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Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30109919/does-use-of-the-lucas-device-improve-mortality-in-adult-patients-with-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest
#1
Rob Fenwick
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a common occurrence in the UK, with 60,000 cases reported annually. To improve outcomes among these patients it is necessary to improve links in the cardiac arrest chain of survival. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is one of the main elements of this chain because it reduces further ischaemic insult in the brain and heart by contributing to blood flow. However, even the best manual CPR provides only 20%-30% of the normal cardiac output. Despite the emphasis on timely CPR at the correct rate and depth, delivery of compressions is suboptimal for many patients and mechanical devices may improve outcomes...
August 15, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30091549/lyme-disease-recognition-and-management-for-emergency-nurses
#2
Stephen McGhee, Connie Visovksy, Cheryl Zambroski, Alan Finnegan
Over the past ten years there has been a significant rise in the number of people who present to emergency departments with Lyme disease. Although some patients remain asymptomatic many present with a rash around a previous tick bite and others may present with a range of debilitating symptoms that can be problematic if left untreated. Due to the growing prevalence of Lyme disease in the UK and the US this article gives an overview of the vector-borne condition and provides emergency nurses with information about the pathophysiology, prevention, presenting signs and symptoms and management...
August 9, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30047712/compassion-in-emergency-departments-part-2-barriers-to-the-provision-of-compassionate-care
#3
David Hunter, Jacqueline McCallum, Dora Howes
In the second part of this three-part series, David Hunter and colleagues discuss the barriers to the provision of compassionate care in emergency departments (EDs). Part one reported findings from doctoral-level research exploring nursing students' experiences of compassionate care in EDs. Many of the findings related to what the students considered as barriers to the provision of compassionate care in this clinical environment. Six barriers to compassionate care were identified and this article considers them in detail...
July 26, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29969203/emergency-management-of-burns-part-2
#4
Kristina Stiles
Infrequent presentation of this patient group to emergency departments can cause stress and anxiety to front-line clinicians when they are faced with patients with a traumatic burn injury. Assessment relies on accurate evaluation of burn aetiology, size and depth, and initial management is directly responsible for patients' outcomes and quality of life. This is the second article in a two-part series that gives an overview of the minimum standard of care in burns first aid, and highlights the likely challenges in assessment of burn depth and size...
July 3, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29943944/an-exploration-of-the-reasons-why-people-attend-but-do-not-wait-to-be-seen-in-emergency-departments
#5
Alison Williams
AIM: The aim of the study was to explore the reasons why people do not always wait to receive treatment after registering in emergency departments (EDs). METHOD: Patients who attended the ED at a general hospital in the south of England and left without being seen (LWBS) were recorded between 1 June and 31 August 2016 and 597 patient records were analysed. Six patients participated in semi-structured interviews. Data were manually coded. FINDINGS: The most common presenting complaint for people who LWBS was limb problems, however some had potentially more serious conditions such as chest pain...
June 26, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29923693/compassion-in-emergency-departments-part-1-nursing-students-perspectives
#6
David Hunter, Jacqueline McCallum, Dora Howes
Compassion is a topical issue in clinical nursing practice, nurse education and policy, but a review of the literature reveals that nursing students' experiences of compassionate care receives little attention. In this three-part series David Hunter and colleagues explore compassion in emergency departments (EDs) from nursing students' point of view. Part 1 provides findings of a professional doctorate study of nursing students' experiences of compassionate care in EDs, part 2 explores the barriers to compassionate care in this clinical setting that emerged from the study, and part 3 considers factors that enable and support compassionate care provision in EDs...
July 10, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29901315/should-nurses-be-trained-to-use-ultrasound-for-intravenous-access-to-patients-with-difficult-veins
#7
Claire Smith
Peripheral venous access is the most common invasive procedure performed on patients in the UK and is traditionally the responsibility of nursing staff. In an emergency, intravenous therapy can be lifesaving. Approximately 11% of adults have difficult venous access and are often subjected to repeated failed attempts, resulting in delayed diagnosis and treatment. Eventually, rescue methods are used by a doctor, but this increases demand on their time and the workflow of emergency departments. This article explores whether training nurses to obtain venous access using ultrasound would have a positive effect on doctors' workload and benefit adult patients with difficult veins...
July 6, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787035/hair-toe-tourniquets-a-review-of-two-case-studies
#8
Julia Booth, Tim Morse
Digit hair tourniquets are relatively uncommon. There are reports in the literature of hair tourniquets involving other appendages, such as the penis and uvula, however the phenomenon is not widely recognised and is often overlooked by healthcare professionals. This article discusses two case studies in which hair was responsible for creating a tourniquet around a digit. The article explores possible causes and management options for patients, with reference to the case studies. Midwives and health visitors are central to minimising the risk of injury to children as they can educate expectant mothers about this potential problem...
July 6, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30095874/emergency-management-of-burns-part-2
#9
Kristina Stiles
Infrequent presentation of this patient group to emergency departments can cause stress and anxiety to front-line clinicians when they are faced with patients with a traumatic burn injury. Assessment relies on accurate evaluation of burn aetiology, size and depth, and initial management is directly responsible for patients' outcomes and quality of life. This is the second article in a two-part series that gives an overview of the minimum standard of care in burns first aid, and highlights the likely challenges in assessment of burn depth and size...
