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Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30079847/who-owns-my-autonomous-vehicle-ethics-and-responsibility-in-artificial-and-human-intelligence
#1
John Harris
This article investigates both the claims made for, and the dangers or opportunities posed by, the development of (allegedly), aspiring or "would-be" autonomous vehicles and other artificially superintelligent machines. It also examines the dilemmas posed by the fact that these individuals might develop ideas above their station. These ideas may also limit or challenge the legitimacy of the proposed management and safety strategies that might be devised to limit the ways in which they might function or malfunction...
August 6, 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29916339/contributors-corrigendum
#2
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 19, 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845925/an-archeology-of-corruption-in-medicine
#3
Miles Little, Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge
Corruption is a word used loosely to describe many kinds of action that people find distasteful. We prefer to reserve it for the intentional misuse of the good offices of an established social entity for private benefit, posing as fair trading. The currency of corruption is not always material or financial. Moral corruption is all too familiar within churches and other ostensibly beneficent institutions, and it happens within medicine and the pharmaceutical industries. Corrupt behavior reduces trust, costs money, causes injustice, and arouses anger...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845924/-i-left-the-museum-somewhat-changed-visual-arts-and-health-ethics-education
#4
Clare Delany, Heather Gaunt
A common goal of ethics education is to equip students who later become health practitioners to not only know about the ethical principles guiding their practice, but to also autonomously recognize when and how these principles might apply and assist these future practitioners in providing care for patients and families. This article aims to contribute to discussions about ethics education pedagogy and teaching, by presenting and evaluating the use of the visual arts as an educational approach designed to facilitate students' moral imagination and independent critical thinking about ethics in clinical practice...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845923/robots-as-imagined-in-the-television-series-humans
#5
Mark R Wicclair
Humans is a science fiction television series set in what appears to be present-day London. What makes it science fiction is that in London and worldwide, there are robots that look like humans and can mimic human behavior. The series raises several important ethical and philosophical questions about artificial intelligence and robotics, which should be of interest to bioethicists.
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845922/mitochondrial-replacement-therapy-and-identity-a-comment-on-an-exchange-between-inmaculada-de-melo-martin-and-john-harris
#6
Søren Holm
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845921/ethics-education-in-new-zealand-medical-schools
#7
John McMillan, Phillipa Malpas, Simon Walker, Monique Jonas
This article describes the well-developed and long-standing medical ethics teaching programs in both of New Zealand's medical schools at the University of Otago and the University of Auckland. The programs reflect the awareness that has been increasing as to the important role that ethics education plays in contributing to the "professionalism" and "professional development" in medical curricula.
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845920/a-closer-look-at-the-junior-doctor-crisis-in-the-united-kingdom-s-national-health-services-is-emigration-justifiable
#8
Wendy Zi Wei Teo
This article attempts to tackle the ethically and morally troubling issue of emigration of physicians from the United Kingdom, and whether it can be justified. Unlike most research that has already been undertaken in this field, which looks at migration from developing countries to developed countries, this article takes an in-depth look at the migration of physicians between developed countries, in particular from the United Kingdom (UK) to other developed countries such as Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States (US)...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845919/moral-enhancement-in-russia-lessons-from-the-past
#9
Pavel Tischenko
Against the contemporary debates on techniques of "moral enhancement," this article reviews the interpretation and methods of moral enhancement during the Stalin years in Russia: (1) the GULAG and (2) the abuse of psychiatry. The article serves as a cautionary tale for today's policy debates, from the personal experiences of the author.
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845918/ethical-reflections-on-the-equity-of-the-current-basic-health-insurance-system-reform-in-china-a-case-study-in-hunan-province
#10
Junxiang Liu, Jingzi Xu, Tianyu Zhang, Yonghui Ma
China's current basic health insurance reform aims at promoting equity in the economic accessibility of health services for all citizens, to better ensure healthcare justice. Therefore, it is important to assess equity not only from a socioeconomic perspective but also from an ethical angle. This article investigates the basic health insurance system of Hunan Province in China by focusing on insurance types as well as their classification standards, mechanisms, and utilization according to local policy documents and data...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845917/the-understanding-of-death-in-terminally-ill-cancer-patients-in-china-an-initial-study
#11
Hai Shan Huang, Tie Ying Zeng, Jing Mao, Xiao Hong Liu
Patient's needs and rights are the key to delivering state-of-the-art modern nursing care. It is especially challenging to provide proper nursing care for patients who are reaching the end of life (EOL). In Chinese culture nursing practice, the perception and expectations of these EOL patients are not well known. This article explores the feelings and wishes of 16 terminally ill Chinese cancer patients who are going through the dying process. An open-ended questionnaire with eight items was used to interview 16 terminally ill Chinese cancer patients, and was then analyzed by a combined approach employing grounded theory and interpretive phenomenological analysis...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845916/determination-of-death-in-execution-by-lethal-injection-in-china
#12
Norbert W Paul, Arthur Caplan, Michael E Shapiro, Charl Els, Kirk C Allison, Huige Li
Since 1997, execution in China has been increasingly performed by lethal injection. The current criteria for determination of death for execution by lethal injection (cessation of heartbeat, cessation of respiration, and dilated pupils) neither conform to current medical science nor to any standard of medical ethics. In practice, death is pronounced in China within tens of seconds after starting the lethal injection. At this stage, however, neither the common criteria for cardiopulmonary death (irreversible cessation of heartbeat and breathing) nor that of brain death (irreversible cessation of brain functions) have been met...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845915/damaging-the-future-the-health-rights-of-children-and-the-issue-of-short-termism-issues-facing-australian-bioethicists
#13
Sally Dalton-Brown
This article considers recent ethical topics in Australia relating to the health rights of children in the contexts of (1) detention centers, (2) vaccination, and (3) procreative liberty, within a wider framework of discussion of the competing rights of society, parents, the child, and future generations.
