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Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414686/minimally-invasive-oncologic-surgery-part-i
#1
EDITORIAL
Claudius Conrad, James W Fleshman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414685/minimally-invasive-oncologic-surgery
#2
EDITORIAL
Timothy M Pawlik
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414684/robotic-developments-in-cancer-surgery
#3
REVIEW
Carolijn L M A Nota, Francina Jasmijn Smits, Yanghee Woo, Inne H M Borel Rinkes, Izaak Quintus Molenaar, Jeroen Hagendoorn, Yuman Fong
Indications for robotic surgery have been rapidly expanding since the first introduction of the robotic surgical system in the US market in 2000. As the robotic systems have become more sophisticated over the past decades, there has been an expansion in indications. Many new tools have been added with the aim of optimizing outcomes after oncologic surgery. Complex abdominal cancers are increasingly operated on using robot-assisted laparoscopy and with acceptable outcomes. In this article, the authors discuss robotic developments, from the past and the future, with an emphasis on cancer surgery...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414683/minimally-invasive-surgery-for-palliation
#4
REVIEW
Jordan M Cloyd
Palliative care is the multidisciplinary focus on patient symptoms and quality of life. The emphasis of minimally invasive surgery on reduced pain and faster recovery aligns well with the goals of palliative care. Minimally invasive approaches can be safely and effectively used to address several common complications of solid organ malignancies as well as the complications of cytotoxic therapy. A patient-centered, minimally invasive approach will not only help alleviate disabling symptoms and improve patient quality of life but will also minimize the pain and adverse effects of the intervention itself...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414682/minimally-invasive-staging-surgery-for-cancer
#5
REVIEW
Noah A Cohen, Thomas Peter Kingham
Staging laparoscopy (SL) is used to assess for radiographically occult metastatic disease and local resectability in selected patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. SL may avoid nontherapeutic laparotomy in patients with unresectable cancer and is associated with shorter length of hospital stay and time to receipt of systemic therapy compared with nontherapeutic laparotomy. With improvements in preoperative imaging, careful patient selection for SL is imperative. SL and peritoneal washings should be considered for patients with distal gastroesophageal and locally advanced gastric cancer before planned neoadjuvant chemotherapy or resection...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414681/fluorescence-imaging-for-minimally-invasive-cancer-surgery
#6
REVIEW
Takeaki Ishizawa, Akio Saiura
This article demonstrates surgical techniques of intraoperative fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green, focusing on its application in minimally invasive hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgery. In this area, indocyanine green fluorescence imaging has been applied to liver cancer identification, fluorescence cholangiography, delineation of hepatic segments, and fluorescence angiography and perfusion assessment. The development of target-specific fluorophores and advances in imaging technology will allow real-time intraoperative fluorescence imaging to develop into an essential intraoperative navigation tool...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414680/virtual-and-augmented-reality-in-oncologic-liver-surgery
#7
REVIEW
Giuseppe Quero, Alfonso Lapergola, Luc Soler, Jacques Marescaux, Didier Mutter, Patrick Pessaux
Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in complex surgery are evolving technologies enabling improved preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation. The basis of these technologies is a computer-based generation of a patient-specific 3-dimensional model from Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data. This article provides a state-of-the- art overview on the clinical use of this technology with a specific focus on hepatic surgery. Although VR and AR are still in an evolving stage with only some clinical application today, these technologies have the potential to become a key factor in improving preoperative and intraoperative decision making...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414679/endoscopic-management-of-pancreatic-cancer
#8
REVIEW
Jeffrey H Lee, Osman Ahmed
The role of endoscopy in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer continues to evolve. The early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer has been difficult. Endoscopic ultrasound examination should be used to examine pancreatic lesions because it can characterize lesions and sample tissue. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is essential in managing biliary obstructions. Endoscopic ultrasound can assist in gaining access to difficult biliary trees. Endoscopic placement of luminal stents can be used for palliative purposes...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414678/minimally-invasive-approaches-to-pediatric-solid-tumors
#9
REVIEW
Emily R Christison-Lagay, Daniel Thomas
Over the last decade, driven in part by the favorable adult experience and a crescendoing number of case series and retrospective reports in the pediatric surgical literature, minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches are increasingly used as adjunctive or definitive surgical treatments for an ever-expanding list of pediatric tumors. Although most current treatment protocols lack surgical guidelines regarding the use of MIS, this growing body of MIS literature provides a framework for the development of multicenter trial groups, prospective registries, and further centralization of subspecialist services...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414677/robotic-head-and-neck-surgery
#10
REVIEW
Andrey Finegersh, Floyd Christopher Holsinger, Neil D Gross, Ryan K Orosco
Robotic head and neck surgery applies minimally invasive principles to unique anatomy and natural orifices for surgical access. Expanding from a tradition of minimally invasive endoscopic otolaryngology procedures, surgical robotics has transformed head and neck surgery. However, surgeons are faced with significant challenges, and anatomic constraints impede visualization and constrain surgical maneuvers. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has been developed over the past decade with favorable oncologic and functional outcomes, changing the way head and neck surgeons approach both malignant and benign diseases...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414676/training-for-minimally-invasive-cancer-surgery