July 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30095873/why-creating-a-framework-is-worth-the-effort
#10
(no author information available yet)
You have an idea and know roughly what you want to say, but you need a plan. the simplest plan is a beginning, a middle and an end. Whether your article is 300 words or 3,000, it should start with an indication of its purpose. Build it with supporting evidence or argument and conclude in a way that encourages readers to pause and reflect.
July 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30095872/an-epic-outcome
#11
Petra Kendall-Raynor
How one emergency department achieved a 70% rise in patients receiving life-saving sepsis treatment within an hour.
July 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30095871/how-much-training-in-ultrasound-would-emergency-nurses-need
#12
Tricia Scott
Ultrasound sonography, in which a high-pitched sound wave travels at different speeds through objects of variable density, offers effective clinical diagnostic applications to identify problems, such as free abdominal fluid following blunt trauma, cardiac effusion and long bone fractures.
July 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29726128/nurses-attitudes-to-supporting-people-who-are-suicidal-in-emergency-departments
#13
Amanda Briggs
The aim of this study is to determine emergency nurses' knowledge about, and perceived ability to support, people who are suicidal. A questionnaire consisting of 34 questions was sent out to 113 adult emergency nurses employed in two emergency departments. A total of 38 responded. Findings highlight differences in attitudes and show a correlation between suicide prevention training and nurses' perceived competence to triage people who are suicidal. The article makes recommendations for future research, as well as nurse education and training on suicide prevention, to improve attitudes and increase emergency nurses' ability to respond effectively to people who are suicidal...
May 10, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29714427/electrocardiograms-a-guide-to-rhythm-recognition-for-emergency-nurses
#14
Anthony McGrath, Michael Sampson
Electrocardiogram (ECG) is one of the most commonly performed investigations in emergency departments (EDs), and is an extremely useful adjunct that guides diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In most cases nurses are the first healthcare professional to assess patients and record an ECG, yet anecdotal evidence suggests that few emergency nurses review, interpret and act on ECG findings. Research suggests this may be due to lack of confidence in, or knowledge about, interpretation of results, often because of inadequate training...
May 10, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29701036/emergency-management-of-burns-part-1
#15
Kristina Stiles
Caring for patients with burn injuries can be traumatic for staff. Non-specialist clinicians in emergency departments are often the first point of contact for patients with burn injuries and their families. Lack of burns education, exacerbated by infrequent presentations, can add to front-line clinicians' stress and anxiety. Assessment relies on accurate evaluation of burn aetiology, and the size and depth of the injuries, and initial management is directly responsible for patients' outcomes and quality of life...
May 10, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29521080/concussion-in-sport-the-importance-of-accurate-and-reliable-discharge-advice
#16
Cormac Norton
Concussion in sport is a common presentation in urgent and emergency care settings, so it is essential that nurses have a full understanding of the condition. Most patients who attend an emergency department with concussion are discharged and discharge advice must be well-informed and evidence based. This article outlines the normal anatomy of the brain and the pathophysiology of concussion, and discusses the guidelines on returning to sport following this injury.
March 9, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29521079/advanced-nurse-practitioner-scheduled-return-clinic-a-clinical-audit-of-a-quality-initiative
#17
Louise Canty, Anthony Kearney
Emergency care settings in Ireland have struggled with a high volume of service users in recent years. This nationwide crisis led to the establishment of the National Emergency Medicine Programme Strategy in 2012, which identified two key performance indicators for efficiency in emergency care: the patient experience time, which should not exceed six hours from the time of registration to the time of discharge; and patients who do not wait for treatment (DNW) should make up less than 5% of those attending emergency care services...
March 9, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29521078/recognition-and-nursing-management-of-children-with-non-traumatic-limp
#18
Elizabeth Wilson, Peter Cox, Karen Greaves, Siba Prosad Paul
Children with acute onset non-traumatic limp often present to emergency departments (EDs). The limp can occasionally be associated with medical emergencies such as septic arthritis and slipped upper femoral epiphysis but is often due to less severe conditions. This article discusses the common and self-limiting causes of acute onset of non-traumatic limp in children, such as transient synovitis, reactive arthritis, and benign acute childhood myositis. It also discusses more severe conditions, including septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, slipped upper femoral epiphysis, Perthes disease, malignancies and non-accidental injury...
March 9, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29521077/prudent-healthcare-in-emergency-departments-a-case-study-in-wales
#19
Louise Condon, Sharon Burford, Robin Ghosal, Brett Denning, Gail Rees
To deliver a patient-centred service, emergency departments (EDs) must be efficient, effective and meet the needs of the local population. This article describes a service redesign of unscheduled care in a hospital in Wales, which followed the principles of prudent healthcare to improve patient experiences. Extending the roles of nurse specialist practitioners was a major component of the redesign. Six working groups were established to guide the process, one of which was responsible for working cooperatively with the local community, which was concerned about perceived 'downgrading' of the ED...
March 9, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29424494/accidents-and-ethics-a-visual-narrative-approach
#20
Catherine Gadd, Colin Jones
Emergency department (ED) attendances are continuing to rise, and medical and nursing teams are working under considerable strain. ED clinicians are used to thinking on their feet and possess the skills to multitask, and juggle ever-changing and competing priorities against the clock. This article reports the findings of a study that enabled ED clinicians to take time out to reflect on some of the difficult decisions they make daily, and to ask whether they consider ethical principles in depth, and if they are of any practical help...
February 9, 2018: Emergency Nurse: the Journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
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