-, and chemosensory-related genes were modulated...
February 18, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207977/adaptation-of-the-pathogen-pseudomonas-syringae-during-experimental-evolution-on-a-native-versus-alternative-host-plant
#11
Sean Meaden, Britt Koskella
The specialization and distribution of pathogens among species has substantial impact on disease spread, especially when reservoir hosts can maintain high pathogen densities or select for increased pathogen virulence. Theory predicts that optimal within-host growth rate will vary among host genotypes/species, and therefore that pathogens infecting multiple hosts should experience different selection pressures depending on the host environment in which they are found. This should be true for pathogens with broad host ranges, but also those experiencing opportunistic infections on novel hosts or that spill over among host populations...
February 16, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207957/phylogenetic-relatedness-explains-highly-interconnected-and-nested-symbiotic-networks-of-woody-plants-and-arbuscular-mycorrhizal-fungi-in-a-chinese-subtropical-forest
#12
Liang Chen, Yong Zheng, Cheng Gao, Xiang-Cheng Mi, Ke-Ping Ma, Tesfaye Wubet, Liang-Dong Guo
Elucidating symbiotic relationships between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plants contributes to a better understanding of their reciprocally dependent co-existence and community assembly. However, the main drivers of plant and AMF community assembly remain unclear. In this study, we examined AMF communities from 166 root samples of 17 woody plant species from 10 quadrats in a Chinese subtropical forest using 454 pyrosequencing of 18S rRNA gene to describe symbiotic AMF-plant association. Our results show the woody plant-AMF networks to be highly interconnected and nested, but in anti-modular and anti-specialized manners...
February 16, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207956/application-of-network-methods-for-understanding-evolutionary-dynamics-in-discrete-habitats
#13
Gili Greenbaum, Nina H Fefferman
In populations occupying discrete habitat patches, gene flow between habitat patches may form an intricate population structure. In such structures, the evolutionary dynamics resulting from interaction of gene flow patterns with other evolutionary forces may be exceedingly complex. Several models describing gene flow between discrete habitat patches have been presented in the population genetics literature; however, these models have usually addressed relatively simple settings of habitable patches, and have stopped short of providing general methodologies for addressing non-trivial gene flow patterns...
February 16, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207182/immune-system-stimulation-by-the-gut-symbiont-frischella-perrara-in-the-honey-bee-apis-mellifera
#14
Olivier Emery, Konstantin Schmidt, Philipp Engel
Gut bacteria engage in various symbiotic interactions with their host and impact gut immunity and homeostasis in different ways. In honey bees, the gut microbiota is composed of a relatively simple, but highly specialized bacterial community. One of its members, the gammaproteobacterium Frischella perrara induces the so-called scab phenotype, a dark-colored band that develops on the epithelial surface of the pylorus. To understand the underlying host response, we analyzed transcriptome changes in the gut in response to bacterial colonization...
February 16, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207173/sensitivity-analysis-of-effective-population-size-to-demographic-parameters-in-house-sparrow-populations
#15
Marlene Waege Stubberud, Ane Marlene Myhre, Håkon Holand, Thomas Kvalnes, Thor Harald Ringsby, Bernt-Erik Saether, Henrik Jensen
The ratio between the effective and the census population size, Ne/N, is an important measure of the long-term viability and sustainability of a population. Understanding which demographic processes that affect Ne/N most will improve our understanding of how genetic drift and the probability of fixation of alleles is affected by demography. This knowledge may also be of vital importance in management of endangered populations and species. Here, we use data from 13 natural populations of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) in Norway to calculate the demographic parameters that determine Ne/N...
February 16, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28206693/plasmid-and-clonal-interference-during-post-horizontal-gene-transfer-evolution
#16
S Bedhomme, D Perez Pantoja, I G Bravo
Plasmids are nucleic acid molecules that can drive their own replication in a living cell. They can be transmitted horizontally and can thrive in the host cell to high copy numbers. Plasmid replication and gene expression consume cellular resources and cells carrying plasmids incur fitness costs. But many plasmids carry genes that can be beneficial under certain conditions, allowing the cell to endure in the presence of antibiotics, toxins, competitors or parasites. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded genes can thus instantaneously confer differential adaptation to local or transient selection conditions...
February 16, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192619/genomic-signatures-of-adaptation-to-wine-biological-aging-conditions%C3%A2-in-biofilm-forming-flor-yeasts
#17
A L Coi, F Bigey, S Mallet, S Marsit, G Zara, P Gladieux, V Galeote, M Budroni, S Dequin, J L Legras
The molecular and evolutionary processes underlying fungal domestication remain largely unknown despite the importance of fungi to bioindustry and for comparative adaptation genomics in eukaryotes. Wine fermentation and biological aging are performed by strains of S. cerevisiae with, respectively, pelagic fermentative growth on glucose, and biofilm aerobic growth utilizing ethanol. Here, we use environmental samples of wine and flor yeasts to investigate the genomic basis of yeast adaptation to contrasted anthropogenic environments...
February 13, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188662/population-genetics-of-reef-coral-endosymbionts-symbiodinium-dinophyceae
#18
D J Thornhill, E J Howells, D C Wham, T D Steury, S R Santos
Symbiodinium is a diverse genus of unicellular dinoflagellate symbionts associating with various marine protists and invertebrates. Although the broad-scale diversity and phylogenetics of the Symbiodinium complex is well established, there have been surprisingly few data on fine-scale population structure and biogeography of these dinoflagellates. Yet population level processes contribute strongly to the biology of Symbiodinium, including how anthropogenic-driven global climate change impacts these symbionts and their host associations...
February 11, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173637/specificity-of-fungal-associations-of-pyroleae-and-monotropa-hypopitys-during-germination-and-seedling-development
#19
V A Johansson, M Bahram, L Tedersoo, U Kõljalg, O Eriksson
Mycoheterotrophic plants obtain organic carbon from associated mycorrhizal fungi, fully or partially. Angiosperms with this form of nutrition possess exceptionally small 'dust seeds' which after germination develop 'seedlings' that remain subterranean for several years, fully dependent on fungi for supply of carbon. Mycoheterotrophs which as adults have photosynthesis thus develop from full to partial mycoheterotrophy, or autotrophy, during ontogeny. Mycoheterotrophic plants may represent a gradient of variation in a parasitism-mutualism continuum, both among and within species...
February 7, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173627/genetic-architecture-and-balancing-selection-the-life-and-death-of-differentiated-variants
#20
Violaine Llaurens, Annabel Whibley, Mathieu Joron
Balancing selection describes any form of natural selection which results in the persistence of multiple variants of a trait at intermediate frequencies within populations. By offering up a snapshot of multiple co-occurring functional variants and their interactions, systems under balancing selection can reveal the evolutionary mechanisms favouring the emergence and persistence of adaptive variation in natural populations. We here focus on the mechanisms by which several functional variants for a given trait can arise, a process typically requiring multiple epistatic mutations...
February 7, 2017: Molecular Ecology
journal
journal
31156
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"