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845914/access-to-healthcare-a-central-question-within-brazilian-bioethics
#14
Volnei Garrafa, Thiago Rocha DA Cunha, Camilo Manchola
This article explores the current situation regarding the importance of access to healthcare in relation to the genesis and context of bioethics developed in Brazil, a country in which healthcare is understood through the national constitution to be a universal right of its population. Since the onset of the development of Brazilian bioethics at the beginning of the 1990s, topics relating directly and indirectly to the field of public health have been a priority in the bioethics agenda. The article considers the socioeconomic context within which conflicts occur, an issue that has been addressed in other scientific articles on bioethics in Latin America...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845913/patient-engagement-at-the-household-level-a-feasible-way-to-improve-the-chinese-healthcare-delivery-system-toward-people-centred-integrated-care
#15
Ziyu Liu
Influenced by the people-centered integrated care (PCIC) model, Healthy China 2030 was drafted recently with a special concern given to patient engagement. Although there are three levels of engagement (i.e., individual, household, community), patients are more likely to be empowered and activated through an individualistic approach. Thus, engaging patients at the household level appear to have been overlooked so far. Supported by ethical values and practical evidence, this article attempts to address the importance of engaging patients at the household level in shaping the Chinese healthcare system with the PCIC model orientation, and thus recommends four strategies for empowering and activating patients at the household level in the Chinese context...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845912/macao-report-informed-consent-in-a-multilingual-and-multicultural-region-a-bioethical-challenge
#16
Vera Lúcia Raposo
Complying with the requirements of informed consent for medical procedures can sometimes be problematic, even when the hospitals are located in countries that are uniform in their language and cultural values. However, when hospitals are located in countries with diverse linguistic and ethnic communities, it becomes particularly challenging. This article examines how Macao, with four predominant languages-Mandarin, Portuguese, Cantonese and English-and two very strong cultures, Western and Chinese, strives to meet the challenges of informed consent...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845911/a-life-fulfilled-should-there-be-assisted-suicide-for-those-who-are-done-with-living
#17
Martin Buijsen
The issue of assisted suicide for those with a "fulfilled life" is being hotly debated in the Netherlands. A large number of Dutch people feel that elderly people (i.e., people who have reached the age of 70) with a "fulfilled life" should have access to assisted suicide. Citizens have therefore requested Parliament to expand the existing legislation that governs euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. The Dutch constitution does not permit national legislation to be incompatible with higher international (human rights) law...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845910/regulations-on-genome-editing-of-human-embryos-in-japan-our-moral-moratorium
#18
Eisuke Nakazawa, Keiichiro Yamamoto, Aru Akabayashi, Akira Akabayashi
The use of human embryos in genome editing research has recently been approved in China and the United Kingdom. In Japan, the debate on regulations on genome editing research studies using human embryos is underway, but is becoming increasingly entangled, to the point of deadlock. One main reason for this is the misalignment between the Japanese government and the research communities, in their awareness surrounding these regulations. In this article, we report on this ongoing and entangled debate in Japan concerning the regulations on genome editing technology using human embryos...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845909/from-the-editors-building-bridges-not-walls
#19
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29845908/her-uterus-her-medical-decision-dismantling-spousal-consent-for-medically-indicated-hysterectomies-in-saudi-arabia
#20
Ruaim Muaygil
Against the background of a recommended hysterectomy, this article examines the current requirement in Saudi Arabia for the husband's consent for any medical procedure that affects the reproductive ability of his wife. The history and background of this decree is explained, along with the major arguments for its support. Additionally, the legitimacy of the requirement is discussed from the Islamic and legal perspectives. Special attention is given to relevant cultural considerations, such as the family unit, the medical community, and the larger Saudi society...
July 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
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