#11
REVIEW
Janelle F Rekman, Adnan Alseidi
The surgical oncologist of the future requires training in minimally invasive techniques. Increasing constraints on time and resources have led to a new emphasis on finding innovative ways to teach these surgical skills inside and outside the operating room. The goal of producing technically gifted minimally invasive surgical (MIS) oncologists requires robust, educationally sound training curricula. This article describes how MIS oncology training occurs at present with an outline of educational ideals training programs can strive for, provides two examples of successful MIS oncology programs to highlight effective strategies for moving forward, and introduces three new developments on the horizon...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414675/transluminal-cancer-surgery
#12
REVIEW
Antonio M Lacy, Fransisco Borja De Lacy, Silvia Valverde
Transluminal surgery, also known as natural orifices endoluminal surgery, can be considered the most minimally invasive approach of gaining access to an organ. Although some approaches, such as transgastric or transvaginal cholecystectomy, have remained experimental, peroral endoscopic myotomy to treat achalasia and transanal total mesorectal excision to treat low rectal cancer have become accepted, safe, and feasible approaches by trained surgeons for selected patients. This article recapitulates the development of transluminal surgery from its experimental beginnings to the validated procedure it has become today...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30414674/history-of-minimally-invasive-surgical-oncology
#13
REVIEW
Julietta Chang, David W Rattner
Introduction of the fiberoptic light-source and CCD chip camera resulted in the rapid growth of minimally invasive surgical procedures. In surgical oncology, the change came slowly owing to concerns about adhering to oncological principals while learning to use new technology. Pioneers in minimally invasive colorectal surgery proved that minimally invasive resection for cancer was oncologically noninferior to traditional surgery. Early adopters treating esophageal and gastric cancer established that a minimally invasive approach was feasible with lower morbidity and equivalent oncologic outcomes...
January 2019: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213418/measuring-quality-in-a-shifting-payment-landscape-implications-for-surgical-oncology
#14
EDITORIAL
Daniel E Abbott, Caprice C Greenberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213417/quality-in-a-shifting-payment-landscape-and-the-implications-for-surgical-oncology
#15
EDITORIAL
Timothy M Pawlik
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213416/expanding-the-scope-of-evidence-based-cancer-care
#16
REVIEW
Victoria Rendell, Ryan Schmocker, Daniel E Abbott
This article explores how oncology research can be expanded to ensure that research spending results in maximum benefit. The focus has shifted to the value and quality of care, which view cancer care with the perspective of the patient at the center and cover the spectrum of care. Because there is no agreed-upon definition for value in cancer care, we overview various contributions to defining value and quality in oncology. We outline how cancer care costs are measured in the United States and explore outcome measures that have been proposed and implemented to enable us to assess value in oncology...
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213415/the-accountable-care-organization-for-surgical-care
#17
REVIEW
Matthew J Resnick
Rising health care costs superimposed on uncertainty surrounding the relationship between health care spending and quality have resulted in an urgent need to develop strategies to better align health care payment with value. Such approaches, at least in theory, work to achieve the dual aims of reducing growth in health care spending and improving population health. To date, surgery has not been prioritized in accountable care organizations (ACOs). Nonetheless, it is critically important to begin to consider strategic and impactful mechanisms through which surgery can be seamlessly woven into innovative population health models...
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213414/malignant-bowel-obstruction-reappraising-the-value-of-surgery
#18
REVIEW
Robert E Roses, Ian W Folkert, Robert S Krouse
Urgent palliative surgery in the setting of advanced malignancy is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Malignant bowel obstruction is the most frequent indication for such intervention. Traditional surgical dogma is often invoked to justify associated risks and cost, but little evidence exists to support surgical over nonsurgical approaches. Evolving evidence may provide more meaningful guidance for treatment selection.
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213413/regionalization-and-its-alternatives
#19
REVIEW
Stephanie Lumpkin, Karyn Stitzenberg
This article begins by introducing the historical background surrounding the volume-outcomes relationship literature, particularly in complex cancer surgery. The state of evidence surrounding mortality, as well as other outcomes, in relation to both hospital and surgeon procedure volume is synthesized. Where it is understood, the level of adoption of regionalization of various complex surgeries in the United States is also presented. Various controversies are weighed and discussed. Finally, various models of regionalization and proposed alternatives to regionalization from the peer-reviewed literature are presented...
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213412/health-related-quality-of-life-the-impact-on-morbidity-and-mortality
#20
REVIEW
Andrea Sitlinger, Syed Yousuf Zafar
In the age of ever-expanding treatments and precision medicine, the hope for cure remains the ultimate goal for patients and providers. Equally important to many patients is the quality of life achieved during and after treatment. Evidence suggests that overall quality of life is important to patients and plays a role in determining outcomes in patients with cancer. This article examines components of health-related quality of life and cancer treatment, including physical, psychosocial, and financial burden, as well as how these components affect patients' overall wellbeing and survival...
October 2018: Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America
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